Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 10/27/2013 4:21:54 PM EST
I've heard to use animal fat, and I've heard to use veggie based grease/oil to season cast iron cookware.
So far I have used bacon grease and Armor brand lard or manteca with OK results, but the pans still don't have that black, enamel like finish.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:23:23 PM EST
I used crisco, but the enamel finish is coming with the more I cook with my 60+ year old pan.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:23:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/27/2013 4:27:38 PM EST by brown424]
apply moar bacon, or more lard
Cooking a couple of pounds of bacon or sausage is the easiest way to get it done
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:24:47 PM EST
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/757023

Couple of sources are starting to swear by flax seed oil (they claim it polymerizes best and gives the best non-stick coating.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:24:49 PM EST
bacon grease is about all mine gets with the occasional olive oil.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:25:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brown424:
apply moat bacon, or more lard
Cooking a couple of pounds of bacon or sausage is the easiest way to get it done
View Quote

And get it hot and keep it that way for an hour or so in the oven.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:28:43 PM EST
Only problem I have heard of with bacon is the salt and preservatives jacking with the seasoning. Read some use natural uncured bacon. I have used crisco for 15 yrs and it seems to work.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:30:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By crownvic96:
bacon grease is about all mine gets with the occasional olive oil.
View Quote

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:20:15 PM EST
I seasoned mine with vegetable oil (supposedly it came pre-seasoned but I did it anyway), use oil to cook everything (olive or vegetable or just cook bacon) and I clean it with a paper towel and hot water then dry and apply oil after every use. It takes time but it is nice an black and non-stick after about a year. It only gets better with use and age
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:22:22 PM EST
Lard.


It's God's will.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:26:41 PM EST
I actually used coconut oil on an old severely rusted pot that I had cleaned up. Looks and works better than new now.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:37:11 PM EST
Seasoning is only the beginning. Canola or vegetable oil works fine. What you cook in it and how you clean it builds up the real coating and it takes a little time. Bacon, sausage, and hash brown potatoes seem to get it done.

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:39:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Seasoning is only the beginning. Canola or vegetable oil works fine. What you cook in it and how you clean it builds up the real coating and it takes a little time. Bacon, sausage, and hash brown potatoes seem to get it done.

View Quote



I've always used bacon grease, the wife uses vegetable oil. It take a bit to build up.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:40:06 PM EST
Paging Subnet. Subnet, please pick up the white courtesy phone.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:43:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:52:23 PM EST
Coconut oil. Very high smoke point, and it smells like coconut, not burning lard.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:01:07 PM EST
I use oil extracted from the shells of rare beetles found only along the Amazon.






Or Lard, whatever.

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:01:25 PM EST
I use bacon grease and my cast iron works great.
Point of fact - the seasoning is just a starting point, it makes no difference what you use.
The cast iron perfection comes from using the damn thing over and over and over again.
Forget about what to use to season it - just use the damn thing and keep using it until it's perfect....
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:18:20 PM EST
I use cast iron 4-5 times a week.

I use bacon fat, olive oil and coconut oil in mine .

What pan are you using? Sand Cast or Clay cast vintage pans?
clay cast vintage pans require months of use before they're good and black.

Sand Cast lodges will season quicker, but they're not as slick as vintage stuff.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:25:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AFARR:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/757023

Couple of sources are starting to swear by flax seed oil (they claim it polymerizes best and gives the best non-stick coating.
View Quote


Only correct answer. Chowhound is the ar15 of the food world.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:40:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By subjectofcalifornia:
I use cast iron 4-5 times a week.

I use bacon fat, olive oil and coconut oil in mine .

What pan are you using? Sand Cast or Clay cast vintage pans?
clay cast vintage pans require months of use before they're good and black.

Sand Cast lodges will season quicker, but they're not as slick as vintage stuff.
View Quote

Mosly older Lodges. They are almost as slick as the Griswolds and Wagners, just cheaper to buy.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:44:49 PM EST
Am I the only one who uses peanut oil?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:48:52 PM EST
Canola oil. Allows the pan to get hotter before burning.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:51:39 PM EST
Honestly, I use whatever fat I'm cooking with. I scrape the crap out if it after use with a metal spatula, wipe it down , and bring it back to the smoke point with a thin layer of fat on it before letting it cool for storage. It's worked very well on all my iron. Time is your friend, there's no great way to cheat.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:54:05 PM EST
Anyone have good success with the newer Lodges? Mine has proven difficult to keep seasoned. I'm thinking of hitting it with a 3m wheel to smooth the surface.

FWIW I clean with water only, but I really have to scrape sometimes.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:02:48 PM EST
Use CLP.

Everything I cook in my Dutch Oven and my cast iron pans always starts with BACON ! Except bread.

The Lodge cast iron DO and pans need to be scraped with a metal spatula to smooth the flat surface, that assists in making sure nothing sticks.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:11:33 PM EST
I did mine with Crisco and it polymerized nicely.

In fact, this is the first time I've ever been successful at properly seasoning a skillet after following the instructions below.

You know we all have our own ways and methods to season, but the method below has been used by many collectors and cooks alike and it appears to be the BEST for seasoning.

Take the extra time to actually season in the oven as makes a world of difference in the end result.

Once a piece is fully cleaned and dried put it in the oven "naked"; no oil of any kind and heat it to 450°F. Leave it in long enough to just reach that temperature. Be careful and remove the piece from the oven and let it cool to where you can just handle it. This step works great for slightly darkening the peice and giving it a uniform appearance. No one likes a spotted or zebra stripped piece. Use Crisco shortening only and use a cotton rag (t-shirt) to apply a thin/very light coat on the entire piece. If there are tight nooks and crannies to fill in, use a Q-tip.

Once completely and lightly coated (note: we stress a LIGHT coat), put it back in the oven at 400°F for 30 (use a timer) minutes and at that point turn off the oven and leave it in the oven till it cools on it's own.

When you remove the piece it will have a nice dark brown uniform pantina that shines brightly.

You can repeat with one or more coats of Crisco, if you like, but you'll be happy none the less.
View Quote


Wagner & Griswold Society
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:12:07 PM EST
Lard
Top Top