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Posted: 4/20/2016 3:56:02 AM EDT
My place was built in the 60's, and it has a few areas that I am almost sure is asbestos.
No pics, but it has 8" or 9" vinyl tiles throughout most of it that are probably asbestos, and the area in the attic above the range and hot water heater have this ground corn cob looking stuff that I expect is asbestos.
Anyway, it doesn't bother me, but I want to redo the floor one day, and at least one room will have to be stripped down to the subfloor due to some damage.
So, any of you that have worked on older homes with these tiles and such, did you just ignore it and do the work, or panic and call in guys in rubber suits and pay big bucks to get it out?
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 5:02:15 AM EDT
Just did it
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 5:08:00 AM EDT
Asbestos is only hazardous when it becomes friable. Which is basically a fancy word meaning "breathable."

If you decide to remove the floor tile then soak with water to loosen them. Or use a heat gun to soften the mastic. And don't grind the the tile or mastic as both will have asbestos in them. Grinding makes it breathable.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 5:58:21 AM EDT
I just tear into it and not worry about that stuff.  Asbestos, mold, lead paint...  I do it almost daily too, depending on the house.  In another 5 years it will be something else we will have to watch out for.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:03:28 AM EDT
I'm licensed in asbestos.  Just keep it wet and clean up as soon as the tile's up.  Give the room a mop then buy a hepa filter for a shop-vac and give the room a once over when you're finished.  Wear a P100 mask and disposable clothes if you're worried.  It's pretty hard to get floor tile friable.  

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bumblebee_Bob:
Asbestos is only hazardous when it becomes friable. Which is basically a fancy word meaning "breathable."

If you decide to remove the floor tile then soak with water to loosen them. Or use a heat gun to soften the mastic. And don't grind the the tile or mastic as both will have asbestos in them. Grinding makes it breathable.
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Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:43:53 AM EDT
I replaced some carpet in my family room. Under the old carpet was some original 1960s vinyl tile. A few were loose from the mastic. My contractor said he wouldn't move them without checking for asbestos and that would cost me. He offered to just replace the old carpet with the new since the tiles were already down, and none were missing which could've left a spot you could feel through the carpet. His other suggestion was to have me pick up the loose tiles, and then he would skim coat some self-leveling compound to even out between the still-stuck tiles and the missing tiles. Not sure if that's an option for you, or even allowed. Hopefully some of the asbestos guys can answer about the skim coating over the tiles to fill in voids and smooth the surface for tile.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:05:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By rjbergen:
I replaced some carpet in my family room. Under the old carpet was some original 1960s vinyl tile. A few were loose from the mastic. My contractor said he wouldn't move them without checking for asbestos and that would cost me. He offered to just replace the old carpet with the new since the tiles were already down, and none were missing which could've left a spot you could feel through the carpet. His other suggestion was to have me pick up the loose tiles, and then he would skim coat some self-leveling compound to even out between the still-stuck tiles and the missing tiles. Not sure if that's an option for you, or even allowed. Hopefully some of the asbestos guys can answer about the skim coating over the tiles to fill in voids and smooth the surface for tile.
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One of the approved methods of abatement is encapsulation.

Thus leaving the tiles in place and gluing new carpet over it works. It's been done in my work place. If I'm following what your saying the the self leveling compound was used where tiles were missing so you'd have a flat surface under the carpet.

He, as a contractor, is required to check for asbestos. A home owner has more "leeway" in what they do.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 12:52:00 PM EDT
We deal with it at work in an industrial setting.  Just do it.  Use wet methods and a proper respirator.
If it is asbestos containing insulation (often used around pipes), glovebag it.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:27:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bumblebee_Bob:
Asbestos is only hazardous when it becomes friable. Which is basically a fancy word meaning "breathable."
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"Friable" is defined as being able to be broken up with your bare hands.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 9:34:56 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By brickeyee:

"Friable" is defined as being able to be broken up with your bare hands.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Bumblebee_Bob:
Asbestos is only hazardous when it becomes friable. Which is basically a fancy word meaning "breathable."

"Friable" is defined as being able to be broken up with your bare hands.


Oops
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:17:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/20/2016 10:20:10 PM EDT by HighCaliber]
I think the only asbestos in my house is in the tape sealing the duct joints.  I took some out when I removed the furnace.  I just soaked it with water and scraped it into a plastic bag.  Most of the old ducts are still intact so I coated it all with mastic when I sealed them.  I'm not sure if it's in the plaster on the walls.  If it is I probably screwed up when I used a circular saw to cut into the bathroom walls for an exhaust fan.  Now that I think of it I probably powdered a whole bunch of lead paint too.
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