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Posted: 11/22/2012 6:12:56 AM EST
I have several of the 40 gram silica gel dessicant packs (the flat perforated metal packs).
I stuck a few that had turned pink in the oven while the wife was cooking baked beans and her famous
sweet potato crunch. She freaked out and said I was poisoning the food. I told her that it was simply evaporating
the moisture from the packs and no harmful chemicals were being released.

Am I correct?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:16:06 AM EST
So you use your oven so much that you can't utilize it when no food is in it?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:21:02 AM EST
First rule of food:

If in doubt, don't.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:21:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By PanzerOfDoom:
So you use your oven so much that you can't utilize it when no food is in it?


KInda what I was thinking. Why would you even do this?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:24:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 6:50:12 AM EST
If you have kids let them eat first then wait an hour,you can always have more kids.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:02:56 AM EST
I hope this won't be another of those "I don't think this will turn out the way OP intended" threads.

I got my Glock and AR boxes out this AM (big plastic toolboxes in which I store parts and mags) for a range trip this afternoon and noted that the dessicant packs needed to be "recharged",
so I thought I'd throw them in the oven while it was on.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:05:44 AM EST
Why not wait until she removes her beans, before you stick your pack into her oven?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:06:04 AM EST
Enjoy your turkey jerky.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:07:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By WindKnot1-1:
First rule of food:

If in doubt, don't.


Put me down for this.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:09:44 AM EST
When I was in the Air Force, I worked on meteorological equipment that had desiccant that would have to be dried out. We used a microwave that was also used to cook food. I don't see a problem with it. You're just separating the water from the desiccant.

Note: Our desiccant was in a little glass jar, not a foil pack. I wouldn't stick your foil packs in the microwave.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:12:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By 6winchester2:
Originally Posted By WindKnot1-1:
First rule of food:

If in doubt, don't.


Put me down for this.
Kinda on board with this.

I wouldn't think it would hurt anything, but not knowing for sure = DONT DO IT


Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:14:19 AM EST
Anything involving man-logic and oven usage for non-food items while food is in the oven is guaranteed to result in vagitative explosions. Do it during holiday food prep and you are toast X's 2.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:14:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/22/2012 7:15:46 AM EST by California_Kid]
Negative. Any temperature appropriate for drying out dessicant packs is not hot enough to bring food to a safe temperature.

If you get saturated silica gel too hot, it blows up like popcorn and makes a mess.

This is from experience. I already made that mistake. Don't do it.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:14:37 AM EST
You wife is right. Try using your head a little more.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:16:05 AM EST
Your dessicant packs will absorb the moisture released from the cooking beans.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:16:23 AM EST
I would be more worried about contaminating the desiccant with food odors, oil fumes and the like than the desiccant contaminating the food.

Oil fumes would kill the desiccant eventually.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:17:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By California_Kid:
Negative. Any temperature appropriate for drying out dessicant packs is not hot enough to bring food to a safe temperature.

If you get saturated silica gel too hot, it blows up like popcorn and makes a mess.

This is from experience. I already made that mistake. Don't do it.


And there you have it.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:17:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/22/2012 7:18:33 AM EST by 57Strat]
The instructions I have with my 900 gram silica gel bags are to put them in the oven for 3 hours at 240F degrees. What food can you cook at 240F degrees?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:17:32 AM EST
Hmmm, beans have moisture, and give off some of that moisture while cooking.

Nope. I cant see a problem with this.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:20:58 AM EST
Hey guys. Do you think the moisture content in the oven, when we are cooking our Turkey, will be to high to dry out my socks?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:24:25 AM EST
You know the saying that if it's stupid and it works, it's not stupid? That doesn't apply in this case.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:55:49 AM EST
just take your food out then shove the stuff in. Use the residual heat.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:57:08 AM EST
well if you put a turd in there with your food, that would certainly dry out too. But that doesn't sound like a good idea now does it?

Originally Posted By nick89302:
When I was in the Air Force, I worked on meteorological equipment that had desiccant that would have to be dried out. We used a microwave that was also used to cook food. I don't see a problem with it. You're just separating the water from the desiccant.

Note: Our desiccant was in a little glass jar, not a foil pack. I wouldn't stick your foil packs in the microwave.


Link Posted: 11/22/2012 7:58:16 AM EST
Get a toaster oven and dry them out in there.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 8:37:20 AM EST
dibs on your guns.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 8:45:27 AM EST
If you are trying to save money, after you pull the food and turn the oven off stick the stuff in and use the residual heat.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:14:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/22/2012 9:16:44 AM EST by TerryC]
...
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:18:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/22/2012 9:20:31 AM EST by mo98]

Originally Posted By 57Strat:
The instructions I have with my 900 gram silica gel bags are to put them in the oven for 3 hours at 240F degrees. What food can you cook at 240F degrees?

pork shoulder takes about 12 hours but is fall off the bone tender and amazing. Get the skin on one and cut the skin in to squares they turn in to pork rinds

eta: I do something similar to this http://www.delish.com/recipefinder/jamie-oliver-overnight-slow-roasted-pork-recipe with just plain spices.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:19:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By SeanR:
Originally Posted By PanzerOfDoom:
So you use your oven so much that you can't utilize it when no food is in it?


KInda what I was thinking. Why would you even do this?


This thread is water head thread #4 for today. Like really WTF if wrong with people?
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:21:04 AM EST
Originally Posted By Hornet22:
I hope this won't be another of those "I don't think this will turn out the way OP intended" threads.

I got my Glock and AR boxes out this AM (big plastic toolboxes in which I store parts and mags) for a range trip this afternoon and noted that the dessicant packs needed to be "recharged",
so I thought I'd throw them in the oven while it was on.


Oh no.... by sheer stupidity it was one of thoose threads from the get go. The first clue may have been family members making you eat meat with a spoon as a child.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:47:24 AM EST
Why?

Are you trying to save a buck or two on electricity or gas?

When the wife is DONE baking you dinner or a cake, keep the oven on and then put in your shit. Keeping an oven hot does not require a lot of energy.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:50:27 AM EST
Wait, we're looking at this from the wrong angle.

OP, are you trying to mess with your wife on a holiday by attacking/threatening/creating chaos involving the most important appliance in the house? Then you are doing it right! Carry on.
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:54:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By FordGuy:
well if you put a turd in there with your food, that would certainly dry out too. But that doesn't sound like a good idea now does it?

Originally Posted By nick89302:
When I was in the Air Force, I worked on meteorological equipment that had desiccant that would have to be dried out. We used a microwave that was also used to cook food. I don't see a problem with it. You're just separating the water from the desiccant.

Note: Our desiccant was in a little glass jar, not a foil pack. I wouldn't stick your foil packs in the microwave.



Depends on who is cooking
Link Posted: 11/22/2012 9:54:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By otar:
Hmmm, beans have moisture, and give off some of that moisture while cooking.

Nope. I cant see a problem with this.


My God! He's right! OP just divided by zero. Perpetual motion is achieved.

For real? Don't think I would eat those beans if I knew that.


Link Posted: 11/22/2012 11:59:31 AM EST
Did the OP pass from contamination?
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