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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/2/2006 3:26:31 PM EDT
Something I said in the "cop shoots airman" thread got me thinking, so I went and looked up some numbers. We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.

Last year in NYC, there were two police officers killed in the line of duty. There were 515 other murders in the city. There are between 38,000 and 55,000 officers in the NYPD according to my quick research. If someone else knows, please chime in. Since I don't have the right number apparently, I will average the two I found, and use 46,500 as my number. NYC has a population of 8,000,000.

So, let's run the numbers:

Chance of a cop being killed: 1 in 23,250

Chance of a non-cop being killed: 1 in 15,533

We can even up the ante a bit if we remember that of the two cops killed in 2005, one of them was killed off duty while investigating a disturbance near his house, with no body armor, an insufficient hold-out piece, and no backup.

Thoughts?

Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:40:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Something I said in the "cop shoots airman" thread got me thinking, so I went and looked up some numbers. We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.

Last year in NYC, there were two police officers killed in the line of duty. There were 515 other murders in the city. There are between 38,000 and 55,000 officers in the NYPD according to my quick research. If someone else knows, please chime in. Since I don't have the right number apparently, I will average the two I found, and use 46,500 as my number. NYC has a population of 8,000,000.

So, let's run the numbers:

Chance of a cop being killed: 1 in 23,250

Chance of a non-cop being killed: 1 in 15,533

We can even up the ante a bit if we remember that of the two cops killed in 2005, one of them was killed off duty while investigating a disturbance near his house, with no body armor, an insufficient hold-out piece, and no backup.

Thoughts?




Cops are off duty 3/4 of the time too, and you data does not account for that. Cops are in the same list as non-cops, 3/4 of the time. Your data does not account for the potentially dangerous situations cops get in as a direct result of the job.

How about you compare death rates per potentially violent encounter, or death rates per traffic stop, or death rates per domestic disturbance handled.....
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 5:49:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By txinvestigator:

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Something I said in the "cop shoots airman" thread got me thinking, so I went and looked up some numbers. We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.

Last year in NYC, there were two police officers killed in the line of duty. There were 515 other murders in the city. There are between 38,000 and 55,000 officers in the NYPD according to my quick research. If someone else knows, please chime in. Since I don't have the right number apparently, I will average the two I found, and use 46,500 as my number. NYC has a population of 8,000,000.

So, let's run the numbers:

Chance of a cop being killed: 1 in 23,250

Chance of a non-cop being killed: 1 in 15,533

We can even up the ante a bit if we remember that of the two cops killed in 2005, one of them was killed off duty while investigating a disturbance near his house, with no body armor, an insufficient hold-out piece, and no backup.

Thoughts?




Cops are off duty 3/4 of the time too, and you data does not account for that. Cops are in the same list as non-cops, 3/4 of the time. Your data does not account for the potentially dangerous situations cops get in as a direct result of the job.

How about you compare death rates per potentially violent encounter, or death rates per traffic stop, or death rates per domestic disturbance handled.....



My data does take into account those factors, because even getting into potentially dangerous situations for 1/4 of the time, they end up murdered less often than members of the general public, but when they are killed off duty, like the one I mentioned, they count in the dead cops total, not the dead non-cops total.

These numbers are only for NYC, I don't know about the rest of the country.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:02:29 PM EDT
I see your statistics, but what does that have to do with officer safety in the way you refer to it?


We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.


Are you suggesting that because of these statistics, LE shouldn't be concerned with officer safety?



Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:07:17 PM EDT
Funny, because cops are the armed ones and yet they are relatively more unsafe.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:07:51 PM EDT
The dangers of policing are greatly exagerated. There are many more dangerous occupations than policing.

Look up OSHA stats and FBI murder stats, cops are no where near the top of the list of dangerous jobs.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:10:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Funny, because cops are the armed ones and yet they are relatively more unsafe.

Other way around.

Cops are less likely than non-cops to be killed in NYC.

So do they think being unarmed has made NYC folks safer?

Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:15:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:17:54 PM EDT
Just an aside to the Cop bashing that this thread is headed towards but death statistics are only a minor portion of total LEO safety stats. You might want to also look at non-fatal Officer injuries from shootings, auto accidents, assaults, etc. compared to other occupations.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:27:36 PM EDT
We've been over this before. Being a cop for the most part is less dangerous than simply living in many states or urban areas. That doesn't take away from the great services they provide the community. However, it does imply the few cops that justify their illegal behavior by claiming that "their jobs are so dangerous they need to do it to stay alive" are full of shit.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:29:26 PM EDT
LEO's are less likely to be killed because they take those precautions grouped into the "officer safety" category. That and their training keeps them from making mistakes that could get them killed.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:39:35 PM EDT
I wonder how this thread will turn out?
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:39:51 PM EDT
Do those death stats include soldiers in time of war?


Originally Posted By shogun187:
I see your statistics, but what does that have to do with officer safety in the way you refer to it?


We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.


Are you suggesting that because of these statistics, LE shouldn't be concerned with officer safety?



No, my suggestion is that politicians should stop stumping for laws that restrict the freedoms of law abiding citizens under the banner of "officer safety" such as the anti-gun nonsense we got here in NY when the two officers were killed in late 2005.

I didn't mean it as a cop bashing thread. The majority of my interactions with the police have been cordial, except for the one who nearly had a brain hemmorage while screaming at me. He was mad because I flipped him off for flying up onto my bumper at 30mph over my own speed, at 10:00 at night. He did not have his roof lights on, I thought he was just some asshole. I ended up with a ticket, but beat it in court when the judge said "I guess I would have done the same thing"
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:41:33 PM EDT
Policing is a field that is more dangerous than most, but certinally not all. We frequently find ourselves in dangerous or potentially dangeros situations. Fights, domestics, "Routine" traffic stops, high speed driving to emergency calls, high speed pursuits, etc.

If a police officer puts in 20 years, its not a matter of if you will be hurt, but rather when and how bad. I have been a patrolman in my current agency for not quite 2 years. I have been injured in three seperate incidents that immediatly come to mind. None of the injuries were overly serious or required much medical care. Scrapes, bruises, cuts, chipped tooth, things like that. Generally from fighting with suspects. In the time I have been here I have been involved in 2 high speed pursuits. Both of those had all kinds of potential for injury - mainly to myself or my fellow officers - or the suspects - as they were both at night.


So while the actual numbers might not be too shockingly high, there is far more potential for injury than in most other professions. The fact that injuries aren't through the roof is more due to professionalism and training than any lack of danger.


-K
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:45:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By txinvestigator:

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Something I said in the "cop shoots airman" thread got me thinking, so I went and looked up some numbers. We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.

Last year in NYC, there were two police officers killed in the line of duty. There were 515 other murders in the city. There are between 38,000 and 55,000 officers in the NYPD according to my quick research. If someone else knows, please chime in. Since I don't have the right number apparently, I will average the two I found, and use 46,500 as my number. NYC has a population of 8,000,000.

So, let's run the numbers:

Chance of a cop being killed: 1 in 23,250

Chance of a non-cop being killed: 1 in 15,533

We can even up the ante a bit if we remember that of the two cops killed in 2005, one of them was killed off duty while investigating a disturbance near his house, with no body armor, an insufficient hold-out piece, and no backup.

Thoughts?




Cops are off duty 3/4 of the time too, and you data does not account for that. Cops are in the same list as non-cops, 3/4 of the time. Your data does not account for the potentially dangerous situations cops get in as a direct result of the job.

How about you compare death rates per potentially violent encounter, or death rates per traffic stop, or death rates per domestic disturbance handled.....



IIRC the dept of labor stats does not show law enforcement to be any more dangerous than most other jobs. It just gets hyped a lot.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:46:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
money.cnn.com/2003/10/13/pf/dangerousjobs/dangerous2.gif



No one knows it more than me. Planerench out.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:47:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheFreepster:
We've been over this before. Being a cop for the most part is less dangerous than simply living in many states or urban areas. That doesn't take away from the great services they provide the community. However, it does imply the few cops that justify their illegal behavior by claiming that "their jobs are so dangerous they need to do it to stay alive" are full of shit.



Well put, sir.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:54:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Special-K:
Policing is a field that is more dangerous than most, but certinally not all. We frequently find ourselves in dangerous or potentially dangeros situations. Fights, domestics, "Routine" traffic stops, high speed driving to emergency calls, high speed pursuits, etc.

If a police officer puts in 20 years, its not a matter of if you will be hurt, but rather when and how bad. I have been a patrolman in my current agency for not quite 2 years. I have been injured in three seperate incidents that immediatly come to mind. None of the injuries were overly serious or required much medical care. Scrapes, bruises, cuts, chipped tooth, things like that. Generally from fighting with suspects. In the time I have been here I have been involved in 2 high speed pursuits. Both of those had all kinds of potential for injury - mainly to myself or my fellow officers - or the suspects - as they were both at night.


So while the actual numbers might not be too shockingly high, there is far more potential for injury than in most other professions. The fact that injuries aren't through the roof is more due to professionalism and training than any lack of danger.


-K



Not to detract from the job you perform, but in a high speed pursuit you are running lights and siren sometimes with the benefit of multiple officers in a pack and traffic signals being triggered in your favor. As far as bodily injury from scuffles, I'll grant that it is more romantic to chip a tooth in a fist fight than to fry the skin off your ankle from welding slag but the death stats just don't back up the officer safety mantra that is trumpeted over every anti-gun law (mg's included) or officer exemption from law. Again, I work with LE all the time and they are a great bunch, but in reality I have a far greater chance of biting it flying overhead assisting them than they do on the ground. Training and proceedure do account for much of the current level of safety.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 7:00:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Planerench:
Not to detract from the job you perform, but in a high speed pursuit you are running lights and siren sometimes with the benefit of multiple officers in a pack and traffic signals being triggered in your favor.

- Here it is typically only two patrol cars authorized to chase a suspect vehicle and we don't have any means of triggering traffic lights to our advantage.



As far as bodily injury from scuffles, I'll grant that it is more romantic to chip a tooth in a fist fight than to fry the skin off your ankle from welding slag but the death stats just don't back up the officer safety mantra that is trumpeted over every anti-gun law (mg's included) or officer exemption from law. Again, I work with LE all the time and they are a great bunch, but in reality I have a far greater chance of biting it flying overhead assisting them than they do on the ground. Training and proceedure do account for much of the current level of safety.
- Officer safety goes far behind simply looking at the number of deaths in a profession.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 7:19:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NCPatrolAR:

Originally Posted By Planerench:
Not to detract from the job you perform, but in a high speed pursuit you are running lights and siren sometimes with the benefit of multiple officers in a pack and traffic signals being triggered in your favor.

- Here it is typically only two patrol cars authorized to chase a suspect vehicle and we don't have any means of triggering traffic lights to our advantage.



As far as bodily injury from scuffles, I'll grant that it is more romantic to chip a tooth in a fist fight than to fry the skin off your ankle from welding slag but the death stats just don't back up the officer safety mantra that is trumpeted over every anti-gun law (mg's included) or officer exemption from law. Again, I work with LE all the time and they are a great bunch, but in reality I have a far greater chance of biting it flying overhead assisting them than they do on the ground. Training and proceedure do account for much of the current level of safety.
- Officer safety goes far behind simply looking at the number of deaths in a profession.



I work in and outside of aircraft every day and my job is more dangerous than most.

By the numbers, I have a 1 in 1000 chance of dying every year, probably much more so, since my exposure is higher than most skydivers. I dont run around saying it, that's the first time I've posted those stats.

It just bugs me when people say cops jobs are so dangerous when, in fact, they aren't. It gets published over and over but it just isnt true. Sure there's danger, but not out of proportion to other professions.

Dont get me wrong, I appreciate what the police do, my Dad was a cop, but the whole danger of the job thing is pushed way out of proportion.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 12:18:16 AM EDT
I get the feeling that this thread is showing opposition to increased gun laws proposed under the "officer safety" umbrella. For what it's worth, I do not support any legislation that makes it more difficult for law abiding citizens to purchase or carry firearms everywhere they go. I treat everyone I come in contact with as if they were armed so it really makes little difference to me whether they are or not. I have always encouraged people that I talk to to purchase, receive training on and carry firearms. The more citizens that carry, the less inclined dirtbags are to seek out a victim. The vast majority of officers that I know feel the same way I do on this topic.

The liberal idiots jump on the "officer safety" bandwagon because it comes across as a noble reason to enact stricter gun policy and few politicians are going to stand at the podium and say that they don't care about officer safety. I personally think it's B.S. and think these people should rot.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:00:49 AM EDT
Of the top 10 dangerous jobs, how many of those deaths are due to another persons willful conduct to kill that timber cutter, fisher or pilot?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:15:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
The dangers of policing are greatly exagerated. There are many more dangerous occupations than policing.




Like farmer. Consistently one of the most dangerous jobs there is.

Which job is more important?
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:18:00 AM EDT
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS MOST AT RISK FOR WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

College and University Faculty Members Have Lowest Rates

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. residents suffered an annual average of 1.7 million violent workplace victimizations between 1993 and 1999, the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. In addition to those non-fatal workplace crimes against people 12 years old and older, there were about 900 workplace-related homicides annually during those years, according to the new BJS study. Workplace violence accounted for 18 percent of all violent crime during the seven-year period.

Of the occupations examined, police officers experienced such crimes at the highest rate (260.8 per 1,000 police officers), whereas college or university professors and teachers had the lowest rate (1.6 per 1,000 teachers). Government employees had violent victimization rates (28.6 per 1,000 government worker) that were higher than those people who work for private companies (9.9 per 1,000 workers) or self-employed people (7.4 per 1,000).

Rates for the 1993-1999 period for selected occupations as measured by BJS' National Crime Victimization Survey were as follows:

Occupation Average Annual Rate
per 1,000 Workers

Law enforcement officers 260.8
Corrections officers 155.7
Taxicab drivers 128.3
Bartenders 81.6
Mental health custodians 69.0
Special education teachers 68.4
Gas station attendants 68.3
Mental health professionals 68.2
Junior high school teachers 54.2
Convenience store workers 53.9
Bus drivers 38.2
High school teachers 38.1
Nurses 21.9
Physicians 16.2
All workers 12.6
College teachers 1.6

The non-fatal workplace crime rate declined 44 percent from 1993 through 1999, and the number of workplace homicides fell 39 percent during the same period.

White workers experienced workplace victimization (13.0 per 1,000 workers) at a rate 25 percent higher than blacks (10.4 per 1,000 blacks) and 59 percent higher than for other races (8.2 per 1,000 such workers). About 60 percent of workplace violence against whites and blacks was committed by offenders of the same race as the victim.

Almost one in eight victimized workers were injured during the act of violence, about one in nine faced multiple offenders and about four in 10 had a prior relationship with the offender. In about 11 percent of the workplace homicides the offender was a coworker, former coworker or a customer. About three-quarters of all workplace violence was committed by unarmed offenders, but more than 80 percent of the workplace homicides were committed with firearms.

The BJS special report, "Violence in the Workplace, 1993-99" (NCJ-190076) was written by BJS statistician Detis T. Duhart. After the release date it will be available at:

www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/press/vw99pr.htm

Because cops fight back.............................

Not because they aren't in a dangerous job.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:37:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Henny:
Of the top 10 dangerous jobs, how many of those deaths are due to another persons willful conduct to kill that timber cutter, fisher or pilot?



Does it matter? The source of the hazard is irrelevant to the amount of danger.

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:44:40 AM EDT
If you're trying to argue against gun control in the name of officer safety, this is the wrong way to do it. By talking about how safe officers really are, you have implicitly accepted the premise that gun control would make officers safer, and you get mired down in irrelevant arguments about how dangerous police work is compared to other professions.

Attack the premise of the argument instead - gun control doesn't make officers safer, because the people who follow the gun control laws aren't a threat to cops, and the people who are a threat already ignore the law.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:55:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Garand_Shooter:

Originally Posted By Henny:
Of the top 10 dangerous jobs, how many of those deaths are due to another persons willful conduct to kill that timber cutter, fisher or pilot?



Does it matter? The source of the hazard is irrelevant to the amount of danger.




I agree, in the end you still end up dead. I'm not disputing the danger of the listed jobs. Indeed they are dangerous. I'm just bringing up the point of the mechanics of death. There are many times cops are killed just because they are a cop. Not many felons start their day out by saying "I'm gonna go out and smoke me a roofer today." The majority of the jobs listed it would appear to me that the people are killed by "things". IE electrical current, falls, equipment failures. Many times cops are killed by people. Up close, gritty, disturbing, felonious deaths.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 5:35:14 AM EDT
Officer Safety is a very broad coverage for many reasons. I think in order to show how it's use has evolved we need to look at the past history. All Officers have given some and some have given all. It is the ones that have given all who provide the majority of the basis for our current actions. Monday morning quarter backing is so common in many professions where life, liberty, and money are at stake (that should cover nearly every job). Through evaluation of the event, policies and training are modified. Hence now we use officer safety as a broad reason for many actions. Due to the willful intent and knowledge of some criminals we all (yes me to) have to suffer from some knee jerk reactions of government. We see it from gun control to helmet laws.

I believe the vast majority of the public will never have a negative interaction with the police. But if one is in violation of the law they will have contact and the chain of events is dictated by the type of law violation and/or their reaction to law enforcement commands. Handcuffs can always be removed after an investigative detention if no crime is truly afoote, but to apply them during a fight can increase the odds somebody is going to get hurt.

Above all else we are human and there will be mistakes made. To avoid or prevent mistakes we need to look at the past, modify training, and put forth every bit of effort possible in life. We all have to opportunity to effect change and the manner in how we conduct our everyday life is the beginning.

Mike


Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:25:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Special-K:
Policing is a field that is more dangerous than most, but certinally not all. We frequently find ourselves in dangerous or potentially dangeros situations. Fights, domestics, "Routine" traffic stops, high speed driving to emergency calls, high speed pursuits, etc.

If a police officer puts in 20 years, its not a matter of if you will be hurt, but rather when and how bad. I have been a patrolman in my current agency for not quite 2 years. I have been injured in three seperate incidents that immediatly come to mind. None of the injuries were overly serious or required much medical care. Scrapes, bruises, cuts, chipped tooth, things like that. Generally from fighting with suspects. In the time I have been here I have been involved in 2 high speed pursuits. Both of those had all kinds of potential for injury - mainly to myself or my fellow officers - or the suspects - as they were both at night.


So while the actual numbers might not be too shockingly high, there is far more potential for injury than in most other professions. The fact that injuries aren't through the roof is more due to professionalism and training than any lack of danger.


-K



Quite whining.

As an aircraft mechanic, I couldn't go a day of working without getting cuts and scrapes. all part of the job, along with the ever present chance of an accident happening that could get me killed, like getting crushed doing a landing gear test, or doing a low power, and having the jet explode. You take your chances in any job. Just because you CHOSE to be a cop doesn't make you any more special that the guy that chooses to be a garbageman (which probably has a higher incident rate than cops).

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:37:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS MOST AT RISK FOR WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

College and University Faculty Members Have Lowest Rates

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. residents suffered an annual average of 1.7 million violent workplace victimizations between 1993 and 1999, the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. In addition to those non-fatal workplace crimes against people 12 years old and older, there were about 900 workplace-related homicides annually during those years, according to the new BJS study. Workplace violence accounted for 18 percent of all violent crime during the seven-year period.

Of the occupations examined, police officers experienced such crimes at the highest rate (260.8 per 1,000 police officers), whereas college or university professors and teachers had the lowest rate (1.6 per 1,000 teachers). Government employees had violent victimization rates (28.6 per 1,000 government worker) that were higher than those people who work for private companies (9.9 per 1,000 workers) or self-employed people (7.4 per 1,000).

Rates for the 1993-1999 period for selected occupations as measured by BJS' National Crime Victimization Survey were as follows:

Occupation Average Annual Rate
per 1,000 Workers

Law enforcement officers 260.8
Corrections officers 155.7
Taxicab drivers 128.3
Bartenders 81.6
Mental health custodians 69.0
Special education teachers 68.4
Gas station attendants 68.3
Mental health professionals 68.2
Junior high school teachers 54.2
Convenience store workers 53.9
Bus drivers 38.2
High school teachers 38.1
Nurses 21.9
Physicians 16.2
All workers 12.6
College teachers 1.6

The non-fatal workplace crime rate declined 44 percent from 1993 through 1999, and the number of workplace homicides fell 39 percent during the same period.

White workers experienced workplace victimization (13.0 per 1,000 workers) at a rate 25 percent higher than blacks (10.4 per 1,000 blacks) and 59 percent higher than for other races (8.2 per 1,000 such workers). About 60 percent of workplace violence against whites and blacks was committed by offenders of the same race as the victim.

Almost one in eight victimized workers were injured during the act of violence, about one in nine faced multiple offenders and about four in 10 had a prior relationship with the offender. In about 11 percent of the workplace homicides the offender was a coworker, former coworker or a customer. About three-quarters of all workplace violence was committed by unarmed offenders, but more than 80 percent of the workplace homicides were committed with firearms.

The BJS special report, "Violence in the Workplace, 1993-99" (NCJ-190076) was written by BJS statistician Detis T. Duhart. After the release date it will be available at:

www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/press/vw99pr.htm

Because cops fight back.............................

Not because they aren't in a dangerous job.



There you go again, injecting statistics and logic where they have no place and don't belong.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 6:52:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TxLawDog:

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS MOST AT RISK FOR WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

College and University Faculty Members Have Lowest Rates

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. residents suffered an annual average of 1.7 million violent workplace victimizations between 1993 and 1999, the Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. In addition to those non-fatal workplace crimes against people 12 years old and older, there were about 900 workplace-related homicides annually during those years, according to the new BJS study. Workplace violence accounted for 18 percent of all violent crime during the seven-year period.

Of the occupations examined, police officers experienced such crimes at the highest rate (260.8 per 1,000 police officers), whereas college or university professors and teachers had the lowest rate (1.6 per 1,000 teachers). Government employees had violent victimization rates (28.6 per 1,000 government worker) that were higher than those people who work for private companies (9.9 per 1,000 workers) or self-employed people (7.4 per 1,000).

Rates for the 1993-1999 period for selected occupations as measured by BJS' National Crime Victimization Survey were as follows:

Occupation Average Annual Rate
per 1,000 Workers

Law enforcement officers 260.8
Corrections officers 155.7
Taxicab drivers 128.3
Bartenders 81.6
Mental health custodians 69.0
Special education teachers 68.4
Gas station attendants 68.3
Mental health professionals 68.2
Junior high school teachers 54.2
Convenience store workers 53.9
Bus drivers 38.2
High school teachers 38.1
Nurses 21.9
Physicians 16.2
All workers 12.6
College teachers 1.6

The non-fatal workplace crime rate declined 44 percent from 1993 through 1999, and the number of workplace homicides fell 39 percent during the same period.

White workers experienced workplace victimization (13.0 per 1,000 workers) at a rate 25 percent higher than blacks (10.4 per 1,000 blacks) and 59 percent higher than for other races (8.2 per 1,000 such workers). About 60 percent of workplace violence against whites and blacks was committed by offenders of the same race as the victim.

Almost one in eight victimized workers were injured during the act of violence, about one in nine faced multiple offenders and about four in 10 had a prior relationship with the offender. In about 11 percent of the workplace homicides the offender was a coworker, former coworker or a customer. About three-quarters of all workplace violence was committed by unarmed offenders, but more than 80 percent of the workplace homicides were committed with firearms.

The BJS special report, "Violence in the Workplace, 1993-99" (NCJ-190076) was written by BJS statistician Detis T. Duhart. After the release date it will be available at:

www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/press/vw99pr.htm

Because cops fight back.............................

Not because they aren't in a dangerous job.



There you go again, injecting statistics and logic where they have no place and don't belong.


Well gee you think a cop has more chance of workplace violence? Consider the workplace. I'm sure as a percentage cops suffer from assault more than the general public.

I have found it absolutely amazing that police officers aren't in the top 10 most deadly jobs. Speaks to the training and professionalism of over 99% of our police forces.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 7:04:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheSneak:
Something I said in the "cop shoots airman" thread got me thinking, so I went and looked up some numbers. We keep hearing that this or that is important for officer safety etc... so here it is.

Last year in NYC, there were two police officers killed in the line of duty. There were 515 other murders in the city. There are between 38,000 and 55,000 officers in the NYPD according to my quick research. If someone else knows, please chime in. Since I don't have the right number apparently, I will average the two I found, and use 46,500 as my number. NYC has a population of 8,000,000.

So, let's run the numbers:

Chance of a cop being killed: 1 in 23,250

Chance of a non-cop being killed: 1 in 15,533

We can even up the ante a bit if we remember that of the two cops killed in 2005, one of them was killed off duty while investigating a disturbance near his house, with no body armor, an insufficient hold-out piece, and no backup.

Thoughts?




I'd like to see these statistics but controlling for criminal behavior. Most murders are, IIRC, gangbangers taking each other out. Cull anyone who has a felony or is part of a gang and I'd be curious to see what happens.

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 7:14:24 AM EDT
Interesting statistics regarding LEO safety

It's interesting that with a thread title like this you immediately got to officer deaths.

Then someone post "10 most dangerous jobs" and there is a chart with the DEATH RATE for people invloved in those jobs.

Safety, and conversely danger, has more to it than just death.

Link Posted: 2/3/2006 8:41:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:
Interesting statistics regarding LEO safety

It's interesting that with a thread title like this you immediately got to officer deaths.

Then someone post "10 most dangerous jobs" and there is a chart with the DEATH RATE for people invloved in those jobs.

Safety, and conversely danger, has more to it than just death.




Well, "officer involved in fisticuffs" doesn't get on the news and get the politicians jumping on the anti-gun bandwagon the way "officer shot with deadly armor piercing teflon black talon hollowpoint cop killer bullets" does.
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