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Posted: 8/11/2014 3:04:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 3:14:12 AM EDT by M4A1bushmaster]
I'm 21, currently working at the post office which is not what I want or can do the rest of my life. I have decided that I need to go back to school to accomplish the things in life that I want to do. With the new school year almost starting already, I'm probably too late to get into that now, so my next option is to start in the spring.

Is this a bad idea? I'd be going for mechincal engineering for those interested
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:06:07 AM EDT
Not stupid. Start when you can. Finish when you can.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:07:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 3:08:30 AM EDT by DevilDog22]
I really don't see why it would. It's never a bad time to start.

You might be able to get into some minimesters or shoter 8 week classes to get some gen eds out of the way. I know the community college I attended offered quite a few.

ETA: if you push it off until next fall, that's just prolongs your time to graduation
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:08:49 AM EDT
Yeah, you miss out on all the fall parties and the women seemed a bit looser in the fall. Maybe it's their first taste of freedom or something, but the poon tap was wide open for me every fall quarter.

If you rush a frat, that's traditionally done in the fall as well.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:09:12 AM EDT
It's never a bad idea to start school.

At my Alma mater the December graduation is just as large as the one in May. (I graduated in December and so will my daughter.)
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:17:50 AM EDT
It's not a show stopper, but sometimes there are two-part classes that are only taught every other semester... the first half in the fall, the second in the spring.

So you may end up taking more electives your first semester, and possibly have to do a class or two in an additional semester at the end.


Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:19:07 AM EDT
Of course not.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:36:08 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By RDak:
Of course not.
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Yep. The sooner you start, the sooner you can finish.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:37:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 3:52:09 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Aimless:
You can graduate in December you know
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yep this is what I did...start whenever you want OP
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:01:04 AM EDT
At a smaller school, there is a risk of being "out of phase" with certain classes and their prerequisites. Other than that, there's nothing to worry about.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:04:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 4:04:35 AM EDT by Mclovin5-0]
Not at all dude. Just remember to use your electives strategically. Basketweaving or the Politics of Lesbian Seagulls can be a lifesaver when you need a break from your major senior year.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:06:28 AM EDT
mech e may have an orchestrated cohort that takes classes in sync

as others have said, you may spend spring taking basic degree required courses.

you should talk to an admission councilor
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:18:54 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By doc_Zox:
mech e may have an orchestrated cohort that takes classes in sync

as others have said, you may spend spring taking basic degree required courses.

you should talk to an admission councilor

View Quote


I figured I would be taking basic courses anyway. It might even be nice since I have not been in school for a few years.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:19:09 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
At a smaller school, there is a risk of being "out of phase" with certain classes and their prerequisites. Other than that, there's nothing to worry about.
View Quote

Yeah that was an issue where I went to school. Some of the required core classes were only offered once per year and you couldn't take the classes that had it as a pre-req. That meant if you missed it or had to retake it you were instantly a year behind.

College should be about having fun, being social, and getting an education. I missed out on the first two and feel I wasted a lot of opportunity. Those would be the only reasons for starting in the fall. The class load isn't as tough, everything is new to a lot of people, and it is very easy to socialize.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:23:21 AM EDT
Nope, in fact many transfers get admission into college easier than incoming fall semester freshmen. With my major (ME) many people never follow the prescribed 4 year plan outlined by the department due to many reasons. This isn't an easy major, so some have failed classes and had to retake them. Others do coop rotations and have to take summer classes to keep on track. Most people that i know in my major do a 4.5 or 5 year plan, sometimes having a planned graduation in august or december.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:24:26 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By KodiakZach:
Not stupid. Start when you can. Finish when you can.
View Quote


FPNI
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:30:30 AM EDT
Currently in college. Is there a certain season I should of started this? I never even thought of that, I just thought of finishing.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:41:21 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 4:42:40 AM EDT
Not at all. I went for mechanical engineering and I started in the spring. It can make your class selection a little different but you'll get on track, plus since you've been out of school for a bit who knows where you'll place for math, I did fine on the calculus placement test but boned the algebra so I had to take pre-calc anyway.

As stated, start as soon as you can and go summers if you can afford to. Also don't fuck off in gen ed classes, use those easy A's to boost your overall gpa, you'll be glad later on you did. I was.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:07:47 AM EDT
Yes its stupid.

You are going to miss out on a shitload of 18 year old (some virgin) tight pussy that is ready, willing and able to fuck anytime and anyplace it wants too.

After the first couple weeks of the feeding frenzy, they begin to realize that they are just being used, and some begin to catch stuff.

By spring, they will have gained 15 pounds, been involved in countless trains, and taken a shitload of dick.

When I was in school, every fall I was pumping loads into 20 or more freshmen girls during those first few weeks of school.

Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:17:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 5:17:38 AM EDT by RedDane]
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Originally Posted By KodiakZach:
Not stupid. Start when you can. Finish when you can.
View Quote


FPNI

Just make sure that 1) You use the opportunity to learn 2) You graduate.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:19:54 AM EDT
If you were an 18 year old kid, then you would miss out by not starting in the Fall. As a 21 year old man, no, get in there and get it done.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:20:26 AM EDT
It depends on your major. More regimented programs require classes be taken in a particular order, and prerequisites are often not offered in the Spring.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:25:46 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SWIRE:

Yeah that was an issue where I went to school. Some of the required core classes were only offered once per year and you couldn't take the classes that had it as a pre-req. That meant if you missed it or had to retake it you were instantly a year behind.

College should be about having fun, being social, and getting an education. I missed out on the first two and feel I wasted a lot of opportunity. Those would be the only reasons for starting in the fall. The class load isn't as tough, everything is new to a lot of people, and it is very easy to socialize.
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Originally Posted By SWIRE:
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
At a smaller school, there is a risk of being "out of phase" with certain classes and their prerequisites. Other than that, there's nothing to worry about.

Yeah that was an issue where I went to school. Some of the required core classes were only offered once per year and you couldn't take the classes that had it as a pre-req. That meant if you missed it or had to retake it you were instantly a year behind.

College should be about having fun, being social, and getting an education. I missed out on the first two and feel I wasted a lot of opportunity. Those would be the only reasons for starting in the fall. The class load isn't as tough, everything is new to a lot of people, and it is very easy to socialize.



Most colleges no longer follw the Fall, Spring Summer 1, 2 calendars exclusively.

Summer mini, May mini, Winter mini, Fall 2, Spring 2, All summer.

I think my college has 9 different 'semesters' per year now.

Also, OP, don't overlook the opportunity to go to 2 schools at once via face to face and online courses. If you missed a basic course this Fall, you could easily be enrolled in a Fall mini or Winter mini to pick up those credits in a 2 week window.

It is very important that you go to see a counselor, face to face, ASAP to get all your options and get the paperwork and testing started. Don't guess, or assume. Go communicate with the people that will be able to actually give you hard facts, deadlines and calendars of classes.

TRG
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:27:13 AM EDT
At age 21, you're probably not too interested in pledging a fraternity, joining ROTC, or doing the other things that traditionally start in the fall. Anytime is good for starting college.

I started in the fall, but went straight through (including summers), took a heavy course load, and graduated in 3 years. With High Honors and Phi Beta Kappa. No social fraternities or crap like that. I was focussed. Then I got my law degree in 2 1/2 years. (It helped that the State of Texas provided free tuition.)

Link Posted: 8/11/2014 5:29:56 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:



Most colleges no longer follw the Fall, Spring Summer 1, 2 calendars exclusively.

Summer mini, May mini, Winter mini, Fall 2, Spring 2, All summer.

I think my college has 9 different 'semesters' per year now.

Also, OP, don't overlook the opportunity to go to 2 schools at once via face to face and online courses. If you missed a basic course this Fall, you could easily be enrolled in a Fall mini or Winter mini to pick up those credits in a 2 week window.

It is very important that you go to see a counselor, face to face, ASAP to get all your options and get the paperwork and testing started. Don't guess, or assume. Go communicate with the people that will be able to actually give you hard facts, deadlines and calendars of classes.

TRG
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Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By SWIRE:
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
At a smaller school, there is a risk of being "out of phase" with certain classes and their prerequisites. Other than that, there's nothing to worry about.

Yeah that was an issue where I went to school. Some of the required core classes were only offered once per year and you couldn't take the classes that had it as a pre-req. That meant if you missed it or had to retake it you were instantly a year behind.

College should be about having fun, being social, and getting an education. I missed out on the first two and feel I wasted a lot of opportunity. Those would be the only reasons for starting in the fall. The class load isn't as tough, everything is new to a lot of people, and it is very easy to socialize.



Most colleges no longer follw the Fall, Spring Summer 1, 2 calendars exclusively.

Summer mini, May mini, Winter mini, Fall 2, Spring 2, All summer.

I think my college has 9 different 'semesters' per year now.

Also, OP, don't overlook the opportunity to go to 2 schools at once via face to face and online courses. If you missed a basic course this Fall, you could easily be enrolled in a Fall mini or Winter mini to pick up those credits in a 2 week window.

It is very important that you go to see a counselor, face to face, ASAP to get all your options and get the paperwork and testing started. Don't guess, or assume. Go communicate with the people that will be able to actually give you hard facts, deadlines and calendars of classes.

TRG
Also ask students if your advisers are morons. I saw tons of people fucked over by bad advice when I was in undergrad. The advisers where I went to undergrad were notoriously awful. Most universities will pretty clearly spell out degree requirements and the like. Read these documents carefully before seeing the adviser. I also suggest looking up offerings for required classes in past semesters to get a good idea of whether or not prerequisites are offered in Spring semesters.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 6:39:06 AM EDT
Had a pretty bad experience with those "once a year" seminars.

Apart from that: what difference does it make?
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 6:42:16 AM EDT
Its not a bad idea at all. Start when you can, and get finished up when you can. Dont get too caught up on the normal schedule of it.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 6:43:38 AM EDT
Not good if you're going into debt.

In hard economic times, professionals like engineers, architects and lawyers can starve from the lack of clients.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 6:52:03 AM EDT
I started in the spring on an accelerated entrance program. I was technically still in high school but took a full semester of college before I graduated from HS.
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 6:55:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2014 6:56:30 AM EDT by bigrob83]
doesnt matter

when you get higher up into your 3rd or 4th year lots of classes at some colleges are only offered in spring or fall
and fill up quick. you dont get in the class you have to wait a year or find something else to take its place
you can always take a summer class or two to "catch up" if needed

first year your just getting basics out of the way anyway
eventually you will be having to take night classes, morning classes, afternoon classes
it gets to be a real pain in the ass the further you get into it
Link Posted: 8/11/2014 7:31:13 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:
Also ask students if your advisers are morons. I saw tons of people fucked over by bad advice when I was in undergrad. The advisers where I went to undergrad were notoriously awful. Most universities will pretty clearly spell out degree requirements and the like. Read these documents carefully before seeing the adviser. I also suggest looking up offerings for required classes in past semesters to get a good idea of whether or not prerequisites are offered in Spring semesters.
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Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By SWIRE:
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
At a smaller school, there is a risk of being "out of phase" with certain classes and their prerequisites. Other than that, there's nothing to worry about.

Yeah that was an issue where I went to school. Some of the required core classes were only offered once per year and you couldn't take the classes that had it as a pre-req. That meant if you missed it or had to retake it you were instantly a year behind.

College should be about having fun, being social, and getting an education. I missed out on the first two and feel I wasted a lot of opportunity. Those would be the only reasons for starting in the fall. The class load isn't as tough, everything is new to a lot of people, and it is very easy to socialize.



Most colleges no longer follw the Fall, Spring Summer 1, 2 calendars exclusively.

Summer mini, May mini, Winter mini, Fall 2, Spring 2, All summer.

I think my college has 9 different 'semesters' per year now.

Also, OP, don't overlook the opportunity to go to 2 schools at once via face to face and online courses. If you missed a basic course this Fall, you could easily be enrolled in a Fall mini or Winter mini to pick up those credits in a 2 week window.

It is very important that you go to see a counselor, face to face, ASAP to get all your options and get the paperwork and testing started. Don't guess, or assume. Go communicate with the people that will be able to actually give you hard facts, deadlines and calendars of classes.

TRG
Also ask students if your advisers are morons. I saw tons of people fucked over by bad advice when I was in undergrad. The advisers where I went to undergrad were notoriously awful. Most universities will pretty clearly spell out degree requirements and the like. Read these documents carefully before seeing the adviser. I also suggest looking up offerings for required classes in past semesters to get a good idea of whether or not prerequisites are offered in Spring semesters.


^^^^ This is advice is important, do not assume anything will ever just be taken care of.. you have to follow up on everything. Transcripts, Financial Aid, Course Requirements, do not accept it will be okay or it will happen in a week. Check with your specific College as well inside the University, there is typically an advisor there as well who will know far more that the general advisors you will see at student services.

Also do not be afraid to escalate as needed, just start working your way up the ladder there is always a way to get things done.



Link Posted: 8/11/2014 7:35:40 AM EDT
If you're worried about it, I'd recommend making an appointment to see a counselor on campus. You should go at least once anyway. They'll help you with the course catalog they offer, and they are paid to help you put the classes you need on a reasonable schedule you can manage
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