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Posted: 10/21/2004 10:30:37 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:37:21 PM EST
interesting link......

so....they say titanium can be machined as easily as stainless steel, huh?


they forget to mention that stainles steel isn't exactly the most forgiving material to work with either
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:41:46 PM EST
More interesting info....

www.supraalloys.com/Index-Ti-Technical.htm

BTW, this is the company that was founded by the gentleman who took out the $114K Washinton Post full page pro-republican ad.

S.O.
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:43:59 PM EST
I have ADD, wheres the cliff notes?
Link Posted: 10/21/2004 10:45:00 PM EST
Those ARE the cliff notes.

S.O.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 5:57:24 AM EST
I tried machining a couple receivers out of Ti for a winchester 52 and a Remington 700 copy. Didn't work out. Shoulda used stainless.

Ti is wicked stuff to cut. you need *sharp* HSS drill bits and endmills and it cuts just fine. If your work gets hot or your bit gets dull, your cutting surface gets harder than the gates of hell just like that and you are screwed. Like the article said, Poor heat transfer. Lots of cutting oil and waiting involved for it to cool.

But really, you just have to adapt your methods to the material. The difference is the same as cutting aluminum and trying your hand at steel.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 6:39:35 AM EST
Ti is a lot cheaper today than it was 20 years ago, because 100% of it is imported into the USA. The old Soviet Union produced a good portion of the world's supply. Since the Soviet's fall, Russia is now a major world-wide producer of that mineral. There is so much of that Ti around, that they are starting to manufacture crow bars out of Ti. Ruger(as in Ruger guns) has developed from hi-tech lost-wax casting techniques for cutting the cost of fabricating Ti by producing a casting that is nearly 95% of the final shape.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 6:51:50 AM EST
about 7 years ago i emailed every firearm manf i could find asking why nobody was making titanium guns.

some ignored me. some didn't have a clue.

1 guy said he made some for an intel agency back in the day, but they were basically disposable.

those that answered uniformly said that it was to hard to machine and the softness of the metal made it unsuitable.

less than 2 years later i held my 1st titanium gun.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 7:04:17 AM EST
Titanium arf receivers?
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 7:07:00 AM EST
Thanks for the links! Great information.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 7:14:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By druncuncas:
about 7 years ago i emailed every firearm manf i could find asking why nobody was making titanium guns.

some ignored me. some didn't have a clue.

1 guy said he made some for an intel agency back in the day, but they were basically disposable.

those that answered uniformly said that it was to hard to machine and the softness of the metal made it unsuitable.

less than 2 years later i held my 1st titanium gun.


Realize this, Ti is good, but there are still limitations. Only in past few years that Ti alloys was cheap and strong enough for guns. There are probably Ti alloys to handle the stress of firearms frames, but unfortunately it was too expensive. With the break-up of the Soviet Union, technology to make Ti suitable for firearms frame became available.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 10:56:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2004 11:01:23 AM EST by Zak-Smith]
Commander built on a Caspian titanium frame
[ link to LARGER image ]
[ link to LARGER image ]

Lighter than a Combat Commander, but won't crack like a aluminum Commander.

Caspian sells these for about the same price as a barstock steel frame.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 11:34:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Titanium arf receivers?




Olympic makes them.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 12:23:22 PM EST
That is a very clean Commander. The reciever is 300 bucks, compared to 155 for a regular reciever.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 12:25:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By pogo:
That is a very clean Commander. The reciever is 300 bucks, compared to 155 for a regular reciever.


When they used to sell steel barstock frames, they were around $300 too. The Ti frame is cast and then machined,

-z
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 12:28:01 PM EST
At some point, I'll show you guys some of the research I'm working on with titanium based structurally active/shape memory alloy thin films.

Nifty stuff.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 12:34:17 PM EST
Having a gun (the AR15 for example) made out of titanium is stupid.

The AR15 was designed to be made out of aluminum, not titanium. Making a titanium AR15 using aluminum AR15 specs does not make use of titaniums strengths. Just like making an AR15 out od stainless steel.

But a titanium based AR15 would be cool.
Link Posted: 10/22/2004 12:44:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2004 12:46:09 PM EST by the1_roadrunner]
The key to machining Ti is to keep a chip load at all times. If you're tool is in contact with the material it must be feeding. DO NOT dwell. It will work harden in a second (from friction generated heat). Once that happens the only way to move forward is to get undet the hardspot. Doing that can be prohibitive if it's a drilled hole or a deeper cut will undercut the finish dimension. Also all tools must have positive rake and plenty of relief. Never use a cyclindrically ground tap. Taps must have relief such as a Skrew-Shear type. Tricky stuff really. Not for the beginner by any means. --RR
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