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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/16/2002 4:16:53 PM EST
Hey guys, It has been a while since I have been shooting my rifles because the last time I shot I had a terrible flinch. Well I shot again today and it is still there. What developed this was a few years ago I was shooting a friends 7 mag and he had the scope mounted too far back and when I shot I didn't have a good hold and well you guessed it....it broke my nose! Anyways ever since then I've had a terrible flinch when shooting. Last year I went out and bought a remington 7400 and had it ported to help dissipate the recoil. When I have the rifle on a rest I have no problem flinching but when lying prone, shooting offhand, or any other way I've got a flinch. Any suggestions for overcoming it? When I pull the trigger I feel my eye that is looking through the scope want to close. I have looked into hiring an instructor and apparently there is not anyone in my area that teaches rifle shooting(my area is primarily concerned with pistols/shotguns). Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks. -lee-
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:23:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:29:05 PM EST
Dry firing? The ol' shooting with a buddy drill: He'll either load, or not load a round, and will carefully hand the rifle to you, the shooter. You'll not know if the rifle is loaded, but you'll shoot everytime as if it were. Maybe some will think this an unsafe practice?
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:30:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/16/2002 4:31:10 PM EST by Graffiti]
I'm not sure if this helps. But you might want to practice dry fire. Get a "snap cap" which basically is a regular ammo minus gun powder and primer. It won't go "bang" when you shoot and you won't kill anyone around you because nothing is coming out of the barrel. But it will load from magazine, feed into the chamber and eject like regular ammo. Its ideal for practicing in privacy of your own home. Make sure you don't mix your real ammo with the snap cap though. Damn, IMHO beat me to it ;)
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:38:08 PM EST
I went through the same thing with handguns... I'd gotten into rifle cartridge 'handcannons' and developed a nice flinch... the suggestions you've gotten so far are great: snap caps, dummy rounds loaded by a friend... I used those tricks but also stepped back, and started handguns again with a Smith .22 revolver. Take out a small caliber and learn to 'enjoy' shooting again, then work yourself back up to what you're comfortable shooting. Good luck!
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:38:56 PM EST
Here's a trick that might help. Get somebody to load you up some dummy rounds, or buy some snap caps. When you go shooting ,have a buddy load the rifle for you (without you looking), randomly using the dummy rds and live ammo. After a couple dozen "shots" you will no longer be able to "anticipate" what will happen, and should be concentrating on the actual mechanics of shooting.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 4:42:28 PM EST
Knowing the problem is half the answer. I usually find that I tense-up less and less the more and more I shoot. So first, I'd try shooting more. Second, go plinking rather than target shooting. It will be better for the breathing and relaxing part of shooting... Also, I find that I can relax with a .300 Wby magnum for about 5-10 rounds or so (maybe more if I ever shot the gun more... but it is not a gun made for a lot of shooting). But even when I'm trying not to tense, I begin to tense-up... and I realize why these hunting loads never will make it as good target loads. Anyway, try going to the much gentler 308 rather than 7 mm Magnum... if target shooting is your goal.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:26:03 PM EST
Practice, practice, practice... The more you shoot, the less you will "flinch" or "tense-up"... What I did to improve my handgun accuracy, was to shoot the larger caliber (.454 casull/.44mag), heavy recoiling guns first, then switch to the lighter guns... You get used to the heavy recoil, and then the 9mm or .38 seems like a cap gun... Works the same on rifles... I actually adjusted my (bolt gun) triggers down to around 1.5 lbs so they would fire before I could flinch... Just a quick light pull would drop the hammer... Very difficult to anticipate the recoil this way... Really tightened up my groups ALOT... I too found it VERY difficult to shoot a 7mm Rem Mag more than 5-7 shots before flinching... .308 is the way to go... Mild recoil, and VERY accurate...
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 5:31:32 PM EST
The best advise I see here is to dry fire. Don't mix and match full rounds and fake. Dry fire for a day. Then shoot a .22 rim fire. Work back into it. Learn to roll with the punch.
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 6:28:59 PM EST
I was taught long ago that this is called "anticipating the shot" I hate it.First time was when a stepdad called me a pussy for not firing his MOD.1911(I was 9yrs. old)Thank Fully it was the last round and slide action left a nasty rip in his hand as he forced me to shoot said Pistola. Now days if I want to go out and make any shots worth a damn I usually go it alone with out tagalongs.........
Link Posted: 7/16/2002 6:48:16 PM EST
Where are you shooting? MSSA? The dummy round idea is the way to go. You might also consider working out with a nice 22 for a while. It's relaxing, cheap, and always helps your form.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 3:39:11 AM EST
Thanks for the advice guys. I'll take my 22lr out this weekend and start shooting with it and work my way back into it. After that I'll probably start shooting my ar-15 and then back into my rem 7400. I guess a gradual step up would be best? Thanks again for all the advice. Oh and I am also going to get a couple of those snap caps so I can practice dry firing. Thanks again I really appreciate it. -lee-
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 3:40:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rustygun: Where are you shooting? MSSA? The dummy round idea is the way to go. You might also consider working out with a nice 22 for a while. It's relaxing, cheap, and always helps your form.
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Rusty, I've got a farm that is about an hour out of Memphis and that is where I go most. I haven't joined MSSA yet but probably will in the near future. Are you a member there?
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:04:51 AM EST
Question for Graffiti and Halfcocked: Why such concern over mixing live and dummy / snap cap rounds? Is your concern a safety thing? I honestly don't see the concern. Quite frankly, mixing ball and dummy rounds is one of the best ways I have discovered to teach people not to anticipate shots form magazine fed weapons. An added bonus is that it is great for immediate action drills. When you are done, the brass is brass and the snap-caps / dummies are returned to their case. I just don't see the big deal. Adam
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:35:29 AM EST
I'm jealous of your farm. That's the deal. I'm in MSSA. It's a paradise out there. It's really nice unlike some ranges that always seem to be built on a toxic waste dump sight. They are threatening to close the county range again so it may soon be the only game in town.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:41:01 AM EST
I concur with the .22. Get a nice semi & burn a brick or 2. Scott
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:46:38 AM EST
shoot 22lr for a month or so, then work back up. youve got strong conditioning to overcome, so dont expect immediate results.
Link Posted: 7/17/2002 4:51:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By Adam_White: Question for Graffiti and Halfcocked: Why such concern over mixing live and dummy / snap cap rounds? Is your concern a safety thing? I honestly don't see the concern. Quite frankly, mixing ball and dummy rounds is one of the best ways I have discovered to teach people not to anticipate shots form magazine fed weapons. An added bonus is that it is great for immediate action drills. When you are done, the brass is brass and the snap-caps / dummies are returned to their case. I just don't see the big deal. Adam
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I think their concern is mixing them in an environment where a discharge is a bad idea, like say practicing in your living room. If you're at the range, there should be no problem mixing them together. On a related note, I flinched and jerked firing Brouhaha's little kel-tec .32 the first time at the shoot this weekend! I think it was a reaction because it had a really long trigger pull like the first pistol I ever shot as a kid. I had no problems with the HK91 though, so I guess that redeems me. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
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