Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 10/3/2011 7:09:31 AM EST
What's the difference? It's going on a digital camera if that matters.
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 8:25:43 AM EST



Circular.

Link Posted: 10/3/2011 10:54:43 AM EST
How often do most of you use a polarizing filter when shooting outdoors? Does it have a major effect on B&W shooting too?
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 11:21:33 AM EST
You will use it a lot and it does impact both color and black and white. With a circular polarizer you can dial in the amount of polarization you want.
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 1:27:53 PM EST
Assuming that you are using a camera that uses phase detect autofocus (which is almost every autofocus SLR camera ever made), you will want to get a circular polarizer.

With a circular polarizer you can dial in the amount of polarization you want.

You can "dial in the amount" on both types of polarizer.
Link Posted: 10/3/2011 4:03:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/3/2011 4:04:30 PM EST by M4-AK]
Originally Posted By Hoplophile:
Assuming that you are using a camera that uses phase detect autofocus (which is almost every autofocus SLR camera ever made), you will want to get a circular polarizer.

With a circular polarizer you can dial in the amount of polarization you want.

You can "dial in the amount" on both types of polarizer.


Okay, I bought the circular one. I'm using it on a Canon Superzoom, not a DSLR. First thing I noticed was that unless I was in full manual mode, the camera kept changing the viewfinder brightness to the point I could only see the darkening of the sky for a flash and then it would compensate. In full manual mode (Shutter and Aperture control with a match needle for exposure) I could see the changes when rotating the polarizer.
Top Top