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Posted: 8/3/2011 7:40:12 AM EDT
If you were to open a retail storefront what would you:

Have in Inventory for Firearms:

Merchandise Stock:

Layout Suggestions:

Services:

Please no resposnes as to customer service etc. We are all aware of the "RETARDS" out there manning some of the counters.

Pictures of the suggest female help of course is welcome.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:45:00 AM EDT
[#1]
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:50:09 AM EDT
[#2]
I would stock the guns that Wal-Mart doesn't sell, like Taurus Judges, Glocks, basic AR's. I would also encourage consignment sales with only a 10% take. Good way to fill up the racks with out overextending. Also a good way to increase sales, if the guy has $500 in his hand from selling a gun, now is a good time to sell him something else.

And I know people here will laugh about the Judges, but my main FFL is a cop/military style shop and he still sells more Judges than anything else. Can't keep them in stock.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:50:18 AM EDT
[#3]
Just my orpinions, and I've never been in retail, but:

Inventory: The shops I like best are the ones that have very few guns on the rack, but can order just about anything you'd ever want. It keeps overhead low, and you can just about calculate what they're paying and what they're making off of you.


If I were opening a store front I would be focused on getting customers in the doors. Whether it's a matter of location, keeping a pot of coffee and welcoming folks to hang around, doing cleaning and/or appraisals on the cheap, starting up doing very cheap transfers, etc.  I would rather make 10x$10 transactions in a day than 1x$100 transaction. Find something you can offer to get people talking about your shop. Without knowing what area you're in, what kind of shop you envision, it's hard to offer many suggestions.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:51:10 AM EDT
[#4]
Q: How do you make a small fortune in the firearms business?



A: Start with a large fortune.


Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:53:36 AM EDT
[#5]
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:56:36 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Q: How do you make a small fortune in the firearms business?

A: Start with a large fortune.

What he said, I'd slap myself and not open a firearms storefront.    

I suppose it depends where you are. Stocking a store with stuff like Noveske, LaRue and Knights stuff would be fun, but almost no one around here buys ARs, much less expensive ones. Might be different in Texas.


+1.
Same shop sells some nice high end AR's and 1911's but it is all special order. Most 1911's in the racks are the $600-800.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:58:50 AM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do

This.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 7:59:18 AM EDT
[#8]
Been there, done that.  Worked 82 hours a week for 5 years, and ended up losing the business when deployed the first time.  Took 5 more years to pay off the business loan for a business that did not exist any more.

I disagree with the "don't stock much" advice- you want to have knowledgable employees who can talk intelligently and answer folks' questions, hopefully by actually showing them.  That is the ONE THING a small mom-and-pop gunstore can do better than any of the other options.  Your staff will make or break you in terms of your customer base.  Most of your customers can beat or at least match your prices elsewhere, so you have to offer something better than that.  

The money made on selling firearms, in the long run, will pay for your licenses and such.  But it won't pay your rent or yield profit.  In some years, sure it will- but those will average out with some lean times.  You can make good money on accessories and such, but firearms will mostly make you customers.  Then sell knives, ammo, holsters, any related stuff to actually make some money.  

Do transfers, and don't be a dick about it.  The guy who buys guns in transfers will see something he likes (see my first point) in your store and buy it from you later.  Or maybe his ammo, or optics, etc.  Think of doing transfers as growing the customer base and demand for your other products, not as stealing low-profit sales from you that you shouldn't much worry about anyway.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:00:08 AM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
Q: How do you make a small fortune in the firearms business?

A: Start with a large fortune.


I beg to differ. I've seen many gun stores open in my area in the last few years. Non of them have gone under yet.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:04:25 AM EDT
[#10]
Look around in your area and see what gun stores are selling. Hang out without taking too much of the employees time and counter space. LISTEN. The customers that come in looking for something the other store doesn't have will give you some idea of what might sell.
Glocks, XDs, Kimber, Springfield Armory, Bushmaster Sig...Known brand names that will sell. I know a few of the stores in my area run consignment deals with their suppliers...I've heard both good and bad about those setups.  One of my lottery pipe dreams is to open a NICE storefront with a range in my town. All the good ranges are at least 35 minutes away and they are doing VERY well
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:07:09 AM EDT
[#11]
indoor gun range would be great money but plan on going in for 1.5 mil
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:09:21 AM EDT
[#12]


I've been told one shop just a little off the beaten path around here does transfers for free. That sounds like a great way to get people into your shop that would otherwise have never heard of it or would not otherwise make the drive.



Might not have to do free, but keep it quite cheap –– maybe $10-15?

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:10:20 AM EDT
[#13]
Just close your eyes, and remember the last 20 people you met at a gun show including people walking around.



You want to deal with those guys every day, all day, for your business and well-being? That's a store front FFL.



I'd rather open up an Jimmy Johns on a college campus and look at young pussy all day...if working hard and not making a lot were my life's goal (it's not).
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:11:56 AM EDT
[#14]
I've been in the gun business and other retail also.  I'd open a booze store.  Lots of cheap booze.  Inventory costs money.  I love going into a well stocked gun store but........................................
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:14:28 AM EDT
[#15]
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:16:40 AM EDT
[#16]





Quoted:



if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do



Exactly this.



ETA: You could have tons of stock on display, keep spares, holsters, belts, accessories, do on-site smithing such as installation of sights, AR assembly, etc, and almost every member here would applaud you for it, come in and finger-fuck your merchandise, and then tell you how they can get it $20 cheaper from some guy in a warehouse doing a transfer for $15 through their pawnshop FFL.





 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:24:13 AM EDT
[#17]
I agree with the "if i had the money, i would do anything but" crowd.

BUT that being said, if you must, i would say smallish new inventory, emphasis on special order, keep used and consignment inventory. You will never be able to compete with big box stores on basic stock sporting arms, so stick to the stuff they neglect. Also embrace the internet.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:28:19 AM EDT
[#18]
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:40:02 AM EDT
[#19]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do

Exactly this.

ETA: You could have tons of stock on display, keep spares, holsters, belts, accessories, do on-site smithing such as installation of sights, AR assembly, etc, and almost every member here would applaud you for it, come in and finger-fuck your merchandise, and then tell you how they can get it $20 cheaper from some guy in a warehouse doing a transfer for $15 through their pawnshop FFL.
 


I tend to agree. People ask me all the time why I don't sell guns. Every time I consider it I run the numbers then go hang out in a local shop and watch the customers. Makes me swear it off for a few more years....

Without knowing the specifics of his location and situation, the only blanket advice I can give is I would never open a gun shop without being or having on my payroll a very talented and reputable gunsmith. That will bring people in and will make money.


That, or you can simply skip selling Taurus firearms, and reduce the gunsmith's workload by about 45%. ;)
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:50:59 AM EDT
[#20]
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:52:05 AM EDT
[#21]
Quoted:
If you were to open a retail storefront what would you:

Have in Inventory for Firearms: Top 50 selling guns in your area.  No bizarre shit that won't move.  Retail is about moving merchandise.  

Merchandise Stock:  Mags, ammo, targets, earpro/eyepro, cases.  Again, stuff that moves.  

Layout Suggestions:Clean and well lit.  

Services: Reasonably priced transfers.  Willingness to do custom orders.  Remember your competition is the internet.  A gunsmith on hand is nice, even if it's just limited to basic services.

Please no resposnes as to customer service etc. We are all aware of the "RETARDS" out there manning some of the counters.

Pictures of the suggest female help of course is welcome.



Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:54:07 AM EDT
[#22]
I would proofread my sign first....
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 8:59:47 AM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do


First post.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:04:15 AM EDT
[#24]
I only have input on the layout because I don't know what the other stores around you have in stock.





Have lots of space. Midwest Guns in Mishawaka, Indiana has a great layout. They have a shitload of space, so it might not be possible for every store, but they have lots of space to walk around, keep all the rifles and shotguns on the outer walls so that there are no racks in the middle to get in the way, and have a counter right in the center with their handguns. There's lots of room and it is easy to walk around and see everything they have. I hate places that are so crammed with stuff  that it is impossible to move around.

 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:06:12 AM EDT
[#25]
Be careful about having too much stock of product people can buy on the internet cheaper. But keep a stock of easily lost/broken AR parts. That will win you a few friends.

My shop also stocks AR building kits so people have something for their new lowers.

I would keep a decent stock of common ammo calibers so people are willing to pay for convienence.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:07:04 AM EDT
[#26]



Quoted:


Q: How do you make a small fortune in the firearms business?



A: Start with a large fortune.



Perfect.



 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:11:14 AM EDT
[#27]



Quoted:


If you were to open a retail storefront what would you:



Have in Inventory for Firearms:



Merchandise Stock:



Layout Suggestions:



Services:



Please no resposnes as to customer service etc. We are all aware of the "RETARDS" out there manning some of the counters.



Pictures of the suggest female help of course is welcome.





I would stock items and brands that big fudd-oriented stores and your average stuck-in-the-past gun stores wont carry. Magpul, Vltor, BCM, VTAC, LaRue, Daniel Defense, Gear Sector, etc.



Definitely do internet transfers for a decent price. $20 maybe? Search for prices that other dealers set in your area. In South Florida, I would say the average is $30, but some stores are being dicks and charging $50. Probably attempting to make customers buy from their stock instead of internet sales.



Another thing, don't carry a brand of firearms if you will be forced to sell it $200 above the usual price in order to make a profit. A store near me is trying to sell new Glocks for $750. I can take a ten minute drive to a well known local Glock LE distributor and get one for less than $500.



Offer gunsmithing services like repair, sight installation, barrel fitting, parts installation, etc. Some official armorer certifications would help, if they aren't too expensive. I know Glock and S&W provide armorer classes, but I think S&W is mil/LEO only.





 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:13:56 AM EDT
[#28]
You have to be able to turn the inventory over regularly. Probably something like 8 times a year per sku number in guns. If not, that product is wasting capital. It sure looks cool on the shelf, but doesnt make you money and everyone will finger bang it, risking scratches and damage.

Guns are a loss leader for the most part. Most shops are running about a 10-12% markup. For example, Glock is fixed cost for everyone. A Gen3 G19 is $440.00 and most people are selling it for $489-$499 range. Not a lot of money there, especially when you factor in shipping, labor to log it in, labor to sell it, labor to log it out and overhead. Overhead will be heating/cooling, office supplies, water, sewage, gas, electric, rent/mortgage, insurance, tangible property tax, etc. Use the guns to get people in the door and make your money selling ammo and accessories which usually command a 30-50% markup.

When you buy you need to be a part of a big buy group for accessories or you will get killed by the competition. A big group like Worldwide for example. At their show and through the year you can order many products at lower than what cost would be if you purchased through a big distributor like Lipseys, Acusport, Davidsons, RSR, Hicks, Sports South, CamFour, etc. For example, Blackhawk products are purchased at 50% off retail with 6% show special and 6%net 10. The same goes for Galco, many ATK products, Freedom Group, etc.

You have to try and get direct for as many manufacturers as you can and get the best pricing, usually distributor level. Many big manufacturers sell at tier levels with the biggest sellers getting the best price. An example would be Kimber. If you can buy at Master Dealer pricing, then you can actually make about 12% and sell the product at regular dealer price, or you could mark up 10% from dealer price and make a lot more money. The same goes for places like LWRC, AAC, etc.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:14:14 AM EDT
[#29]
Quoted:
I would stock the guns that Wal-Mart doesn't sell, like Taurus Judges, Glocks, basic AR's. I would also encourage consignment sales with only a 10% take. Good way to fill up the racks with out overextending. Also a good way to increase sales, if the guy has $500 in his hand from selling a gun, now is a good time to sell him something else.

And I know people here will laugh about the Judges, but my main FFL is a cop/military style shop and he still sells more Judges than anything else. Can't keep them in stock.


Judges and Hi Points are a big part of retail gun sales right now.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:18:39 AM EDT
[#30]
Quoted:
Not nearly enough info here.

To answer your question we need to know what the population is like, average income, location (any military bases nearby), what stores already exist in your area, what they stock, and a lot of other info.

I have helped several people get into the surplsu business, and you have to look at all this first, then mold your business to who your custoemrs will be. You can never mold your customers to what you want your business to be.


This post should be stamped onto the back of every business license in the US.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:21:07 AM EDT
[#31]
If it were me, I focus on keeping a good stock of quality accessories.  Optics, mounts, rings, holsters, magazines, ect.  Nine out of tem times I'm going to a gun store it is not to buy an actual gun.  The few local shops that have the other stuff I need get my buisness when I'm in the market for an new gun.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:24:48 AM EDT
[#32]
SKSs, AKs, basic ARs, .22 rifles, 12/20 ga shotguns, pistols, ammo, quality but not high-end camping gear, emergency gear (food, water storage, MOPP gear, emergency radios), morale patches (but that might be passe now). I'd pimp the shit out of MOLLE gear cuz I think it's the greatest invention since the wheel and should be the platform for just about every job out there from construction worker to EMT/Firefighter to teacher!

Here in northern VA, there just isn't a whole lot of this stuff and I think it would make a killing while the field is so sparsely populated!
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:25:50 AM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:
Just close your eyes, and remember the last 20 people you met at a gun show including people walking around.

You want to deal with those guys every day, all day, for your business and well-being? That's a store front FFL.

I'd rather open up an Jimmy Johns on a college campus and look at young pussy all day...if working hard and not making a lot were my life's goal (it's not).

Oh man, how about a gun store on campus!

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:30:37 AM EDT
[#34]
I'd stock the guns that sell the fastest.  It shouldn't take a rocket scientist to figure out which ones sell the best in your area.  If you're in an area with a lot of hunting then find out the most popular rifles, and stock 8-10.  Same with shotguns.  Stock the most popular ammo for them.  Stock a small range of accessories.  

If you're in an urban area I'd stock pocket revolvers, carry pistols, service autos and self defense shotguns.  I'd stock a few ARs and AKs but I'd keep it fairly light.  I'd stock a good range of holsters, accessories and self defense ammo to go with them and I wouldn't rape my customers on ammo prices.

I'd try to offer something Walmart can't.  Night sight and accessory installation, competent advice on holsters and carry if you're in an urban area, slings, clothing, etc, if you're in a hunting area.  I'd consider throwing in a basic training class with the purchase of a pistol, holster and ammo as an incentive to buy from me and not from Wallyworld.

Layout?  I'd want one wall for long guns where folks could reach them (I hate a store where I have to ask to see every rifle or shotgun I want to shoulder), glass cases for pistols with stools in front where regulars could sit and BS for a while.  Have a row of shelves between with inexpensive items, surplus gear, ammo, mags, etc, etc.  I'd also want a decent selection of used guns, some people, and I'm one of them, like buying used and saving some money.  I'd also stock a small range of reloading supplies if there wasn't a big box store like Sportsmans Warehouse nearby.  

I doubt I'd keep more than 50 guns in stock at any one time unless it was a really big store.  25 pistols, 15 rifles and 10 shotguns.  Maybe add a few 22 rifles for the kids and maybe a pink pistol or two for the ladies.  Unless you know your clientele already it will take some research and experimentation to get it right.

Most of all I'd try to make people feel welcome to come in and hang out for a while.  Some of my fondest memories as a kid was going to the local gun store with Dad and just hanging out for an hour.  And Dad would almost always buy something during one of these trips, reloading supplies, a box of ammo, maybe have a gun serviced or have him look at a gun Dad couldn't get working the way he wanted it to.  I'd get a drink from the coke machine and sit on one of the stools and listen.  That was some good times.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:32:06 AM EDT
[#35]



Quoted:



Quoted:

Just close your eyes, and remember the last 20 people you met at a gun show including people walking around.



You want to deal with those guys every day, all day, for your business and well-being? That's a store front FFL.



I'd rather open up an Jimmy Johns on a college campus and look at young pussy all day...if working hard and not making a lot were my life's goal (it's not).


Oh man, how about a gun store on campus!





Just combine the gun store with the Jimmy John's. It could not be equaled.



 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:33:33 AM EDT
[#36]


Cammo fleshlights should be a top seller.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:37:01 AM EDT
[#37]
Set up shop near a major military base that houses a lot of infantry and make sure you have a good seamstress and equipment to sew custom 1000 denier nylon.
Stock all the tacticool shit.  Oakleys, boots, gloves, tshirts and "off duty" wear, etc.

Use the FFL primarily to display your personal toys as decoration, plan on taking a few orders for handguns and such, and plan to make all your money on service and soft goods.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:37:47 AM EDT
[#38]
do not want, not enough of a demand in my area
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:41:44 AM EDT
[#39]
storefront retail is deader than julius ceasar

internet mail order is the future.

end of story.

if you wanted a leupold scope right now, where would you get it?

because I can find the lowest price in the USA in 15 minutes without leaving my chair and have it at my house in 2 days for the same price I'd pay in sales tax.

how could anyone compete with that?

the internet is the biggest thing since television was invented.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:44:24 AM EDT
[#40]
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:45:01 AM EDT
[#41]



Quoted:


storefront retail is deader than julius ceasar



internet mail order is the future.



end of story.



if you wanted a leupold scope right now, where would you get it?



because I can find the lowest price in the USA in 15 minutes without leaving my chair and have it at my house in 2 days for the same price I'd pay in sales tax.



how could anyone compete with that?



the internet is the biggest thing since television was invented.


I agree. I could also get that same scope without having to deal with Haywood Yabuzov at the gun counter or Harold McBumfuck the customer  telling everyone in the store about his days as an Army SEAL.



 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:47:13 AM EDT
[#42]

Carry Colt 1911s, and price them reasonably. They never last more that a week in the showcase around here, even when over priced.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 9:56:35 AM EDT
[#43]
I'm just talking out my ass here. I have zero experience with the firearm business.

Your staff will either make you or break you. You need a knowledgeable, unbiased staff. You can offer gentle guidance, but if they really want a judge sell them a judge. I offer repeat business to the shops with great staff and will go out of my way. But I will walk out the door if they shit on me.

Stock a little bit of everything, try to appeal to as many markets as you can without over exerting yourself. Stock more of stuff that sells well.

Offer good rates on transfers, $20-25 will keep people coming back.

Start a website, if you can't beat online sales, join them.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:05:49 AM EDT
[#44]
A shop called Herd Tactical opened up last year near here.

He seems to be doing well and growing his customer base, despite not selling traditional hunting weapons.

I think the main reason he does well is that he keeps up on trends and knows what people are looking for, like BCM, Spikes, DD, Magpul, Surefire, etc.

He also keeps his prices on gear pretty competitive to what you would find on the internet and will do cheap FFL transfers.

I haven't bought a gun there yet, but I do buy ammo and accessories. I also am confident to send people there, because I know he is knowledgeable and will give them a fair deal.

He also sponsored our HTF meet-n-shoot

He's got a good strategy so far, at least from a customer's viewpoint.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:08:35 AM EDT
[#45]
Quoted:

Quoted:
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do

Exactly this.

ETA: You could have tons of stock on display, keep spares, holsters, belts, accessories, do on-site smithing such as installation of sights, AR assembly, etc, and almost every member here would applaud you for it, come in and finger-fuck your merchandise, and then tell you how they can get it $20 cheaper from some guy in a warehouse doing a transfer for $15 through their pawnshop FFL.
 


this ^  hear this shit daily. In the last three years, not one single person that we've done a transfer for has bought anything from our shop. we've instituted a new rule and only do transfers for regular customers now. it's honestly not worth my time/patience for a $20 transfer for some cheap bastard. I'd much rather be getting repairs/custom work done than mess with these guys.  there have been a few people that got mad because we actually charged to do transfers, i try to explain to them that we don't pay for the FFL and storefront just to do them favors. just my way of thinking, but if you want to buy guns online and not pay for or get a cheap transfer, get your own fuckin FFL.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:12:50 AM EDT
[#46]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:
if I had enough $ to open a retail gun store, opening a retail gun store would be the last thing I would do

Exactly this.

ETA: You could have tons of stock on display, keep spares, holsters, belts, accessories, do on-site smithing such as installation of sights, AR assembly, etc, and almost every member here would applaud you for it, come in and finger-fuck your merchandise, and then tell you how they can get it $20 cheaper from some guy in a warehouse doing a transfer for $15 through their pawnshop FFL.
 


I tend to agree. People ask me all the time why I don't sell guns. Every time I consider it I run the numbers then go hang out in a local shop and watch the customers. Makes me swear it off for a few more years....

Without knowing the specifics of his location and situation, the only blanket advice I can give is I would never open a gun shop without being or having on my payroll a very talented and reputable gunsmith. That will bring people in and will make money.


That, or you can simply skip selling Taurus firearms, and reduce the gunsmith's workload by about 45%. ;)




You would be amazed at the number of folks that go to a gunsmith to have the guns cleaned....$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


cleaning charges......$35 for most pistols/revolvers/rifle/shotguns.....a few are $45 in our shop. we have two 6'x4' lockers full of just cleanings at this time. we can't keep up. rifle bedding/pillar bedding is another good money maker.

Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:21:13 AM EDT
[#47]



Quoted:




Exactly this.



ETA: You could have tons of stock on display, keep spares, holsters, belts, accessories, do on-site smithing such as installation of sights, AR assembly, etc, and almost every member here would applaud you for it, come in and finger-fuck your merchandise, and then tell you how they can get it $20 cheaper from some guy in a warehouse doing a transfer for $15 through their pawnshop FFL.

 


I find this comment funny, since it kind of describes me.  There is a gun store close to where I live.  Huge store, plus indoor shooting range.  I wanted to buy a gun recently, so I went there.  Rented a Glock 26, bought some ammo (required to buy theirs when renting their gun), shot it and liked it.  Turned the gun in, and drove about 10 miles to another gun store to buy it.  



In my eyes, the larger gun store is just a showcase.  Look, but don't buy.  Now in my defense, their employees are complete assholes, and won't give you the time of the day.  I would much rather go to my favorite gun store and I'll let him order it (even If I don't save money, I'll give the smaller guy my business.)



 
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:21:33 AM EDT
[#48]
It really doesn't matter what you stock. Whatever it is, it will be ALMOST, but NOT QUITE what the guy standing in front of you is looking for . . .

Oh, and for all those that recommend stocking the things that the big stores don't stock: There's a reason they stock what they do and don't stock what they don't.
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:23:23 AM EDT
[#49]
In the last three years, not one single person that we've done a transfer for has bought anything from our shop.


Wow, that is quite the opposite experience I had.  I've been out of the business since 2003 though, so things may have changed.

Oh, and for all those that recommend stocking the things that the big stores don't stock: There's a reason they stock what they do and don't stock what they don't.


Because their staff doesn't know about about them to sell them?  j/k, but in truth a good staff makes most of the other concerns here moot
Link Posted: 8/3/2011 10:29:46 AM EDT
[#50]
Quoted:

If I were opening a store front I would be focused on getting customers in the doors. Whether it's a matter of location, keeping a pot of coffee and welcoming folks to hang around, .


Have you ever worked in retail?

You do not want to keep folks hanging around in a gunshop.  They have the capacity to waste time like nothing else.

 Except cops.

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