Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 9/16/2009 1:16:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 1:20:32 AM EST by JBlitzen]
Or is it just a pointless characterization of a certain type of nerd?

I took that test in Wired which says that a score of 16 out of, I think, 50, is average, and got a 37, but it all sounds like it describes a normal introvert.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:21:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 1:38:57 AM EST by Chairborne]
You're bound to offend somebody with that question. About 1/3 of GD has decided they have Aspergers. Most of them just read a symptom list and said, yep that's me!


ETA: To answer the OP's question. Yes, it probably does exist in a very tiny percent of the population. Like all other variants of Autism though, it's massively over-diagnosed as of late.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:22:13 AM EST
...And remember boys and girls: It's ass-purge-ers syndrome, not ass-burgers syndrome.


Seriously, I think it's real.



Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:27:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 1:29:34 AM EST by str8tshooter]
My son has Asperger's. It's real. Like many things it'll be overdiagnosed for a while but it's real. An online test can't tell you if you have it either.
You're right in that they often present as just a super introverted person but it goes further. There are normally sensory integration issues as well as other cognitive symptoms that it really takes a pro to diganose. Anyone who thinks they or a loved one has it should get a neuropsychological evaluation by a good Neuropsych. Not that there's really anything to do but deal with it. There's no real treatment, just learning to cope.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:28:13 AM EST
I've met a few kids with genuine Aspergers.

Its not just a made up condition.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:29:49 AM EST
Originally Posted By JBlitzen:
Or is it just a pointless characterization of a certain type of nerd?

I took that test in Wired which says that a score of 16 out of, I think, 50, is average, and got a 37, but it all sounds like it describes a normal introvert.


Yes its real, my brother has it.
Don't assume something is fake because it is grossly misdiagnosed.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:47:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
You're bound to offend somebody with that question. About 1/3 of GD has decided they have Aspergers. Most of them just read a symptom list and said, yep that's me!


ETA: To answer the OP's question. Yes, it probably does exist in a very tiny percent of the population. Like all other variants of Autism though, it's massively over-diagnosed as of late.


Most people have at least a couple symptoms of almost every malady out there if you follow the drug companies list of symptoms.

For example, when I woke up this morning I coughed a couple times, was a little achey, had crud in my eyes and had to pee BAD. So that means I have the flu, pink eye, and irritable bladder syndrome - right?

As for the aspergers syndrome, I know a young boy who was misdiagnosed with ADD(or something like that) and when he was finally properly diagnosed and his medicine changed he is like a different person - an energetic kid not a basket case.

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 1:56:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 2:14:24 AM EST by turdferguson]
I was formally diagnosed with asperger's syndrome by doctors. It's very real, and very inconveniencing. It's not an excuse for anything, I get by just fine in life.

At least now I do. I didn't know until I was about 18 or 19 that when someone says "hello", you say "hello" back.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:02:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 2:05:56 AM EST by BUCC_Guy]




I work with kids with Asperger's. To say it's made up in some capacity is simply beyond stupid.


Asperger's does NOT mean someone is incapable of being "smart" or productive. Here is a college student talking about how he has Asperger's.

Just like the kids I've worked with, eye contact is way off. You'll notice he looks around the room a lot and sometimes makes eye contact with the camera, but I guarantee you he isn't making eye contact with the interviewer for more than a few seconds.

The guy in the video has clearly been through a lot of special help sessions of some sort. He is fully aware and able to describe his condition, but I was hoping for him to give more examples.

It is hard to describe how social situations "wear them out." Like the guy says in the video, he has to piece together everything to make sense of what people are doing socially. When working with Asperger's kids, I have to explain a lot of things to make their day easier. Saying things like "that kid has a chip on his shoulder" will result in a one of my kids asking for Pringles.

Asperger's kids come under attack a lot because they can often perform academically, so people assume there is nothing "wrong" with them. The problem is that same kid that can do the homework before the bell rings for the next class often isn't able to talk about the football game last night. "Small talk" isn't their strong point.

- BG


EDIT: Heh... one of the things I'll do with younger Asperger's kids is make faces that are demonstrative of a given emotion to see if they pick up on it. Sometimes they say the damnest things like, "You're making a face like you ate a lemon, but you haven't been eating lemons!" (He shows that he recognizes a "bad" face but can't begin to fathom why I'm making it.)
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:11:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 2:16:44 AM EST by Baldmonk]
Real.

I know several. Prevelant in Engineers. I think they tend to gravitate to engineering since they don't typically have to interact much. Many very gifted Surgeons also have it. Hence the saying he is the best in his field, but ZERO bed side manner.


Very intelligent, but can't fit into normal society.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:15:29 AM EST
Real, but a popular disease right now, so it is over diagnosed.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:16:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By Baldmonk:
Real.

I know several. Very prevelant in Engineers. Very intelligent, but can't fit into normal society.


We had an old school name for that. Nerd.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:18:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
Originally Posted By Baldmonk:
Real.

I know several. Very prevelant in Engineers. Very intelligent, but can't fit into normal society.


We had an old school name for that. Nerd.


This is different.

Most can't or can't fathom how to show affection, empathy, or many other emotions. Until you meet a real one, you really don't understand, but you will be able to pick out others more easily afterword.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:32:05 AM EST
I have a very slight touch of Asperger's Syndrome characteristics. I would characterize it as a "Shadow Syndrome" as described in John J. Ratey's book by the same name. My symptoms are mild enough that most people wouldn't notice them but I am certainly aware of them and the impact they've had on my life. They also are greatly exacerbated in group situations, where I often joke that I become full-blown Autistic.

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:36:48 AM EST
Real
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:44:57 AM EST
I am no doctor, and really didnt know anything about Asperger's until this thread and took the opportunity to look up more information. So, from my basic understanding, I think that some may question whether Asperger's is real because it is a relatively new diagnosis and seems to me to not be fully understood. Hans Asperger first studied the condition in children in his practice and wrote about the condition during WW2 in Germany (duh! hello! in view of the the place and time, why do you think his studies might have been over looked). Only in the early 80s did the term Asperger begin to be applied and only in the early 90s was Asperger's original paper translated into English. Additionally Asperger only became a standard diagnosis in about 1992-1994.

Nothing like a little self education.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:30:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:




I work with kids with Asperger's. To say it's made up in some capacity is simply beyond stupid.


Asperger's does NOT mean someone is incapable of being "smart" or productive. Here is a college student talking about how he has Asperger's.


- BG


EDIT: Heh... one of the things I'll do with younger Asperger's kids is make faces that are demonstrative of a given emotion to see if they pick up on it. Sometimes they say the damnest things like, "You're making a face like you ate a lemon, but you haven't been eating lemons!" (He shows that he recognizes a "bad" face but can't begin to fathom why I'm making it.)

I don't think the OP was implying it was fake, just inquiring. Another example of this type of problem is in reading assignments that have questions such as What do you think the main character was thinking/feeling? Why did they make the choice they did?
Drive my son bananas. "How am I supposed to know what some made up character is thinking? It's ridiculous!!"
Reasonable-type adult: "Just imagine you're in their situation. How would you feel?"
Son: " How the heck am I supposed to do that?!?" He's improved a great deal but still loathes anything in the form of a book report.

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:32:37 PM EST
I'd say my nephew has it. Serious social skill problems and an insane obsession with numbers. He's not autistic but he ain't right.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:35:19 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:37:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By str8tshooter:

I don't think the OP was implying it was fake, just inquiring. Another example of this type of problem is in reading assignments that have questions such as What do you think the main character was thinking/feeling? Why did they make the choice they did?
Drive my son bananas. "How am I supposed to know what some made up character is thinking? It's ridiculous!!"
Reasonable-type adult: "Just imagine you're in their situation. How would you feel?"
Son: " How the heck am I supposed to do that?!?" He's improved a great deal but still loathes anything in the form of a book report.

I don't think I'm an aspie, but your son's response is still the same as mine.



Oh I don't know, DF. I think you're a pretty good candidate.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:41:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:




I work with kids with Asperger's. To say it's made up in some capacity is simply beyond stupid.


Asperger's does NOT mean someone is incapable of being "smart" or productive. Here is a college student talking about how he has Asperger's.

Just like the kids I've worked with, eye contact is way off. You'll notice he looks around the room a lot and sometimes makes eye contact with the camera, but I guarantee you he isn't making eye contact with the interviewer for more than a few seconds.

The guy in the video has clearly been through a lot of special help sessions of some sort. He is fully aware and able to describe his condition, but I was hoping for him to give more examples.

It is hard to describe how social situations "wear them out." Like the guy says in the video, he has to piece together everything to make sense of what people are doing socially. When working with Asperger's kids, I have to explain a lot of things to make their day easier. Saying things like "that kid has a chip on his shoulder" will result in a one of my kids asking for Pringles.

Asperger's kids come under attack a lot because they can often perform academically, so people assume there is nothing "wrong" with them. The problem is that same kid that can do the homework before the bell rings for the next class often isn't able to talk about the football game last night. "Small talk" isn't their strong point.

- BG


EDIT: Heh... one of the things I'll do with younger Asperger's kids is make faces that are demonstrative of a given emotion to see if they pick up on it. Sometimes they say the damnest things like, "You're making a face like you ate a lemon, but you haven't been eating lemons!" (He shows that he recognizes a "bad" face but can't begin to fathom why I'm making it.)


Any tips on dealing with Asperger children? I've worked around some of the obsessions. Like disconnected the live well on the boat because along with numbers....buttons are also an obsession.

His parents (my SIL & BIL) are pretty strict and stern with him. I'm not sure if they know or are in denial about it. My wife and I have discussed trying to bring it up. But not sure if it's a good idea.

Is there help out there if he has aspergers?

SCBB

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:44:25 PM EST
No its real. If you meet people with geniune Asbergers you know right off the bat. They are VERY socially awkard. There is more to it than just social skills.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 2:59:40 PM EST
well i have to deal with it all the time. my son has it as well as ocd,.mood disorders,and learning disabilities...... he see therapist,psycho therapist. in home counseling , out patient consolers. it is not real . it is a hell . not only for him but for me as well ..... i have become all too familial with the austict rages...... and the sadness that comes from it all.......

anyone want to discuss it feel free to pm me ... as i can only offer advice and a ear to vent on ..........
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:03:10 PM EST
Does it matter what we call it?

It is a definite "way of being". Some people are truly hard-wired that way. Some of us partially so. Others not at all.

But let there be no doubt but that some brilliantly intelligent, good-hearted, and impeccably honest people are pretty much nonefunctional on account of the "way of being" that is called Aspergers.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:11:37 PM EST
I have a mild form of autism to which a counselor has asked me if anyone has ever diagnosed me as having Asperger's.

That's the explanation for why I can store facts about members on this forum and why I can pull them up very rapidly.

Yes, I have problems with socialization in real life.

It's real. I have known people with autism that were socially withdrawn, people that were extreme social butterflies, and the severe end of the spectrum that has stereotypical and classically manifested behavior(ie, headbanging, rocking) where they couldn't communicate. I'm very lucky that I can actually articulate my thoughts and feelings.

The problem is that people have stereotypical misconceptions on what it is. Hence, why people tend to think that autism/Asperger's isn't real.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:13:49 PM EST
My god-son is autistic. If i had been born in 1989 instead of 1969 I would have been diagnosed Aspergers. My interactions with people are based on rules sets that I've built up over years. New situations are uncomfortable for me until I understand the interactions between people. I hate being in crowds. I have to force myself to look people in the eye. (I usually look at the gap between their eyebrows.)

Aspergers is probably over-diagnosed. But it's easier to say than PDD-NOS, which you then have to explain means Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified. One of my co-workers children was recently diagnosed PDD-NOS. This is probably the mildest position on the Autism spectrum. But when he's telling people about it it takes 10 minutes to explain what it is and how it's different from Autism or Aspergers, etc. To avoid that, I think a lot of people just say Aspergers. Most people know what that is now.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:17:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:19:53 PM EST
I have been diagnosed with Asperger's. I saw a real doctor and everything.

Yes it is definitely real. My childhood was very difficult to get through but I made it.

I still find some things much more difficult than most people but I get through them.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:21:13 PM EST
Yes it is real. I work with several kids with it.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:23:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By Melvinator2k0:
No its real. If you meet people with geniune Asbergers you know right off the bat. They are VERY socially awkard. There is more to it than just social skills.

This.

Making friends IRL is hard. Keeping friends IRL is hard. Dating is hard.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:25:00 PM EST
Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:




I work with kids with Asperger's. To say it's made up in some capacity is simply beyond stupid.


Asperger's does NOT mean someone is incapable of being "smart" or productive. Here is a college student talking about how he has Asperger's.

Just like the kids I've worked with, eye contact is way off. You'll notice he looks around the room a lot and sometimes makes eye contact with the camera, but I guarantee you he isn't making eye contact with the interviewer for more than a few seconds.

The guy in the video has clearly been through a lot of special help sessions of some sort. He is fully aware and able to describe his condition, but I was hoping for him to give more examples.

It is hard to describe how social situations "wear them out." Like the guy says in the video, he has to piece together everything to make sense of what people are doing socially. When working with Asperger's kids, I have to explain a lot of things to make their day easier. Saying things like "that kid has a chip on his shoulder" will result in a one of my kids asking for Pringles.

Asperger's kids come under attack a lot because they can often perform academically, so people assume there is nothing "wrong" with them. The problem is that same kid that can do the homework before the bell rings for the next class often isn't able to talk about the football game last night. "Small talk" isn't their strong point.

- BG


EDIT: Heh... one of the things I'll do with younger Asperger's kids is make faces that are demonstrative of a given emotion to see if they pick up on it. Sometimes they say the damnest things like, "You're making a face like you ate a lemon, but you haven't been eating lemons!" (He shows that he recognizes a "bad" face but can't begin to fathom why I'm making it.)


Spot on description.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:28:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By Deej86:
Originally Posted By Melvinator2k0:
No its real. If you meet people with geniune Asbergers you know right off the bat. They are VERY socially awkard. There is more to it than just social skills.
This.

Making friends IRL is hard. Keeping friends IRL is hard. Dating is hard.

I feel really lucky to have two good friends now.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:29:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 3:32:19 PM EST by sinsir]
the wife is a mental health RN, and we have a friend who's son has it ...... it is real, and yes he is a cool kid when he finaly warms up to you. it took a few years before he would even acknowledge that i was in the room, never mind speak to me. but the kid is a wiz on a computer or with numbers. other then being realy shy and interverted, he's like any other kid his age.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:38:20 PM EST
The problem with people is that they refuse to believe they aren't special.

This leads to some pretty twisted reasoning, where if a person is not successful or popular, it must be because they have some sort of syndrome.

We as a people just need to realize that not everyone gets to be awesome, and most of us don't matter at all. (Oh man, that was emo... Tomorrow I'm going to piss on Lebowski's rug)
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:48:47 PM EST
Real. My son, Daniel has it, and I assure you he is smarter than the lot of you put together. But don't ask for eye contact, or innate inference. To suggest that AS is not "real" is the pinnacle of ignorance.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:52:57 PM EST
One of my nephews has been diagnosed as having Aspergers and he is the demon spawn. I'm not saying anyone else is the demon spawn but this kid is.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:54:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By MikeS369:
One of my nephews has been diagnosed as having Aspergers and he is the demon spawn. I'm not saying anyone else is the demon spawn but this kid is.

How old is he? Kids like this tend to "grow out of it". I did!

Be patient.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:56:19 PM EST
Damn your making me hungry
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 3:58:47 PM EST
Originally Posted By Fearlessleader01:
I've met a few kids with genuine Aspergers.

Its not just a made up condition.


This. If you had asked me before I might have told you it was modern psycho-babble, then I had a kid with a severe case work for me. I've experienced people with a variety of legitimate mental problems when I worked on ambulances and in ER's. This kid was legit.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:00:00 PM EST
I have a friend with Aspergers. There have been times where he would crawl around on his hands and knees in a super market memorizing tile patterns, he also has a sensitivity to sound, and hates youtube because of it.

Real.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:02:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 4:33:22 PM EST by MikeS369]
Originally Posted By max229:

Originally Posted By MikeS369:
One of my nephews has been diagnosed as having Aspergers and he is the demon spawn. I'm not saying anyone else is the demon spawn but this kid is.

How old is he? Kids like this tend to "grow out of it". I did!

Be patient.


I think he's about 13. I know Aspergers is real but I thank God I live a couple thousand miles away from him. His dad is fucked in the head. Not Aspergers though. He has anger problems. And now with my sister and her husband going through a divorce I can only imagine what toll it is going to take on this kid.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:04:37 PM EST
Ummmm. OK. You took a test in Wired and based on that you think....

Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:12:18 PM EST
No––––––––––––––––look at the politics that is a local school system..........

-Mrs. Crabtree can't stand little billy consatly fidgeting and not paying attention and talking during her boring lectures.

so she demands that billy is put in Special ed so he can get out of her room for 2 hours every day––we can't put billy in Spc ed wiith out a diagnosis so the definationsof some of the disorders are broadened––like Autism, and Asburger––this serves several purposes

it makes mrs. crabtree happy

it gets her off the admins back

it justifies the exsistence of school psych-which should be doing more testing of more pressing issues

it either pisses off- or relieves billy's parents

it over loads our Spec Ed class rooms

To under stand look at the symptons of Asburger, Autism, and Post tramadic strss disorter in 1980 and in 2009 you will see huge increases in defintions, and symptons.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:15:51 PM EST
Aspergers is real. It is essentially a subset of the autism spectrum disorder. My older son is either high functioning autism or Aspergers (still awaiting a final diagnosis). I think he does not meet the language skills required for Aspergers, but he is very bright and is definitely not classic full blown autism. Either way, I think the coping skills associated with Aspergers are also good for high functioning autism.

I often just describe his odd behaviors as "He is just being James" or something like that.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:16:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By SD307:
No––––––––––––––––look at the politics that is a local school system..........

-Mrs. Crabtree can't stand little billy consatly fidgeting and not paying attention and talking during her boring lectures.

so she demands that billy is put in Special ed so he can get out of her room for 2 hours every day––we can't put billy in Spc ed wiith out a diagnosis so the definationsof some of the disorders are broadened––like Autism, and Asburger––this serves several purposes

it makes mrs. crabtree happy

it gets her off the admins back

it justifies the exsistence of school psych-which should be doing more testing of more pressing issues

it either pisses off- or relieves billy's parents

it over loads our Spec Ed class rooms

To under stand look at the symptons of Asburger, Autism, and Post tramadic strss disorter in 1980 and in 2009 you will see huge increases in defintions, and symptons.

Over diagnosing something does not remove the legitimacy of those who actually have the condition.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:19:07 PM EST
It should be noted that the vast majority of the "psychological tests" in magazines and websites are pretty much worthless.

That being said, the DSM-IV-TR contains diagnostic criteria for Asperger's Disorder.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:19:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2009 4:23:25 PM EST by cool_story_bro]
My cousin has asbergeres, its definitely a real thing. It's not just nerdiness, he just doesn't understand how to interact with people and can't pick up on verbal or physical cues. I'm really not trying to sound like a dick but hang out with someone who has it and you'll know its real in about 5 minutes. is it over diagnosed? I have no idea


ETA: he is a total nerd, but I think that's because he has asbergers and people don't like him so he turns to his computers stuff
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:24:55 PM EST
We have a friend with asbergeres. The kid is a fu*king genius. But he can't handle much socially.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:27:32 PM EST
While I think the syndrome is real, it is over diagnosed and has huge overlay with just being an a-hole.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:30:49 PM EST
It is a real condition.
Take this tet http://www.gay-test.com/and let me know how it turns out.
Link Posted: 9/16/2009 4:32:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By JBlitzen:
Or is it just a pointless characterization of a certain type of nerd?

I took that test in Wired which says that a score of 16 out of, I think, 50, is average, and got a 37, but it all sounds like it describes a normal introvert.


Asperger syndrome is the new Autism. Parents are looking to explain bad behavior and lousy grades out of their kids and its a great excuse. Too many cases are the parent making the diagnosis. JMHO.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top