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Posted: 10/11/2007 7:34:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 7:36:25 PM EDT by AR-10]
Take it out every two or three months and shake it up.
Shake it hard, and shake it a lot.

That way if you ever need to use it, it might actually work.


Public Service Announcement # 86.999.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 7:35:34 PM EDT
Also realize that if you have a gasoline fire, it ain't gonna do jack.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 7:36:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ampn:
Also realize that if you have a gasoline fire, it ain't gonna do jack.


And that would be PSA 87.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 7:43:58 PM EDT
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 7:55:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR-10:
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?


I'm not sure about that one.

Your advice about shaking the fire extinguisher is sound for a dry chemical type (keeps the stuff inside from compacting into a solid).

The problem is that the average small portable extinguisher is too small to combat a full-on gas fire. Plus, that stuff that comes out of the extinguisher is corrosive and makes a HUGE mess that's very difficult to clean up.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 7:56:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 8:01:12 PM EDT by AR-10]
Helooooh.
Thanks anmp

We all carry fire extinguishers in the vehicle, right?

What kind should it be? Mine has always been a dry powder inside, but I don't know what it's rated for.

Putting out burning fuel would be a desireable property.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:04:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 8:05:35 PM EDT by Gamma762]

Originally Posted By ampn:

Originally Posted By AR-10:
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?


I'm not sure about that one.

Your advice about shaking the fire extinguisher is sound for a dry chemical type (keeps the stuff inside from compacting into a solid).

The problem is that the average small portable extinguisher is too small to combat a full-on gas fire. Plus, that stuff that comes out of the extinguisher is corrosive and makes a HUGE mess that's very difficult to clean up.

ABC dry chem extinguishers are, for auto use I'd recommend a BC powder (sodium bicarb, or purple K is better). A 5lb purple K extinguisher can put out a decent size gasoline fire.

Ansul and probably others make cartridge-type extinguishers which don't need to be shaken up for maintenance for automotive applications.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:04:35 PM EDT
Corrosiveness is not a major consideration if there is someone in the vehicle.

Well it is, but you get my point.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:05:29 PM EDT
I think I know the answer to this one!

ABC extinguishers are good for all kinds of fires. Well, except for magnesium/flammable metals.

Yes, it will put out a gasoline fire, but not a fully involved vehicle fire. If your headliner is on fire, it is probably too late for the extinguisher.

When you have that fuel line leak and ignite, you can put it out with that little bitty canister. But sweep the base of the fire, pushing it away from you.

If you do have a fire under the hood... pop the hood. That damn cable melts and then it is a PITA to pop... usually involves a lot of bending and chopping. Just pull the under dash release, don't open the hood all the way... you may get burned, but will get a facefull of nasty smoke.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:06:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR-10:
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?


The kind I bring with me when you call.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:06:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 8:14:27 PM EDT by AR-10]

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
ABC dry chem extinguishers are, for auto use I'd recommend a BC powder (sodium bicarb, or purple K is better). A 5lb purple K extinguisher can put out a decent size gasoline fire.


Thanks. I'll have to check mine in the morning.

And thank you, Major Monroe. Very good info.


Also, I should have been a little more clear. I was thinking about a vehicle on it's top with a small fire starting to spread. Not your typical fire I suppose.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:08:01 PM EDT
I grabbed a small extinguisher that was in our cabin for use in my car, but it's dead and I don't know if it's worth recharging (it's probably as old as I am). Where's someplace I can get a cheap extinguisher for the car?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:08:36 PM EDT
Lowe's or HD
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:09:38 PM EDT
I have put out a vehicle fire (carb leak with puddled fuel on manifold) with a 1 pounder. But if the fuel is dripping on an exhaust manifold, you are out of luck even with a halon. Only a 5 pound CO2 has the cooling power for that.

Back when I was in the Army, we had a forced-air space heater (Herman-Nelson) that had the blower fan fail. Anyhow, fuel was dripping into the combustion pot and the lack of combustion/cooling air caused flames to shoot out of the stack.

I DUMPED a 5 pound BC into the combustion chamber and slammed it shut. It rekindled within seconds. Only the CO2 was good enough for that fire.

BTW, I have had a little more than casual fire fighting training.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:12:28 PM EDT
I have 2 ABCs in each vehicle but they only get moved if someone at the car wash does it... OOOPS!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:20:06 PM EDT
I am pretty sure this guy wishes he had his, in fact in the post he makes a comment.
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=8&f=22&t=283846
Too bad really. I just recently started to carry one with me, in my new Tundra it fits perfectly wedged between the rear seat and the interior trim panel/rear corner of my cab.
I hope that if I ever use it, it might be to help someone else in need, but for damn sure want it to work no matter what.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:21:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR-10:
Corrosiveness is not a major consideration if there is someone in the vehicle.

Well it is, but you get my point.
I will only use my fire extinguisher if there is a life involved or something of tremendous property value, such as a case of guns, otherwise I just let the vehicle burn. I had a friend who had an underhood fire, and a good samaritan appeared and put out the fire. The insurance company considered it minor damage and had the vehicle repaired, but the inside of the passenger cabin always had that of burnt wire insulation smell that you just can't get rid of.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:25:07 PM EDT
So my ABC extinguishers in my truck won't fight gasoline fires? (or in this case Diesel?)
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:29:59 PM EDT
www.rocky-road.com/jeepfire.html

fire extinguisher bling.

Don't have one just thought they were interesting...
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:35:49 PM EDT
How about electrical fires? About 4 or 5 years ago we were sitting in the kitchen eating supper when someone came pounding on the front door. It was one of our neighbors, all out of breath saying that his car (I think it was a Jimmy or something) was on fire and asking if we had a fire extinguisher. The little dry chem one that we had under the sink seemed to do the trick, but it made a heck of a mess. Something in the fuse block had sparked and started on fire right above the pedals.

What's a more common vehicle fire, fuel or electrical? Does the same extinguisher work for both?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:38:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 8:41:04 PM EDT by A_Free_Man]

Originally Posted By Gamma762:

Originally Posted By ampn:

Originally Posted By AR-10:
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?


I'm not sure about that one.

Your advice about shaking the fire extinguisher is sound for a dry chemical type (keeps the stuff inside from compacting into a solid).

The problem is that the average small portable extinguisher is too small to combat a full-on gas fire. Plus, that stuff that comes out of the extinguisher is corrosive and makes a HUGE mess that's very difficult to clean up.

ABC dry chem extinguishers are, for auto use I'd recommend a BC powder (sodium bicarb, or purple K is better). A 5lb purple K extinguisher can put out a decent size gasoline fire.

Ansul and probably others make cartridge-type extinguishers which don't need to be shaken up for maintenance for automotive applications.


EXACTLY correct!!!

Dry powder is good for both fuel and electrical.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 8:44:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SDeadeye:
How about electrical fires? About 4 or 5 years ago we were sitting in the kitchen eating supper when someone came pounding on the front door. It was one of our neighbors, all out of breath saying that his car (I think it was a Jimmy or something) was on fire and asking if we had a fire extinguisher. The little dry chem one that we had under the sink seemed to do the trick, but it made a heck of a mess. Something in the fuse block had sparked and started on fire right above the pedals.

What's a more common vehicle fire, fuel or electrical? Does the same extinguisher work for both?



A= normal combustibles (wood, paper, plastic, etc)
B= Flammable liquids
C= Energized electrical equipment (deenergize and it is an A or B fire)

Except for old cars with lotsa oil sludge build up on the manifold, or a leaking/broken fuel line, most unintentional car fires I see are electrically ignited.

ABC will work for all of you automotive firefighting needs.

Obviously, if you have 20 gallons of burning fuel, and the tires are burning... you probably don't have a big enough ABC extinguisher. You might need some professional assistance.

I keep a 20# in the house, and a 2# in my truck.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 3:49:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CygnusX-1:
I am pretty sure this guy wishes he had his, in fact in the post he makes a comment.
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=8&f=22&t=283846
Too bad really. I just recently started to carry one with me, in my new Tundra it fits perfectly wedged between the rear seat and the interior trim panel/rear corner of my cab.
I hope that if I ever use it, it might be to help someone else in need, but for damn sure want it to work no matter what.


You did it backwards...

The FIRST pop-up is where you type "TRUCK FIRE"
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 3:53:43 AM EDT
Try to put out a vehicle fire?? No, not unless it was endangering a structure near by. I wish my car would catch fire on the road. I owe twice what its worth!! God bless GAP insurance... (Hope my insurance company doesnt mointor ARFCOM)
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 3:55:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AR-10:
What type of fire extinguisher is good for your typical vehicle fire, with the broken gas line and the roof lining starting to go?



Had that exact type of fire happen a few years ago at my base. I happened to be driving by and saw it, stopped and got out the ABC fire extinguisher that I had in the patrol car and dumped the whole thing through the grill. After it ran out the vehicle still burned to the ground...no thanks to our trusty fire fighters who couldn't figure out how to charge their lines (they remind me of the fire fighters from the movie Roxanne)
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 3:55:48 AM EDT
I carry a 5lb FE-36 extinguisher in my jeep.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 4:03:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2007 4:03:32 AM EDT by Kharn]
I pwn3d page 2

Dont forget to strap your fire extinguisher to the passenger's A-pillar when you put on your muffler's new fart-tips.

Kharn
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 4:05:43 AM EDT
I keep one ABC in every vehicle I own and seven at my shop. There has to be one on every fork lift per the fire department and they have to be recertified every year.
I also keep two in my house and two in my garage which is about 200 feet from the house.
I have had a truck fire and it scared the shit out of me. Especially since my son was
in a car seat when it went up. The power steering line got a hole in it and sprayed one the manifold and woosh! I had a camper on the truck and used the one in the camper.
It was a pretty small one so now I keep #2's as a minimum. Plus I have large co2 extingushers by my machines that I want to keep clean just in case it happenes.

joe
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 4:33:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/12/2007 4:50:27 AM EDT by PFD147]

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
I have put out a vehicle fire (carb leak with puddled fuel on manifold) with a 1 pounder. But if the fuel is dripping on an exhaust manifold, you are out of luck even with a halon. Only a 5 pound CO2 has the cooling power for that.

Back when I was in the Army, we had a forced-air space heater (Herman-Nelson) that had the blower fan fail. Anyhow, fuel was dripping into the combustion pot and the lack of combustion/cooling air caused flames to shoot out of the stack.

I DUMPED a 5 pound BC into the combustion chamber and slammed it shut. It rekindled within seconds. Only the CO2 was good enough for that fire.

BTW, I have had a little more than casual fire fighting training.


The main use of a CO extinguisher is not to cool the fire but to rob it of Oxygen and smother it out, the cooling effect is negligible. Fire needs Fuel, Heat and Oxygen to burn (old school fire triangle) remove any of those and the fire goes buh-bye.

If the fire is really going where the tires and engine compartment are involved an extinguisher isn't going to cut it you are going to need copious amounts of water. If it breaches into the passenger compartment, let it burn. Most states require that if the car has a fire in the interior compartment, the car gets totaled. Another problem is that manufacturers are using magnesium and magalloy all over cars now. Transmissions, reinforcing bars and crossbraces and in the rims of the wheels. The only way to put out a metal fire is a lot of Purple K or other class D chemical or LOTS and LOTS of water (which causes small expolsions and lots of sparks). Also, if you have a car fire stay out of the smoke. Cars nowadays have lots of synthetics, they produce benzene, sodium cyanide, carbon monoxide and several other gasses you don't want to be breathing in. There is a reason we wear turnouts and SCBA at these.

I have 4 extinguishers. two 20lb ABC dry chems and two 2 1/2 gal pressurized water. I carry one of the ABC's in my truck and one of the APW's I have put AFFF foam into the water and it works pretty well for fuel type fires, it also makes kind of a "light water" for class A fires.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 5:49:14 AM EDT
I have a 5 lb ABC FE in each of my vehicles, a 10 pounder, and 4-5 5 lbs at home and in the garage and one in my shed.

New ones are expensive. I got most of mine by buying them used from a FE dealer. Walk in and ask the service manager if he has any good dry chemical FE's. I lucked out that the one I asked had just changed out about 100 at an apartment complex that got them replaced with 10 lbers.

I got 57 five lb ABC FE's for about $11 each as part of group buy with my 4x4 club; new equivalent ones were $55 each.

Several FE's saved my 4runner several years ago when ATF puked out of the fill port onto the hot exhaust manifold. I was very fortunate that several people were close that doused it with an ABC FE and put the fire out. I had the auto switched out with a manual tranny a week later.

Without those FE's I would have lost the vehicle (we were about 1-2 hours away from a Fire Department assuming they would have even agreed to go down into the valley where we were and could have gotten to where we were (we were four wheeling in the bottom of Coppinger Cove, TN).

Link Posted: 10/12/2007 6:12:12 AM EDT
Some searches and reading about fire extinguishers are well worth it in my opinion.

I consider the 2 liter sized fire extinguishers to be about the smallest I want to have around.

The small ones are what they are and I just don't see them being all that useful.

If I wanted one worth refilling I would go with a commercial type fire extinguisher. As it is I am comfortable with the home depot and lowes stuff with some plastic here and there.

If you keep a fire extinguisher in the vehicle make sure it is secured, as a teenager I flipped a jeep and had a fire extinguisher go off inside a canvas bag because something broke as it banged around the inside of the jeep. The bag contained it and I did not notice this problem until going through all my stuff later on.

And also make sure you can get to your fire extinguisher as well, keeping it in the bed box of the truck that is tough to get to is probably not the best place to keep the fire extinguisher.

I recomend some reading on what the wrong sorts of fire extinguishers can do to a vehicle's electical system. For small stuff my bottle of pop or my gallon of water might be enough. Depends on what it is.

I am still amazed that everyone who actually cooks in their kitchen does not keep some baking soda around for accidental grease fires. I have never had a problem but baking soda is darn cheap and easy compared to a fire extinguisher.

For those who want to learn more I recomend talking to some fire fighters and seeing what they can offer for an education.

I have used fire extinguishers in set up demonstrations and what not but have never had the added stress of seeing my home or vehicle on fire.

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