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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 1/3/2007 10:05:39 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:08:06 AM EST
That they have been in the private sector for at least 4 years. (It effectively gives us term limits too.)
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:08:25 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:09:23 AM EST
Must be a gun owner and would fight FOR citizens rights to own SBRs, suppressors and full auto.

Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:11:27 AM EST
They would be bound by Federal law to never take money from ANYONE PERIOD. Just their base salary.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:11:34 AM EST
Bench press 200 lbs
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:12:00 AM EST
I'd suggest that when considering making new laws, they fully examine previous applicable laws, ensure they are being enforced, and only then, in special cases (like when the Internet came around, there were some laws required for that, that the Founding Fathers hadn't forseen ), they can make new laws.

Contrary to Kofi Annan's idiotic assertion from late last year, man can indeed suffer from too many laws.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:12:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Bench press 200 lbs


You just eliminated 95% of Arfcom

That's not necessarily a bad thing...
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:13:06 AM EST
Their stickers must be 100% recycled and CFC-free, and in colors that do not clash with my Beetle.

Also, androgynous.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:17:48 AM EST
I'd change some things around. There is no pay for serving your country; you are provided housing in Washington and your meals and such are seen to. The housing is neither extravagent or craptacular. You are not provided with personal security forces. If you want someone with a gun to watch your ass, you either pay for it yourself or you are that person with a gun. You are not allowed to accept campaign money from anyone but your constituents; no corporations. Term limit imposed to ensure fresh ideas continuously circulate through the House and Senate. No felons allowed. Misdemeanors may also bar you from service. Remove age limits.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:17:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By macman37:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Bench press 200 lbs


You just eliminated 95% of Arfcom

That's not necessarily a bad thing...


How about "bench press your own body weight"
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:20:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By macman37:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Bench press 200 lbs


You just eliminated 95% of Arfcom

That's not necessarily a bad thing...


How about "bench press your own body weight"


I'm guessing you just raised the bar by using body weight, so to speak.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:35:10 AM EST
Senators selected by their respective state legislators. Congressman elected every 3 years instead of two. Ineligible for election/re election after age 70.


SCotUS Justices serve a single 10 year term.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 10:37:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By macman37:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Bench press 200 lbs


You just eliminated 95% of Arfcom

That's not necessarily a bad thing...


How about "bench press your own body weight"


Lessee here ... 235 (probably closer to 240 after the holidays) yeah I can pull that off. Once or twice.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 11:26:54 AM EST
Court of Political Justice




From Lone Star Planet, H Beam Piper (copyright expired, available free on the net)

Well, those nine men are judges," she began. "The one in the middle is President Judge Nelson. You've met his son--the Ranger officer who chased you from the spaceport. He's a regular jurist. The other eight are prominent citizens who are drawn from a panel, like a jury. The men at the table on the left are the prosecution: friends of the politician who was killed. And the ones on the right are the defense: they'll try to prove that the dead man got what was coming to him. The ones in the middle are friends of the court: they're just anybody who has any interest in the case--people who want to get some point of law cleared up, or see some precedent established, or something like that."

"You seem to assume that this is a homicide case," I mentioned.

"They generally are. Sometimes mayhem, or wounding, or simple assault, but--"

There had been some sort of conference going on in the open space of floor between the judges' bench and the three tables. It broke up, now, and the judge in the middle rapped with his gavel.

"Are you gentlemen ready?" he asked. "All right, then. Court of Political Justice of the Confederate Continents of New Texas is now in session. Case of the friends of S. Austin Maverick, deceased, late of James Bowie Continent, versus Wilbur Whately."

"My God, did somebody finally kill Aus Maverick?" Gail whispered.

On the center table, in front of the friends of the court, both sides seemed to have piled their exhibits; among the litter I saw some torn clothing, a big white sombrero covered with blood, and a long machete.

"The general nature of the case," the judge was saying, "is that the defendant, Wilbur Whately, of Sam Houston Continent, is here charged with divers offenses arising from the death of the Honorable S. Austin Maverick, whom he killed on the front steps of the Legislative Assembly Building, here in New Austin...."


What goes on here? I thought angrily. This is the rankest instance of a pre-judged case I've ever seen. I started to say as much to Gail, but she hushed me.

"I want to hear the specifications," she said.

A man at the prosecution table had risen.

"Please the court," he began, "the defendant, Wilbur Whately, is here charged with political irresponsibility and excessive atrocity in exercising his constitutional right of criticism of a practicing politician.

"The specifications are, as follows: That, on the afternoon of May Seventh, Anno Domini 2193, the defendant here present did arm himself with a machete, said machete not being one of his normal and accustomed weapons, and did loiter in wait on the front steps of the Legislative Assembly Building in the city of New Austin, Continent of Sam Houston, and did approach the decedent, addressing him in abusive, obscene, and
indecent language, and did set upon and attack him with the machete aforesaid, causing the said decedent, S. Austin Maverick, to die."

The court wanted to know how the defendant would plead. Somebody, without bothering to rise, said, "Not guilty, Your Honor," from the defense table.

There was a brief scraping of chairs; four of five men from the defense and the prosecution tables got up and advanced to confer in front of the bench, comparing sheets of paper. The man who had read the charges, obviously the chief prosecutor, made himself the spokesman.

"Your Honor, defense and prosecution wish to enter the following stipulations: That the decedent was a practicing politician within the meaning of the Constitution, that he met his death in the manner stated in the coroner's report, and that he was killed by the defendant, Wilbur Whately."

"Is that agreeable to you, Mr. Vincent?" the judge wanted to know.

The defense answered affirmatively. I sat back, gaping like a fool. Why, that was practically--no, it _was_--a confession.

"All right, gentlemen," the judge said. "Now we have all that out of the way, let's get on with the case."

As though there were any case to get on with! I fully expected them to take it on from there in song, words by Gilbert and music by Sullivan.

"Well, Your Honor, we have a number of character witnesses," the prosecution -- prosecution, for God's sake! --announced.

"Skip them," the defense said. "We stipulate."

"But you can't stipulate character testimony," the prosecution argued. "You don't know what our witnesses are going to testify to."

"Sure we do: they're going to give us a big long shaggy-dog story about the Life and Miracles of Saint Austin Maverick. We'll agree in advance to all that; this case is concerned only with his record as a politician. And as he spent the last fifteen years in the Senate, that's all a matter of public record. I assume that the prosecution is going to
introduce all that, too?"

"Well, naturally ..." the prosecutor began.

"Including his public acts on the last day of his life?" the counsel for the defense demanded. "His actions on the morning of May seventh as chairman of the Finance and Revenue Committee? You going to introduce that as evidence for the prosecution?"

"Well, now ..." the prosecutor began.

"Your Honor, we ask to have a certified copy of the proceedings of the Senate Finance and Revenue Committee for the morning of May Seventh, 2193, read into the record of this court," the counsel for the defense said. "And thereafter, we rest our case."

"Has the prosecution anything to say before we close the court?" Judge Nelson inquired.

"Well, Your Honor, this seems ... that is, we ought to hear both sides of it. My old friend, Aus Maverick, was really a fine man; he did a lot of good for the people of his continent.
..."

"Yeah, we'd of lynched him, when he got back, if somebody hadn't chopped him up here in New Austin!" a voice from the rear of the courtroom broke in.

The prosecution hemmed and hawed for a moment, and then announced, in a hasty mumble, that it rested.

"I will now close the court," Judge Nelson said. "I advise everybody to keep your seats. I don't think it's going to be closed very long."

And then, he actually closed the court; pressing a button on the bench, he raised a high black screen in front of him and his colleagues. It stayed up for some sixty seconds, and then dropped again.

"The Court of Political Justice has reached a verdict," he announced. "Wilbur Whately, and your attorney, approach and hear the verdict."

The defense lawyer motioned a young man who had been sitting beside him to rise. In the silence that had fallen, I could hear the defendant's boots squeaking as he went forward to hear his fate. The judge picked up a belt and a pair of pistols that had been lying in front of him.

"Wilbur Whately," he began, "this court is proud to announce that you have been unanimously acquitted of the charge of political irresponsibility, and of unjustified and excessive atrocity.

"There was one dissenting vote on acquitting you of the charge of political irresponsibility; one of the associate judges felt that the late unmitigated scoundrel, Austin Maverick, ought to have been skinned alive, an inch at a time. You are, however, acquitted of that charge, too.

"You all know," he continued, addressing the entire assemblage, "the reason for which this young hero cut down that monster of political iniquity, S. Austin Maverick. On the very morning of his justly-merited death, Austin Maverick, using the powers of his political influence, rammed through the Finance and Revenue Committee a bill entitled 'An Act
for the Taxing of Personal Incomes, and for the Levying of a Withholding Tax.' Fellow citizens, words fail me to express my horror of this diabolic proposition, this proposed instrument of tyrannical extortion, borrowed from the Dark Ages of the Twentieth Century! Why, if this young nobleman had not taken his blade in hand, I'd have killed the sonofabitch, myself!"

He leaned forward, extending the belt and holsters to the defendant.

"I therefore restore to you your weapons, taken from you when, in compliance with the law, you were formally arrested. Buckle them on, and, assuming your weapons again, go forth from this court a free man, Wilbur Whately. And take with you that machete with which you vindicated the liberties and rights of all New Texans. Bear it reverently to your
home, hang it among your lares and penates, cherish it, and dying, mention it within your will, bequeathing it as a rich legacy unto your issue! Court adjourned; next session 0900 tomorrow. For Chrissake, let's get out of here before the barbecue's over!"



"Why, the purpose of that court seems to be to acquit murderers."

"Murderers?" She was indignant. "That wasn't murder. He just killed a politician. All the court could do was determine whether or not the politician needed it, and while I never heard about Maverick's income-tax proposition, I can't see how they could have brought in any other kind of a verdict. Of all the outrageous things!"


Second law they had in the story: A person can only be tried once for any particular act. No double jeopardy from the state acquitting and then the feds trying the man again for the same acts.

Third law: Dueling legalised. A defense to prosecution is that the feller needed killing and it was a fair fight.

There's more, but those will do for a start.


Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:04:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:

How about "bench press your own body weight"


I think old Teddy can drink his own body weight in Scotch.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:12:51 PM EST
Every provision suggested, every amendment proposed, every bill passed, the Congressman must make a public speech, televised or otherwise broadcast by the media, explaining why each point in the legislation is constitutionally appropriate, why it is worth spending money on, and why we should support it.

Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:36:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/3/2007 12:37:00 PM EST by Airwolf]

Originally Posted By Horseman:
Every provision suggested, every amendment proposed, every bill passed, the Congressman must make a public speech, televised or otherwise broadcast by the media, explaining why each point in the legislation is constitutionally appropriate, why it is worth spending money on, and why we should support it.



"Why, if we had to do that we could not pass most of the laws we enact around here."
[Sen. John Glenn 1996-07-16, in opposition to a proposed law requiring all new laws to cite their explicit constitutional authorization]

I remember this being quoted before but I can't come up with any "official" type of confirmation on Google.

I agree with Horseman on this one. You have to quote the section of the Constitution that permits the law you're proposing. No cite, no bill. If you submit more than x number of bills with unsupported cites, you receive sanctions. Keep doing it and you're expelled from government office.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:42:10 PM EST
Hmm...

I'm thinking making them sign a contract saying they will not serve more than two terms in any single government position, nor more than four terms in all government positions combined. None of this senator-for-life business like Byrd and Teddy Kennedy.

Two terms is the limit for Presidents, why not for other levels of government?
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:45:40 PM EST
Add honesty to the list.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 12:59:11 PM EST
Sign an oath to never violate the Constitution or be put to death if ArfCom decides you are in violation of such
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:05:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By macman37:

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Bench press 200 lbs


You just eliminated 95% of Arfcom

That's not necessarily a bad thing...


How about "bench press your own body weight"


Woot only 137lbs! I should run.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:21:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By MC_Man:
Add honesty to the list.


Oops. No more politicians.

Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:23:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/3/2007 1:25:30 PM EST by 82ndAbn]
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:24:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
They must think higher of the US Constitution than the Communist Manifesto.


I second the motion!
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:27:52 PM EST
Be a Republican.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:34:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:36:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By -Absolut-:
Be a Republican.


Hey, if we're playing make believe then why not shoot for the stars, right?
Exactly
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:45:32 PM EST
that lone star book sounds awesome.

new rules: no liberals

being able to punch people that make you mad.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 1:51:18 PM EST
Has an ass-kicking roundhouse kick ... for all the libtards of course ...
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 3:36:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrKandiyohi:

Originally Posted By Hokie:

How about "bench press your own body weight"


I think old Teddy can drink his own body weight in Scotch.


That's why we just need to find a way to revive him, he's well preserved

The world needs Teddy right about now.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 3:45:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/3/2007 3:45:54 PM EST by Fatbert]

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By MrKandiyohi:

Originally Posted By Hokie:

How about "bench press your own body weight"


I think old Teddy can drink his own body weight in Scotch.


That's why we just need to find a way to revive him, he's well preserved

The world needs Teddy right about now.


I think that he's talking about Jabba the Kennedy.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 3:47:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/3/2007 3:50:24 PM EST by Hokie]

Originally Posted By Fatbert:

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By MrKandiyohi:

Originally Posted By Hokie:

How about "bench press your own body weight"


I think old Teddy can drink his own body weight in Scotch.


That's why we just need to find a way to revive him, he's well preserved

The world needs Teddy right about now.


I think that he's talking about Jabba the Kennedy.



lol....oops. Major miscommunication. My apologies, I'm on a "What would Teddy Roosevelt do" kick.
Link Posted: 1/3/2007 3:59:18 PM EST
Senators would receive, in addition to the existing medical benefits, transportation and housing allowances, an annual salary equal to, but no more than the average annual wage of a citizen of their state, for the duration of their terms - such a term to be no more than six consecutive years;

Congressional Representatives would receive, in addition to the existing medical benefits, transportation and housing allowances, an annual salary equal to, but no more than the average annual wage of a citizen of their congressional district, for the duration of their terms - such a term to be no more than four consecutive years.


OK - tried to sneak in a twofer...
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