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Posted: 11/20/2016 12:54:50 PM EST
I've never canned food but today I watched a random vid and It seems like something I'd like to try & get in the family. I've seen the occasional thread here and elsewhere. Pickled Eggs, etc.

Could you suggest a good pressure canner? I see some on AMZ for 75$. Don't know if these are trash, etc.

Just need a good starting point.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 1:32:48 PM EST
The top of the line (imho) is the All American Pressure Canner.

I got my No.7, (15 qt.) used on ebay, new prices can be intimidating.

For reference, pickled eggs don't need a canner, just peeled eggs, brine, container and time.

Here's a link to a really good pickled egg thread.
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_17/635594_Pickled_Eggs_as_Survival_Preps__How_to___Picture_Intense_.html
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 1:53:00 PM EST
That's a great thread on eggs, hard to believe it was six years ago.
I was watching a vid on canning chicken, and it seemed like something worth a shot.
Price on those All-Americans are a bit tight on my budget. I'll look on eBay, Craigslist etc.
Pressure cookers were tossed back when I was a kid, after my aunt had a kitchen disaster with one.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 1:57:33 PM EST
I have the big Presto with dial.

I can some deer meat every year. Very convenient for whipping up some quick stew or chili, since its already cooked and tender.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 2:00:06 PM EST
My wife cans with a rattle top pressure cooker. Probably cost $30 and works just fine.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:20:43 PM EST
I can with the one linked below. It works fine for me with the small amount of canning I currently do. Someday I'll get an All-American. I've used them and I like the dial, the lack of a gasket, and the overall quality.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Presto-16-Quart-Aluminum-Pressure-Canner/5913467
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:24:53 PM EST
A big Presto will serve you well. No need of spending mucho dinero.

Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:26:53 PM EST
Whatever you get, make sure you get the latest Ball Canning guide to go with it.

If you follow the directions to the letter then your finished product will be safe and stable.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:30:47 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:32:27 PM EST
Get a pressure canner I can do everything a regular canner can plus what it can't
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:42:22 PM EST
The Presto 22 quart has served us well. It will hold 7 quarts or 18 pints. I have often wished it would hold more as each batch takes so long. I've seen that one of the All American canners can hold 16 quarts, but it is $300, so the Presto is just fine.

I had never heard of canning meat untill I met my wife. It seemed weird, but now we can beef, pork, chicken, turkey, and sausage. Dinners are quick, half the work is already done, just send one of the kids down for a pint of whichever.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:43:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Whatever you get, make sure you get the latest Ball Canning guide to go with it.

If you follow the directions to the letter then your finished product will be safe and stable.
View Quote


Just like reloading, careful with any shortcuts. Mom and wife , cooking and canning all their life. some people are terrified of pressure cookers.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:51:07 PM EST
Only one answer, get an American
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 3:56:21 PM EST
Wife used a Walmart special for years, I bought her an all American canner for Christmas and gave it to her early because I shot dinner a few weeks ago and she wanted to get it canned. She said shell never use the cheap one again because the all American was so easy to use. No rubber gaskets and gets to pressure pretty quick.

21qt model, holds 7 quart jars if I remember. The quality really surprised me. Ran ~200 bucks on amazon I think.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:19:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Whatever you get, make sure you get the latest Ball Canning guide to go with it.

If you follow the directions to the letter then your finished product will be safe and stable.
View Quote


This! Start with the basics and follow directions. Get to know the process before you begin. Have the additional necessary tools (not many but what there are, are very helpful). Prep is all important: the actual 'canning' is the least of the work/problem. Once you start and if you have good results, it is not only a good 'skills level' experience but a life long endeavor. Just think for a moment: no power - no refrigeration - no long term storage other than ..... wait for it ..... canning and dehydrating. Learn this skill and you'll be way ahead of the curve ........
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:30:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By arizonajeff:
Only one answer, get an American
View Quote


Yep. You'll never need another one.

My dad has one that is at least 50 years old and my GF just bought a new one last year for herself.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:38:49 PM EST
I ordered the book and watched some youtube this afternoon.
One thing I've learned is that you do not want to eat from the jar, but heat again first.
Too risky to eat cold, right? (I have no exp with home canning)
So the idea of packing a pint jar in your lunch box is definitely a no-go.
Still great idea for cooking at home.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:39:23 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 50-140:
The top of the line (imho) is the All American Pressure Canner.

I got my No.7, (15 qt.) used on ebay, new prices can be intimidating.

For reference, pickled eggs don't need a canner, just peeled eggs, brine, container and time.

Here's a link to a really good pickled egg thread.
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_17/635594_Pickled_Eggs_as_Survival_Preps__How_to___Picture_Intense_.html
View Quote


In Germany I really loved the Nord Sea pickled herring with sliced eggs and onions on brotchen sandwich.
I'm thinking these would be great sandwich addition to smoked meats or sausage sandwich of some kind.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:41:59 PM EST
I've never messed with the pressure canners, I use the same one my grandmother had since probably before I was born, lol. No one in my family wanted it or would use it, all I had to buy was my jars. Made some great pickles and cantaloupe jelly for practice, never used a canner for pickled eggs as they never last long enough.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 4:42:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By paul463:


Yep. You'll never need another one.

My dad has one that is at least 50 years old and my GF just bought a new one last year for herself.
http://thebestpressurecookers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/All-American-921-21-1-2-Quart-Pressure-Cooker-Canner.jpg
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By paul463:
Originally Posted By arizonajeff:
Only one answer, get an American


Yep. You'll never need another one.

My dad has one that is at least 50 years old and my GF just bought a new one last year for herself.
http://thebestpressurecookers.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/All-American-921-21-1-2-Quart-Pressure-Cooker-Canner.jpg


Yep. If it's good enough for grandma, it's good enough for my wife.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 5:03:47 PM EST
Make sure it at least has a juggler. You don't want to have to babysit it and constantly have to make adjustments.

Both is better though. I have an all American 921 and old national #7 that I refurbished with all American vent tube and jiggler.

Nothing better than home canned meat!
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 5:13:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Threefingers:
I ordered the book and watched some youtube this afternoon.
One thing I've learned is that you do not want to eat from the jar, but heat again first.
Too risky to eat cold, right? (I have no exp with home canning)
So the idea of packing a pint jar in your lunch box is definitely a no-go.
Still great idea for cooking at home.
View Quote

completely wrong

if you have canned it correctly and the can is under vacuum it is safe at room temp

buy an American
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 5:18:22 PM EST
Two questions: can you can in a regular pressure cooker?

And:

Anyone have a good recipe for canned beef stew?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 5:46:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2016 5:47:14 PM EST by spidey07]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
Two questions: can you can in a regular pressure cooker?

And:

Anyone have a good recipe for canned beef stew?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
View Quote


Pretty sure you can. We have one for cooking and another for canning. The only reason for the two is one is easy to cook with and get going and the other All American is for production/capacity. As far as recipes we stick to the Ball canning book, always pleased. Have not tried meat yet.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:01:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
Two questions: can you can in a regular pressure cooker?

And:

Anyone have a good recipe for canned beef stew?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
View Quote

I wouldn't the temps change too quick.


A regular canner will do fine. You don't *need* an all American.

I have both. Also, 2 smaller ones is a lot easier to work with than one super huge one.

By small I mean one that holds 7 quarts.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:06:07 PM EST
I find it easier to just can meat and make stew with that. Otherwise things get too mushy.


Canned whole chicken (cut in pieces) with the bone in makes super delicious soup and stuff. The broth is crazy rich and tasty.

You can also save your turkey carcus and boil it and make stock.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:11:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By spidey07:


Pretty sure you can. We have one for cooking and another for canning. The only reason for the two is one is easy to cook with and get going and the other All American is for production/capacity. As far as recipes we stick to the Ball canning book, always pleased. Have not tried meat yet.
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Originally Posted By spidey07:
Originally Posted By dog-meat:
Two questions: can you can in a regular pressure cooker?

And:

Anyone have a good recipe for canned beef stew?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Pretty sure you can. We have one for cooking and another for canning. The only reason for the two is one is easy to cook with and get going and the other All American is for production/capacity. As far as recipes we stick to the Ball canning book, always pleased. Have not tried meat yet.


Meat is the easiest thing in the world to can. You just stuff it in the her.


The rest is just time. It has to vent, then come to pressure, then maintain the pressure, then depressureize.

If it depressureizes too fast and you yank the lid off the supper heated jars will get the liquid siphoned out.


But other than taking the time and following proper procedure it's easy. I don't bother with browning, the times are the same.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:11:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gitarmac:
I find it easier to just can meat and make stew with that. Otherwise things get too mushy.



Canned whole chicken (cut in pieces) with the bone in makes super delicious soup and stuff. The broth is crazy rich and tasty.


You can also save your turkey carcus and boil it and make stock.
View Quote


I know I'm getting off topic but for turkey/chicken stock we make a mess of it and freeze it in tupperware quart containers. Yes canning would be better/longer shelf life but this is quick and easy and you always wind up using it.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:29:17 PM EST
Bought my wife an American 921 about 6 months ago and she loves it.
It has both pressure and weighted gauges.

Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:31:34 PM EST
My wife has canned for 40 years without a pressure cooker. She cold packs.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:32:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By gaweidert:
My wife has canned for 40 years without a pressure cooker. She cold packs.
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hope she isn't canning meat or non-acidic food.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 6:44:58 PM EST
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Originally Posted By dog-meat:



hope she isn't canning meat or non-acidic food.
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Originally Posted By dog-meat:
Originally Posted By gaweidert:
My wife has canned for 40 years without a pressure cooker. She cold packs.



hope she isn't canning meat or non-acidic food.


Yep. Pressure cooker is required for canning veggies and meats. Botulism is a real thing and the only that destoys the spores is the temps and time via pressure cooker.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 7:53:54 PM EST
Just an FYI - if anyone is looking to buy a pressure cooker and wants one of the All American models, jet.com has them with 15% off for the first 3 orders on new shoppers. Can get the 921 for about $170.
Link Posted: 11/20/2016 8:35:34 PM EST
The 921 is the best model I think. I have that one. You can double stack pints.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 7:40:21 PM EST
Welp, spouse got a nice nannerhead. Canning some meat tonight. I have 7 quarts in each canner.

They both hold 7 quarts but the 921 will double stack pints.

I don't see the practicality of double quarts.

Unless I have more than 7 quarts I use my old national #7 that I retrofitted with all American parts (vent tube and jiggler) and got a couple of gaskets.

It has less volume and mass, it comes to pressure a little faster than the all American and is easier to handle.

3 of the quarts are trimmings for my beagles. I can scraps for them and put it on their food.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 7:43:12 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Whatever you get, make sure you get the latest Ball Canning guide to go with it.

If you follow the directions to the letter then your finished product will be safe and stable.
View Quote



Yep. Get the guide first before you go buying all the wrong stuff.


Oh, and a pressure cooker is great for cooking up dried beans fast for your chili.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 7:51:41 PM EST
All American 921, if you can less get the 915 but I recommend the 921 for future growth. Amazon has the 921 for $201.

We started with a 915 and our garden grew. As it did the bigger canner was a savings.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:02:45 PM EST
The #1 thing I can is tomatoes. I usually have 3 or 4 dozen plants, and when they start coming in, I have a load. Spaghetti sauce and different kinds of salsas are mostly it. For tomatoes, because they have high acidity, you don't need a pressure cooker ~ just a water bath canner.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:19:27 PM EST
Do it. Canned tuna and other foods are excellent tasting and far surpass any thing store bought.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:23:15 PM EST
I really need to get a bigger canner with a gauge and do more of it.

I get lazy, so I cheat. I pack everything, let it cool a bit, then toss them all in the deep freeze. Excellent way to keep raw tomatoes for sauce later, or finished sauce, or marinated chunks of meat for thawing and grilling.

Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:30:40 PM EST
Can you “Pressure Can” in a Pressure Cooker?

I think the proper question is: SHOULD you pressure can in a pressure cooker?

The answer is NO.

A pressure cooker is not as sophisticated as a canner. (That is why it is cheaper.)

First, it is not built for monitoring pressure/temperature as accurately which is SO important in canning safety. So while it might be able to take small jars of food up to a pressure, you really can’t know for sure what that pressure is.

Second, it is not made to maintain a specific pressure with razor-sharp accuracy. If the proper pressure is not met and maintained, then the proper temperature is not met and maintained.

In other words, you may not destroy the harmful bacteria that cause botulism.

The National Center for Home Food Preservation advises against using a pressure cooker for canning. There are just too many different makes, models and brands and most are not as accurate as the manufacturer may claim.

So the bottom line is that a pressure cooker is just built for cooking – not canning.
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Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:43:54 PM EST
Do it.....buy once, cry once..... All American. All the way.
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 8:57:09 PM EST
Has anyone here canned hot peppers from their garden?

Imagine canning ghost peppers!
Link Posted: 11/27/2016 9:23:45 PM EST
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Originally Posted By zoom6zoom:
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Originally Posted By zoom6zoom:
Can you “Pressure Can” in a Pressure Cooker?

I think the proper question is: SHOULD you pressure can in a pressure cooker?

The answer is NO.

A pressure cooker is not as sophisticated as a canner. (That is why it is cheaper.)

First, it is not built for monitoring pressure/temperature as accurately which is SO important in canning safety. So while it might be able to take small jars of food up to a pressure, you really can’t know for sure what that pressure is.

Second, it is not made to maintain a specific pressure with razor-sharp accuracy. If the proper pressure is not met and maintained, then the proper temperature is not met and maintained.

In other words, you may not destroy the harmful bacteria that cause botulism.

The National Center for Home Food Preservation advises against using a pressure cooker for canning. There are just too many different makes, models and brands and most are not as accurate as the manufacturer may claim.

So the bottom line is that a pressure cooker is just built for cooking – not canning.


Yes, there are low cost pressure cookers that look as if they are better suited to cooking meals than canning (no pressure gauge).

Just buy a unit sold as a pressure canner and you will be fine...the $79 Presto units are sold as such.
They work just fine...

However, I have my sites set on an All American.
They are made in Wisconsin, and do not require a gasket (which the lower cost Presto unit does...and it wears out from what I understand).


Link Posted: 12/1/2016 1:12:22 PM EST
Attachment Attached File


When I refurbished my old national #7, which was made by presto centuries ago, I was able to get a shiney new gasket. I got a couple, still on the first one and it's been over 5 years.

Here is a pic of my 2 canners in action this past weekend. I like them both. The important thing to me is that it has a jiggler, not anything about gaskets. Notice how mine have both.

You don't have to spend a bunch of money on an all American if you are on a budget, a presto works fine. They make a "conversion" part if you get the one without the jiggler. 
Link Posted: 12/1/2016 1:14:12 PM EST
They both hold 7 quarts, the big one will double stack pints.

I rarely can pints so if I have 7 or less I grab the smaller one.
Link Posted: 12/7/2016 8:05:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RamblinWreck:
I have the big Presto with dial.

I can some deer meat every year. Very convenient for whipping up some quick stew or chili, since its already cooked and tender.
View Quote



Bumping this thread to mention the 3 part jiggler (regulator) you can get for the newer model presta.

Apparently the one that comes with it releases at 15lbs, and a lot of folks need 10lbs.

The 3 part one can be configured for 5, 10, and 15lbs. I don't know why presta just doesn't ship them with the better part.

You can get the presta canner, new regulator, and extra tray (so you can double stack pints) for under 100 bucks from Amazon.

This part is important because it lets you walk away and listen to your clattering canner gently jiggling in the kitchen, confident it's at the proper pressure and staying at the proper pressure.

The presta can be used on glass stoves apparently. Something to do with flat bottom, I have gas so I have no experience with that.

Even though I have 2 canners and 1 smaller cooker I fight the urge to get that one. 

Tomorrow I'm going to can a couple of whole chickens. The couple I did last time were the best chicken and stock I've ever had.

I've got bunches of empty jars from a big venison season a couple years ago that need filling. This thread has inspired me. 


Here is a pic of my pantry room a few years ago. It's so nice to open a jar of delicious meat, already cooked and tender. 

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 12/7/2016 8:17:32 PM EST
I use a Presto 23-Quart that was my father in laws.

It works great with only having to replace the lid seal due to dry rot.
Link Posted: 12/7/2016 9:05:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/7/2016 11:40:09 PM EST by Threefingers]
Good bump...I read the canning guide (its mostly recipes) over the weekend and ordered a presto, this doesn't look difficult at all.
Link Posted: 12/8/2016 5:07:39 PM EST
Make sure and get that 3 part regulator. I don't know why they just don't come with that part. 

Otherwise, depending on the altitude you live at, you'll have to keep checking the gauge to confirm its at 10lbs, not below 10lbs, but not 15lbs. Not that it would be dangerous at 15lbs, some things might overcook though.
Link Posted: 12/8/2016 5:19:27 PM EST
I use a Presto 23 quart, and it works fine.
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