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Posted: 12/5/2014 4:26:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/5/2014 4:29:12 PM EST by primuspilum]
For my contribution, I give you First Spear Centurion and Evocatus; Gaius Crastinus.


Won every distinction for valor the Romans had except for the "grass crown." Mentioned in dispatches by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar and the only Roman soldier in Roman history to have been awarded decorations for valor posthumously, which was done by Caesar himself.


Crastinus was a First Spear Centurion of the Xth Roman Legion who distinguished himself again and again until his death in 48 BC at the Battle of Pharsalus where he sacrificed himself so that Caesar could achieve victory prompting Caesar himself to remark that he owed the fallen Centurion a debt. He was also present at the surrender of Vercingetorix at the Battle of Alesia. Caesar considered him one of the finest soldiers in his Legions.


http://www.firstlegionltd.com/rom001imperialromanlegionnairewithgladius-1.aspx

Gaius Crastinus joined the 10th Legion after service in the 8th or 9th Legion in Spain under Pompey the Great. Personally selected by Caesar, he transferred over as a Junior Centurion to the 10th Legion when it was being formed. Serving Caesar in his many campaigns in Gaul, Crastinus eventually became the Chief Centurion before his retirement.
Recalled to duty by Caesar during the Civil War with Pompey, Crastinus lost his life at the Battle of Pharsalus. In one of the very rare instances when the Roman Army bestowed a posthumous award for bravery, Chief Centurion Gaius Crastinus was so recognized by Caesar at the time of his burial after the Battle of Phasalus in 48 BC.




No pics, here's representation of a 10th Legion Centurion of the period.


Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:28:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:32:33 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:35:58 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RustedAce:



http://i.imgur.com/BQOBBnw.jpg
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Originally Posted By RustedAce:
Originally Posted By primuspilum:

Won every distinction for valor the Romans had except for the "grass crown." Mentioned in dispatches by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar



http://i.imgur.com/BQOBBnw.jpg



Got to use a gun.


2 MOH's? Meh. They were practically giving those things away back then anyway.







Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:37:18 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/5/2014 4:38:53 PM EST by RustedAce]
Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:38:58 PM EST
anyone in a Gary Linderer or Larry CHambers book?
Link Posted: 12/5/2014 4:49:20 PM EST
Mike Colalillo.



http://attic.areavoices.com/2011/12/30/mike-colalillo-medal-of-honor-recipient-from-duluth/



RIP, Mr. C. It was a great honor to meet you.
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 1:47:34 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:04:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/7/2014 2:04:57 AM EST by troutbum86]



Jean Thurel (or Jean Theurel; 6 September 1698 – 10 March 1807) was a fusilier of the French Army with an extraordinarily long career that spanned over 90 years of service in the Touraine Regiment. Born in the reign of Louis XIV and dying during that of Napoleon I, Thurel lived in three different centuries and served three different monarchs.

...

Thurel was severely wounded in battle on two occasions. In 1733, during the siege of Kehl, he was shot in the chest with a musket, and at the battle of Minden in 1759, he received seven sword slashes, including six to the head.

...

A well-disciplined soldier of the line infantry, Thurel was only admonished once during his entire career, during the 1747 Siege of Bergen as the French troops occupied the citadel. He was admonished because, the doors of the fortress being shut, he scaled its walls to gain entry so that he would not miss muster. Another example of Thurel's discipline and physical fitness occurred in 1787. When his regiment was ordered to march to the coast to embark on ships of the French Navy, he was given the opportunity to travel in a carriage due to his advanced age. The 88-year-old Thurel refused the offer and marched the entire distance on foot, stating that he had never before traveled by carriage and had no intention of doing so at that time. His humility is evident in his steadfast refusal to accept any promotions; he remained a low-ranking fusilier for his entire military career.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Thurel
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:13:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:34:05 AM EST
That Finnish sniper, I can't remember his name. The guy was a killing machine.
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:37:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/7/2014 2:55:13 AM EST by RogueSpear2023]
Chesty Puller

5 Navy Crosses
1 Army Distinguished Service medal
Silver Star
2 Legion meirt badges 1 with combat
Bronze star with combat
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:39:15 AM EST
Rick Rescorla

or Robert Cain

Cain's citation for his Victoria Cross

War Office, 2nd November, 1944.

The KING has been graciously pleased to approve awards of the VICTORIA CROSS to: —

Captain (temporary Major) Robert Henry Cain (129484), The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, (attd. The South Staffordshire Regiment) (I Airborne Division) (Salcombe, Devon).

In Holland on 19th September, 1944, Major Cain was commanding a rifle company of the South Staffordshire Regiment during the Battle of Arnhem when his company was cut off from the rest of the battalion and during the next six days was closely engaged with enemy tanks, self-propelled guns and infantry. The Germans made repeated attempts to break into the company position by infiltration and had they succeeded in doing so the whole situation of the Airborne Troops would have been jeopardised.

Major Cain, by his outstanding devotion to duty and remarkable powers of leadership, was to a large extent personally responsible for saving a vital sector from falling into the hands of the enemy.

On 20th September a Tiger tank approached the area held by his company and Major Cain went out alone to deal with it armed with a Piat. Taking up a position he held his fire until the tank was only 20 yards away when he opened up. The tank immediately halted and turned its guns on him, shooting away a corner of the house near where this officer was lying. Although wounded by machine gun bullets and falling masonry, Major Cain continued firing until he had scored several direct hits, immobilised the tank and supervised the bringing up of a 75 mm. howitzer which completely destroyed it. Only then would he consent to have his wounds dressed.

In the next morning this officer drove off three more tanks by the fearless use of his Piat, on each occasion leaving cover and taking up position in open ground with complete disregard for his personal safety.

During the following days, Major Cain was everywhere where danger threatened, moving amongst his men and encouraging them by his fearless example to hold out. He refused rest and medical attention in spite of the fact that his hearing had been seriously impaired because of a perforated eardrum and he was suffering from multiple wounds.

On 25 September the enemy made a concerted attack on Major Cain's position, using self-propelled guns, flame throwers and infantry. By this time the last Piat had been put out of action and Major Cain was armed with only a light 2" mortar. However, by a skilful use of this weapon and his daring leadership of the few men still under his command, he completely demoralized the enemy who, after an engagement lasting more than three hours, withdrew in disorder.

Throughout the whole course of the Battle of Arnhem, Major Cain showed superb gallantry. His powers of endurance and leadership were the admiration of all his fellow officers and stories of his valour were being constantly exchanged amongst the troops. His coolness and courage under incessant fire could not be surpassed
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:46:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/7/2014 2:48:39 AM EST by B44T]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
That Finnish sniper, I can't remember his name. The guy was a killing machine.
View Quote


Simo Häyhä.

bad ass of the week

http://www.simohayha.com/

Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:49:31 AM EST
Rick Rescola
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 2:55:20 AM EST
Assuming OP read the book on the 10th legion?
I forget his name or if he even had one but the aquilifer or standard bearer during Caesar's invasion of Britian.
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:00:56 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:02:59 AM EST
Jose Mendoza Lopez - Medal of Honor

Wiki
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:07:42 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TZ250:
Roy Benevidez
View Quote


Yep.

Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:24:06 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:25:31 AM EST
I thought this thread was about this guy. He needed a Chinook to get his huge balls onto the battle field.



Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:26:54 AM EST
Lauri Torni (AKA Larry Thorne). At least two threads in the archive on him alone.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:29:01 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
That Finnish sniper, I can't remember his name. The guy was a killing machine.
View Quote

Simo Häyhä.

And another butt kicker is in my avatar, Lauri Törni.

MN
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:38:13 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DoubleARon:
I thought this thread was about this guy. He needed a Chinook to get his huge balls onto the battle field.

http://www.rlhtribute.com/images/bob_howard_color.jpg

View Quote



This is the man I was going to mention. Unbelievable record and decorations. IIRC he is (was, RIP) the most decorated serviceman in US history. Col. Robert L. Howard.

Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:41:46 AM EST
Simo Hayha, and Roy Benevidez have been mentioned.

Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:46:43 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:48:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 3:51:47 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 4:03:25 AM EST
CSM Basil L. Plumley



Link Posted: 12/7/2014 4:43:29 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 4:51:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/7/2014 4:54:25 AM EST by djburnett]
How about that one german Roman soldier who ran next to a generals horse for hours and begged to be allowed into the army then wrestled the strongest 10 soldiers back to back to show how strong he was. Later he became the General of the army then he became a the actual fucking Emperor of Rom for a short time.


Maximinius?
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 4:59:26 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By troutbum86:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/Jean_Thurel_1788_%281804%29%2C_par_Antoine_Vestier.jpg/330px-Jean_Thurel_1788_%281804%29%2C_par_Antoine_Vestier.jpg


Jean Thurel (or Jean Theurel; 6 September 1698 – 10 March 1807) was a fusilier of the French Army with an extraordinarily long career that spanned over 90 years of service in the Touraine Regiment. Born in the reign of Louis XIV and dying during that of Napoleon I, Thurel lived in three different centuries and served three different monarchs.

...

Thurel was severely wounded in battle on two occasions. In 1733, during the siege of Kehl, he was shot in the chest with a musket, and at the battle of Minden in 1759, he received seven sword slashes, including six to the head.

...

A well-disciplined soldier of the line infantry, Thurel was only admonished once during his entire career, during the 1747 Siege of Bergen as the French troops occupied the citadel. He was admonished because, the doors of the fortress being shut, he scaled its walls to gain entry so that he would not miss muster. Another example of Thurel's discipline and physical fitness occurred in 1787. When his regiment was ordered to march to the coast to embark on ships of the French Navy, he was given the opportunity to travel in a carriage due to his advanced age. The 88-year-old Thurel refused the offer and marched the entire distance on foot, stating that he had never before traveled by carriage and had no intention of doing so at that time. His humility is evident in his steadfast refusal to accept any promotions; he remained a low-ranking fusilier for his entire military career.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Thurel
No matter how tough you think you may be there is always a tougher SOB somewhere. What an animal.
Link Posted: 12/7/2014 5:02:57 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hwj_chim:
Rick Rescorla

or Robert Cain

Cain's citation for his Victoria Cross

War Office, 2nd November, 1944.

The KING has been graciously pleased to approve awards of the VICTORIA CROSS to: —

Captain (temporary Major) Robert Henry Cain (129484), The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, (attd. The South Staffordshire Regiment) (I Airborne Division) (Salcombe, Devon).

In Holland on 19th September, 1944, Major Cain was commanding a rifle company of the South Staffordshire Regiment during the Battle of Arnhem when his company was cut off from the rest of the battalion and during the next six days was closely engaged with enemy tanks, self-propelled guns and infantry. The Germans made repeated attempts to break into the company position by infiltration and had they succeeded in doing so the whole situation of the Airborne Troops would have been jeopardised.

Major Cain, by his outstanding devotion to duty and remarkable powers of leadership, was to a large extent personally responsible for saving a vital sector from falling into the hands of the enemy.

On 20th September a Tiger tank approached the area held by his company and Major Cain went out alone to deal with it armed with a Piat. Taking up a position he held his fire until the tank was only 20 yards away when he opened up. The tank immediately halted and turned its guns on him, shooting away a corner of the house near where this officer was lying. Although wounded by machine gun bullets and falling masonry, Major Cain continued firing until he had scored several direct hits, immobilised the tank and supervised the bringing up of a 75 mm. howitzer which completely destroyed it. Only then would he consent to have his wounds dressed.

In the next morning this officer drove off three more tanks by the fearless use of his Piat, on each occasion leaving cover and taking up position in open ground with complete disregard for his personal safety.

During the following days, Major Cain was everywhere where danger threatened, moving amongst his men and encouraging them by his fearless example to hold out. He refused rest and medical attention in spite of the fact that his hearing had been seriously impaired because of a perforated eardrum and he was suffering from multiple wounds.

On 25 September the enemy made a concerted attack on Major Cain's position, using self-propelled guns, flame throwers and infantry. By this time the last Piat had been put out of action and Major Cain was armed with only a light 2" mortar. However, by a skilful use of this weapon and his daring leadership of the few men still under his command, he completely demoralized the enemy who, after an engagement lasting more than three hours, withdrew in disorder.

Throughout the whole course of the Battle of Arnhem, Major Cain showed superb gallantry. His powers of endurance and leadership were the admiration of all his fellow officers and stories of his valour were being constantly exchanged amongst the troops. His coolness and courage under incessant fire could not be surpassed
View Quote
I have watched Jeremy's presentation at least two dozen times.

Link Posted: 1/4/2015 11:24:06 AM EST
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
For my contribution, I give you First Spear Centurion and Evocatus; Gaius Crastinus.


Won every distinction for valor the Romans had except for the "grass crown." Mentioned in dispatches by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar and the only Roman soldier in Roman history to have been awarded decorations for valor posthumously, which was done by Caesar himself.


Crastinus was a First Spear Centurion of the Xth Roman Legion who distinguished himself again and again until his death in 48 BC at the Battle of Pharsalus where he sacrificed himself so that Caesar could achieve victory prompting Caesar himself to remark that he owed the fallen Centurion a debt. He was also present at the surrender of Vercingetorix at the Battle of Alesia. Caesar considered him one of the finest soldiers in his Legions.


http://www.firstlegionltd.com/rom001imperialromanlegionnairewithgladius-1.aspx

Gaius Crastinus joined the 10th Legion after service in the 8th or 9th Legion in Spain under Pompey the Great. Personally selected by Caesar, he transferred over as a Junior Centurion to the 10th Legion when it was being formed. Serving Caesar in his many campaigns in Gaul, Crastinus eventually became the Chief Centurion before his retirement.
Recalled to duty by Caesar during the Civil War with Pompey, Crastinus lost his life at the Battle of Pharsalus. In one of the very rare instances when the Roman Army bestowed a posthumous award for bravery, Chief Centurion Gaius Crastinus was so recognized by Caesar at the time of his burial after the Battle of Phasalus in 48 BC.




No pics, here's representation of a 10th Legion Centurion of the period.


http://m.c.lnkd.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/p/1/005/06e/312/2fac949.jpg
View Quote



He gets my vote. Legio X vs Legio I and he played the ultimate card that you can only play once.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 11:54:07 AM EST


Remy Schrijnen,manned a 7.5cm AT gun single handed and destroyed 11 Soviet tanks.





Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:06:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/4/2015 12:18:21 PM EST by MSC]
Farmer Jack Hinson.

When Union troops caught his two sons with their hunting rifles, they were killed as suspected bushwackers. Then their decapitated heads were put on Hinson gate posts.

After having a custom sniper rifle made, Hinson first killed the Lieutenant of the soldiers that killed his sons. The second man he killed was the Sergeant who put his sons heads on the gate posts.

So he took to the high ground, over looking the rivers.

Hinson would shoot officers and ship captains. Nailed close to 100 Union men. Even had a armed Navy gunboat full of soldiers surrender to him. They thought he was a large group of Rebels.

Nearly 100 sniper kills ain't bad with a single shot muzzleloader.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:18:15 PM EST
Originally Posted By primuspilum:
For my contribution, I give you First Spear Centurion and Evocatus; Gaius Crastinus.


Won every distinction for valor the Romans had except for the "grass crown." Mentioned in dispatches by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar and the only Roman soldier in Roman history to have been awarded decorations for valor posthumously, which was done by Caesar himself.


Crastinus was a First Spear Centurion of the Xth Roman Legion who distinguished himself again and again until his death in 48 BC at the Battle of Pharsalus where he sacrificed himself so that Caesar could achieve victory prompting Caesar himself to remark that he owed the fallen Centurion a debt. He was also present at the surrender of Vercingetorix at the Battle of Alesia. Caesar considered him one of the finest soldiers in his Legions.


http://www.firstlegionltd.com/rom001imperialromanlegionnairewithgladius-1.aspx

Gaius Crastinus joined the 10th Legion after service in the 8th or 9th Legion in Spain under Pompey the Great. Personally selected by Caesar, he transferred over as a Junior Centurion to the 10th Legion when it was being formed. Serving Caesar in his many campaigns in Gaul, Crastinus eventually became the Chief Centurion before his retirement.
Recalled to duty by Caesar during the Civil War with Pompey, Crastinus lost his life at the Battle of Pharsalus. In one of the very rare instances when the Roman Army bestowed a posthumous award for bravery, Chief Centurion Gaius Crastinus was so recognized by Caesar at the time of his burial after the Battle of Phasalus in 48 BC.




No pics, here's representation of a 10th Legion Centurion of the period.


http://m.c.lnkd.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/p/1/005/06e/312/2fac949.jpg
View Quote



Primus, dude. Are you a history professor? How do keep all that stuff in your head without it falling out of your ears?
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:20:40 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TZ250:
Roy Benevidez
View Quote



+100. I did a paper on this guy in school.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:22:57 PM EST
Kurt Knispel- may not be a foot soldier, but best tank ace of ww2. 168 confirmed tank kills, served on three different tanks including the panzeriv, Tiger, and King Tiger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Knispel
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:25:12 PM EST
No, I have to agree with Rick Rescorla. What he did while in the 1st CAV was impressive enough, but his actions on 9/11 were the definition of above and beyond.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:26:39 PM EST
On April 19, 1775, British forces were returning to Boston from the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the opening engagements of the war. On their march, they were continually shot at by colonial militiamen.

Whittemore was in his fields when he spotted an approaching British relief brigade under Earl Percy, sent to assist the retreat. Whittemore loaded his musket and ambushed the British Grenadiers of the 47th Regiment of Foot from behind a nearby stone wall, killing one soldier. He then drew his dueling pistols and killed a grenadier and mortally wounded a second. By the time Whittemore had fired his third shot, a British detachment reached his position; Whittemore drew his sword and attacked. He was shot in the face, bayoneted numerous times, and left for dead in a pool of blood. He was found by colonial forces, alive, trying to load his musket to fight again. He was taken to Dr. Cotton Tufts of Medford, who perceived no hope for his survival. However, Whittemore lived another 18 years until dying of natural causes at the age of 96.
View Quote



Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:28:36 PM EST
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Originally Posted By kpel308:
Since apparently we are including officers, let us not forget our own Capt Brian Chontosh, USMC, AKA Diesel _06.

I still believe his actions rated The Medal.
View Quote

I've read up on him before. He is a fucking stud for sure.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:28:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mac_Fan:
Lauri Torni (AKA Larry Thorne). At least two threads in the archive on him alone.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
View Quote


He is my spirit guide.

Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:28:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/4/2015 12:32:32 PM EST by MadMax1911]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MSC:
Farmer Jack Hinson.

When Union troops caught his two sons with their hunting rifles, they were killed as suspected bushwackers. Then their decapitated heads were put on Hinson gate posts.

After having a custom sniper rifle made, Hinson first killed the Lieutenant of the soldiers that killed his sons. The second man he killed was the Sergeant who put his sons heads on the gate posts.

So he took to the high ground, over looking the rivers.

Hinson would shoot officers and ship captains. Nailed close to 100 Union men. Even had a armed Navy gunboat full of soldiers surrender to him. They thought he was a large group of Rebels.

Nearly 100 sniper kills ain't bad with a single shot muzzleloader.
View Quote





dammit. Oh well bye. Off to google
ETA: My submissions are Lyudmila Pavlichenko Mad Dog Shriver, Chris Haney, Charlie Beckwith, Carlos Hathcock.

Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:29:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
That Finnish sniper, I can't remember his name. The guy was a killing machine.
View Quote


Larry Thorne?

Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:35:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kpel308:
GySgt Carlos Hathcock. Other snipers have exceeded his exploits, but he developed methodology that is still taught today. He literally wrote the book on sniping.
View Quote


I was going to say Hathcock. He (IMO) didnt get the honors he was due.





His wounds from the APC accident never fully healed and on top of that he had MS or Parkinsons. He had 93 confirmed kills and over 300 non confirmed kills.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:37:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/4/2015 12:48:39 PM EST by Aussie_E]
Billy Sing

150 confirmed kills. Another 150+/- unconfirmed.
Survived a gas attack and being wounded multiple times including being shot in the back.
Went on to die poor and forgotten back in Australia.
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:39:38 PM EST
Bennie Adkins

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennie_G._Adkins
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:44:18 PM EST
If Officers are GTG, I submit Israel Putnam.

Reading detailed reports about his actions at Breed's Hill and in other battles is legendary.

He truly was the baddest ass Mo Fo of the Am Rev, IMHO.

Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:44:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/4/2015 12:46:08 PM EST by ATLDiver]
Lt. Commander Evans and all of the Johnston crew
Link Posted: 1/4/2015 12:49:31 PM EST
No love for Audie Murphy?
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