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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/12/2005 6:23:37 PM EDT
I'm chainsaw shopping. Sears has a nice big one for $199 ($30 sale) and the Stihl dealer has a mid-size one for $299. What makes the Stihl better?
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:25:07 PM EDT
One vowel in the name....
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:25:21 PM EDT
Why are ARs more expensive than AKs?
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:25:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 6:26:05 PM EDT by Belfry_Express]
think bushmaster vs colt


my dad has a craftsman and it runs like a champ, even after 10 years

edited to get the comparison right
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:27:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 6:36:45 PM EDT by CJan_NH]
Yes, the Stihl is worth the extra dough.

Stihl saws are honest to God commercial grade rigs designed for continuous, hard use by professionals.

I went through this last year when I bought my first chainsaw. I ended up buying an Echo though, because my saw is used purely for occasional, around the yard type of use.


Originally Posted By Belfry_Express:
think bushmaster vs colt


my dad has a craftsman and it runs like a champ, even after 10 years

edited to get the comparison right


So are you saying that Bushmaster is a consumer grade AR, and Colts are for professionals?

Is your Dad a logger who uses his saw for 8-12 hours per day, every day?

There is a reason why Stihls and Huskys are about the only two brands seriously considered by professionals.

ETA: Open up the phone book and look up "Tree Services". Give a few companies a call and ask them what they use. The vast majority of them will give you one of two answers.

ETAA: This doesn't mean that you necessarily need a Stihl saw-but you asked if they're worth the $$$. I chose the smaller Echo because I didn't need a monster saw for my weekend warrior tasks around the yard.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:30:26 PM EDT
I would think the Stihl is lighter at least. I don't know if anyone has done a comparison though?

I'm a firm believer in You get what you pay for. I had a homelite trimmer and then got a Husky trimmer........Definately night and day difference.

I have a stihl chainsaw and love it.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:36:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CJan_NH:
Yes, the Stihl is worth the extra dough.

Stihl saws are honest to God commercial grade rigs designed for continuous, hard use by professionals.

I went through this last year when I bought my first chainsaw. I ended up buying an Echo though, because my saw is used purely for occasional, around the yard type of use.


Originally Posted By Belfry_Express:
think bushmaster vs colt


my dad has a craftsman and it runs like a champ, even after 10 years

edited to get the comparison right


So are you saying that Bushmaster is a consumer grade AR, and Colts are for professionals?

Is your Dad a logger who uses his saw for 8-12 hours per day, every day?

There is a reason why Stihls and Huskys are about the only two brands seriously considered by professionals.

ETA: Open up the phone book and look up "Tree Services". Give a few a call and ask them what they use. The vast majority of them will give you one of two answers.



no, I was being slightly inflamatory at the koolaid crowd.

I am just saying that pop's saw has not given him a lick of trouble and yes, he has used it for extended periods (tornado cleanup here in Ga) and hasnt had an issue with it.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:37:02 PM EDT
My company cleaned up after hurricaine Isabel with several Stihl saws.

We cut downed trees every day, all day for about 2 months straight, all I had to do was keep sharp chains on them and gas and oil in them. Not a single problem. We wore out many chains and several bars but that's to be expected.

We put HARD miles on those saws, I still have all of them and they all still work very well.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:37:20 PM EDT
Stihl is for every day use, Craftsman is for hanging on pegboard by a hook with an outline around it.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:40:58 PM EDT
The Stihl is well worth the extra $100. They can handle serious use. If you only use it a couple of times a year and the $100 is a big deal, go with the craftsman. If you can afford the $100, get the good stuff.

Gus
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:41:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Belfry_Express:

no, I was being slightly inflamatory at the koolaid crowd.

I am just saying that pop's saw has not given him a lick of trouble and yes, he has used it for extended periods (tornado cleanup here in Ga) and hasnt had an issue with it.


No offense taken

I'm sure his saw is great, just as my little 16" Echo is great for me. That being said, I doubt my saw would ever stand up to the continuous abuse of a professional.

If I heated my home with wood or cut trees for a living I'd spend the dough on a better saw. Since I don't I saved some money

Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:41:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:41:54 PM EDT
I would get the Stihl.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:41:59 PM EDT
Yes. Craftsman isn't Craftsman. Most likely manufactured by Poulan.

Buy the Stihl.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:42:31 PM EDT
Ebay is a good source for new and used saws.

be careful of used, ask questions.

you can save 30-40 percent.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:43:59 PM EDT
As already mentioned, your saw selection should be based on how much you think you will use it. I looked at craftsman, homelite, echo, stihl, and a few others. I ended up getting a husqvarna.

I don't think you could go wrong with stihl, echo, jonsred, husqvarna. What finally made the decision for me was the proximity and availibility of parts and local service centers.

Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:44:53 PM EDT
Very good advice here.

Same with drills... Craftsman power tools are consumer grade for the most part. Pros use Dewalt, Porter Cable, and the like...
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:45:37 PM EDT
Okay, I'm sold. Thanks.

BTW, the saw I'm replacing is about a 30 year old Craftsman my dad gave me. It still runs like a champ, but it shook loose some housing screws under the chain drive, and I can't get the damn thing off. I'll get it fixed and give it back to him--he has an attachment to it and I don't. But damn, Craftsman was a great saw back in the day.

'course the housing was metal back then, not plastic.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:45:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 6:49:29 PM EDT by DanM]
I have had both. If it is only for occasional use you could maybe not
be sorry you didn't spend the extra $100 for the extra quality. If you
plan on working it hard, spend the $100.
Or you could call around to the various tool rental places to see which
brand they buy to rent out. Guaranteed not to be a Craftsman.

DanM

ETA: I guess we were both typing at the same time. Good decision.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:46:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 6:48:27 PM EDT by A_Free_Man]
Yes, Stihl is what you will see commercial landscapers using. Not as heavy duty as some others, but better than most, including Craftsman. The comment about hanging on pegboard is right on. I had a McCollough at one time.

I assume you are asking because you have some trees down, never used one before.

While you can buy sharpeners to use with your dremel tool, or file by hand, once the chain gets dull, it is faster to change the chain. Go on and buy two extra chains, especially if you are cutting up cedar or other hardwoods.

If it starts making fine powdery sawdust instead of chips, the chain is dull.

Read the directions.

Make sure no one is standing near you, including behind you. I once hit a knot, the saw bounced up over my head, and back. Nearly hit my wife who had walked up with some water for me.

Be aware of the situation. Look at how things are laying... if you cut there, will that limb pop up? Will that fall over on your? Survey the job first. Reevaluate often. Be careful.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:49:47 PM EDT
We have had the best luck with Husqvarnas.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:50:21 PM EDT

There is a reason why Stihls and Huskys are about the only two brands seriously considered by professionals.



+1
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:51:30 PM EDT
Yup,
I have a 16" Mac saw that has been awesome over the past 10 years, but again, occasional use. For a pruning and trimming saw, I have no problem getting a good consumer saw.

For 18" or above, pony up for a Stihl or Husky.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:52:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JCKnife:
What makes the Stihl better?



Its a Stihl, thats what makes it better.

Everyone else has said why.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:59:01 PM EDT
Stihl makes a good saw....not the best but certainly up there. If you're going to use it much, it's worth the $$.

I think Echo & Jonsered make better saws, but they're on par money wise.

A great value for a good saw is Cub Commercial, which are actually rebadged Efco saws. Very good saws, great warranty and powerful. I have one, and it's been a very reliable machine.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:00:17 PM EDT
If you actually have to use the saw for any length of time, the Stihl will be worth thousands more to you . With the more expensive saws you are buying a better design and ergos. The inexpensive saws are somewhat boxey and the corners tend naw on your hips and legs. You are looking at small saws so I'd imagine it is for general use around the house if so a small homelite would be good. Don't buy a saw without a spike or cannot be fitted with one. BTW did I mention Don't buy a saw without a spike or cannot be fitted with one.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:04:19 PM EDT
my dad once told me

"son, buy a used stihl over a new poulan everytime"
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:09:21 PM EDT
I was once told that if you "buy the best and you only cry once". I've found that statement to hold true more often than not.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:11:45 PM EDT
If you're only going to be cutting a cord or so a year, or felling a few (2 or 3) trees, get the Craftsman. Run it dry (empty tank/empty carb) after each use.

Otherwise, +1 for the Stihl. Most of the FD's around here have Stihls as their gas powered Circular saws, and "regular" chain saws (as opposed to the roof vent saws with carbide blades).

I own one. No problems at all, except the damn blades keep gettin' dull
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:16:00 PM EDT
Stihl,
Husky,
Johnesrud,




all the other crap.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:32:25 PM EDT
Stihl all the way,The bucking spike(they allways forget the bucking spike)without it you are just pushing a tool that needs to pull it's way through wood!!!!!


Bob
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:37:40 PM EDT
In a word "YES"
I know too many tree professionals that would have nothing else.
I often use a buddies thats oiler has been dead for 8+ years.......
still the best cutting saw I've ever touched.......
run it til the chain locks up on the bar let er cool for bout 5 mins....
good to go.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:49:54 PM EDT
YES
The Craftsman is basically like a disposable razor, when it break buy another.
The Stihl is a much better saw and while parts for aren't cheap, they are not hard to find.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 7:52:10 PM EDT
Okay guys you got me: WTF is a bucking spike?
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 10:46:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JCKnife:
Okay guys you got me: WTF is a bucking spike?





See the "R"? Those jagged teeth are what are being called "Bucking Spikes" . I was taught they were called "log dogs". Same thing, different name :) What they do is dig into the wood while you are cutting. This allows the saw to do the cutting with less fatigue to you because you don't have to fight the tugging action of the saw as it pulls into the wood. They can also keep a log from rolling on you if it is small enough to do so.
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