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Posted: 12/4/2007 8:50:58 AM EDT
After hundreds of dollars spent on outdoor gear to keep myself dry and warm in inclement weather, I've finally decided that expensive "breathable" rain suits, gor-tex boots, sneakers, and waterproof gloves and socks do little to nothing at preventing moisture from getting in at you while out trekking through a storm. And the more something costs, the worse it actually performs!

Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:52:53 AM EDT
Yep. That's why I go naked in the rain.

Of course, I'm down south. I imagine up north I'd freeze to death.

Shane
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:55:44 AM EDT
stayin' up in the fucking house has it's plus side
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:55:45 AM EDT
You must be buying shit stuff. I have been caught in the middle of storms high up on climbs,
stayed relativly dry to were I didnt shiver due to the dropping temps and wind.

Try Marmot or Mammut items. They are designed for durability and warmth. I think they
are better then North Face. North Face or REI stuff IS CRAP. Even Arcteryx is good to, a
bit more pricey though.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:57:08 AM EDT

As I've grown older, I've found that the absolutely best, most reliable way of not getting wet in the rain ...

<­BR>



... is to stay indoors!
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:58:05 AM EDT
I've spent many a day in the pouring rail while deer, duck and goose hunting and never had a problem with my Gore-tex stuff keeping me dry. The only items that I have problems with are gloves. All those seams to seal means they always miss one.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 8:59:50 AM EDT
North Face gear is great. I have worked outside on a ski resort in the past, having to work in blizzards many times.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 9:01:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DD977GM2:
You must be buying shit stuff. I have been caught in the middle of storms high up on climbs,
stayed relativly dry to were I didnt shiver due to the dropping temps and wind.

Try Marmot or Mammut items. They are designed for durability and warmth. I think they
are better then North Face. North Face or REI stuff IS CRAP. Even Arcteryx is good to, a
bit more pricey though.
Yeah, The North Face had been my brand of choice while out an about. But I've tried out other brands that have performed no better.

Anyone ever try Sealskin sock, gloves? I've been thinking of giving them a whirl--my Hyperlite Stormsocks are useless!
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 9:07:01 AM EDT
Go check out a local outdoor shop for hikers and climbers. They can steer you in a good direction.
If you need cammo stuff, I have no idea for what is good and what isnt.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 9:09:30 AM EDT
You need to keep in mind that breathable gear has to be washed with some frequency and with the correct detergents in order to maintain its waterproof status.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 9:10:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 9:29:53 AM EDT
I agree with you to a point. Wool IMO is still the best insulator when wet but the new shell and water repelling materials are tough to beat to keep moisture away. North Face, Marker etc. have never let me down. I bought some socks a few weeks ago which have a mutli layer system to wick moisture away. They were pretty expensive (over $25 a pair) but man do they work. Like a lot of things you get what you pay for.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:18:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
You need to keep in mind that breathable gear has to be washed with some frequency and with the correct detergents in order to maintain its waterproof status.
Never knew this. Good heads up.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:26:47 AM EDT
When I am usually trekking through the woods. I usually take an olive drab vinyl poncho, a pair of rubber boots (as spares for if its way too wet), insulated clothing along with my mag vest..

It works fairly well, especially in downpour environments.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:34:07 AM EDT
If the rain is not a gully washing deluge and I will be spending the day outdoors then I wear my Filson wool coat. Naturally this is a cold rain I am talking about- not a summer shower.

My double Mackinac cruiser is the best hunting coat I have ever had. It keeps me warm when it is wet, and vapor passes out of the jacket so I don't freeze when I start to sweat.

Don't discount the value of very good wool. Wool is also quiet in the woods.

Downsides? The jacket gets very very heavy as it absorbs water.

Feet are a special case. I use rubber bottomed pacs when I hunt. When I hike I treat my leather boots with a product called Snoseal. It really does work.

Also consider a pair of gaiters. You get especially soaked in that area if you hike through the woods when it is raining.

Finally, don't neglect rubber overboots or shoes.

Goretex has a place, but frankly I read "water resistant" when I see something billed as "water proof".

Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:37:49 AM EDT
My ECWCS parka was far better than my M65 field jacket or the issue snivel gear in 1988.

Sorry, but the new stuff is great.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:42:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WoodDevil:

Originally Posted By PAEBR332:
You need to keep in mind that breathable gear has to be washed with some frequency and with the correct detergents in order to maintain its waterproof status.
Never knew this. Good heads up.


You should also apply a good beading agent. Check out Gore-Tex's website for care recommendations.
Link Posted: 12/4/2007 11:48:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
As I've grown older, I've found that the absolutely best, most reliable way of not getting wet in the rain ...

<­BR>



... is to stay in drawers!



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