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Posted: 2/12/2006 11:02:31 PM EDT
What does the process do, if anything, to the base metal? Embrittlement? Base metal is gunsteel, variety and hardness is unknown.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 11:40:56 PM EDT
Found my answer. Hydrogen embrittlement is possible.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 12:08:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 6:50:09 AM EDT
Damn straight G....
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 6:55:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gmtmaster:
Base metal is gunsteel, variety and hardness is unknown.



What is gunsteel? is that like cold rolled? Or is it like a cheap pot steel?
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 8:16:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:

Originally Posted By gmtmaster:
Base metal is gunsteel, variety and hardness is unknown.



What is gunsteel? is that like cold rolled? Or is it like a cheap pot steel?


Gun or ordinance steel, I have been told 4140 or 4150, with 4150 being the more expensive alloy.

gmtmaster: There are ways for a plater to minimize or eleminate "hydrogen embrittement," as I think this has been know for a long time. I have a factory hard-chromed LAR(Orem UT) Grizzly, and there is virtually zero wear for the fact that hard-chrome is reallly hard. I think I paid an extra $125 for this service back in 1985.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 8:24:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2006 8:30:40 AM EDT by The_Reaper]

Originally Posted By gmtmaster:
Found my answer. Hydrogen embrittlement is possible.



Hydrogen embrittlement is a temporary condition.

You can literally heat your metal in a kitchen oven for a short time to drive out the hydrogen.

Or, given a few days time, it diffuses out on it's own.

If you want to talk to our expert, IM me and I'll give you our phone number.
You can talk to our metallurgical engineer about it.


EDIT: Our engineer informed me that if the part being plated has, for whatever reason,
any internal stresses that existed before being plated, that the hydrogen the dissolves into
the steel from the plating process can cause cracking if it is not promptly heated to drive out
the hydrogen. Specific post plating treatment varies depending on the material in question.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 8:41:27 AM EDT
Hydrogen embrittlement, for those who aren't familiar with it, occurs in steel when
it is electroplated.

During the plating process, elemental hydrogen forms on the surface of the steel.

Elemental hydrogen will dissolve into the steel.
Actually, it will soak into it like water in a sponge.

It causes the steel to become brittle.... but only if the steel is under load or stressed.

An ideal steel bar that is saturated with hydrogen will be fine if left alone so the hydrogen
can diffuse back out.

But the same steel bar, if put under load, can EASILY crack in half.

With more and more places running on this "just in time" manufacturing practice,
we are seeing more and more examples of it.

A local company was bolting electric motors to a frame with bolts that were fresh from plating.

The finished units were all sitting in a warehouse, and about 3 days later all of the motors
fell out because the bolts spontaneously broke. Pretty funny actually.

They started with blaming the guy who installed the motors, saying he tightened the bolts
too tight. Electron microscopy revealed the classic fracture surface that screamed
hydrogen embrittlement.

Link Posted: 2/13/2006 8:44:32 AM EDT
I've hardchromed my IPSC pistols for years, makes them last almost forever, and easier to clean.

...kinda like an M16 barrel.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 5:56:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:

Originally Posted By gmtmaster:
Base metal is gunsteel, variety and hardness is unknown.



What is gunsteel? is that like cold rolled? Or is it like a cheap pot steel?


Gun or ordinance steel, I have been told 4140 or 4150, with 4150 being the more expensive alloy.

gmtmaster: There are ways for a plater to minimize or eleminate "hydrogen embrittement," as I think this has been know for a long time. I have a factory hard-chromed LAR(Orem UT) Grizzly, and there is virtually zero wear for the fact that hard-chrome is reallly hard. I think I paid an extra $125 for this service back in 1985.



4130 and 4140 Chrome Molly are the most common.. Sorry I was being a smart ass..
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 6:07:14 PM EDT
I got my XD chromed...I like it. Cleaning is a simple task..wipe off.
Link Posted: 2/13/2006 6:18:48 PM EDT
I had mine done at Checkmate custom and have been very happy with it. No problem after @8'000 rds.
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