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Posted: 9/1/2005 2:32:15 PM EDT
So, we have an AW ban. At least we don't have floods and twisters and tons of rattlesnakes and asshole blackwidow spiders. After seeing the news the last couple of days who cares if N.Y. has the highest taxes and no flashiders(on new ar's). I LOVE N.Y.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:34:44 PM EDT
Uh, there are plenty of states that do not have the natural disasters and drawbacks that you speak of and still have a rational view of RKBA. Just because NY is not crippled by a blizzard today or a smoking radioactive crater does not make it the best place to live in.

Viva Georgia!
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:35:00 PM EDT
not very old are you?
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:35:06 PM EDT
Ben Franklin identified that mindset long ago.


They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security, deserve neither liberty or security.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:35:10 PM EDT
if NYC got flooded you wouldn't
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:36:07 PM EDT
Good! Stay there!

I would rather deal with the blackwidows than more yankees.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:38:48 PM EDT
Living permanently in NY is certainly pushing the envelope of common sense and acceptability, but this week's events in the southeast make this scene not seem so bad:

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:39:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 2:41:47 PM EDT by valblade]
I didn't say N.Y was the best. I just said I'm not so bad off here as I thought.
Ice storm=big deal. I didn't even lose power in rochester.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:40:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 2:41:51 PM EDT by twonami]

Originally Posted By SWS:
Living permanently in NY is certainly pushing the envelope of common sense and acceptability, but this week's events in the southeast make this scene not seem so bad:

junior.apk.net/~scotts/snow.jpg


that is no problem at all vs. NOLA.
i'd rather be cold than hot and wet
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:43:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 2:44:30 PM EDT by valblade]
Ice storm=big deal. I was walking home during the middle of it. I didn't lose power. the great flood of 72. big deal the Mt Morris dam held up fine.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:46:25 PM EDT
Ha New York, you have got to be kidding.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:47:04 PM EDT
and you do not live near a major city?
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:47:29 PM EDT


I NY
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:49:26 PM EDT
Good for you.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:51:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:54:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:
www.pipelinenews.org/readerimages/hillary%20time.jpg

I NY


FU
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:54:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Plus it's nice here in the summer, not -->



Actually, NY and the northeast is pretty nice in the summer and fall.

It's just the other five months.....
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 2:56:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
www.pipelinenews.org/readerimages/hillary%20time.jpg

I NY


FU



You support the Empire State sending her to DC? (one step closer to the White House)
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:05:42 PM EDT
Why is everyone so sensitive? I never said N.Y is the best and your state sucks. I just said N.Y in not so bad after all. I would love to move. How can I. I have a good company I started here.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:07:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWS:

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Plus it's nice here in the summer, not -->



Actually, NY and the northeast is pretty nice in the summer and fall.

It's just the other five months.....



I like the winter
today is great though. sunny, mid 70s, finally low humidity, nice breeze
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:07:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By valblade:
Why is everyone so sensitive? I never said N.Y is the best and your state sucks. I just said N.Y in not so bad after all. I would love to move. How can I. I have a good company I started here.




(I think everyone's state has been picked on at one time or another, mine included, especially after the thieveing legislature raped us for a midnight pay raise - just that some folks are either too touchy or have no sense of humor)

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:25:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWS:

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Plus it's nice here in the summer, not -->



Actually, NY and the northeast is pretty nice in the summer and fall.

It's just the other five months.....



Actually it's nice all year round if you like winter sports. NY is a big state so it also depends on what region of NY you're talking about. In many areas the weather is still pretty nice except for three months of the year. If you're up by the Canadian border you'll freeze your ass off in the six month winter.

What sucks is the liberal asswipes in the major cities, high school/property/sales taxes, very high utility costs, high real estate/housing costs and restrictive handgun laws in NYC and to varying degrees in other counties.

On the plus side many areas have much higher salaries and employment opportunities then other areas around the country. NY is also a sportsman's paradise with millions of acres of public big/small game hunting areas and both salt and fresh water fishing. A good portion of NYS is also farm and rural communities.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:33:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By valblade:
So, we have an AW ban. At least we don't have floods and twisters and tons of rattlesnakes and asshole blackwidow spiders. After seeing the news the last couple of days who cares if N.Y. has the highest taxes and no flashiders(on new ar's). I LOVE N.Y.



Please define "tons..


from www.esf.edu/PUBPROG/brochure/snakes/snakes.htm
Venomous Snakes in New York: Distribution and Identification

There are only three species of poisonous snakes living in the wilds of New York (many other kinds may be found in the homes of private individuals and, occasionally, escapes occur!). These are the timber rattlesnake, the massasauga (erroneously called "pygmy rattler"), and the copperhead. All three are uncommon. The timber rattlesnake (listed as "Threatened" by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) enjoys the widest range; it is found mainly in the southeastern part of the state, except Long Island and New York City, with scattered populations as far north as Lake George and also along the Southern Tier in western New York. Its populations have been severely reduced, primarily due to bounties and commercial capture for snakeskin products and the pet trade. The massasauga (listed as "Endangered") occurs in only two locations, both large wetlands. One is located northeast of Syracuse and the other is west of Rochester. This species is the subject of a cooperative research program between researchers at SUNY-ESF and NYSDEC. The copperhead is mainly found along the lower Hudson Valley south of Kingston; it is essentially absent from the Catskills and points further west.

The timber rattler and massasauga both possess a rattle at the end of their tails. It is made of a series of hollow scales that produce a distinct buzz when the snake vibrates its tail (a new one is added each time the snake sheds its skin, which may be several times a year). Both rattlers are sort of chunky snakes but the timber rattlesnake can attain lengths of up to six feet while the massasauga barely reaches three feet. A timber rattler's head is much wider than a massasauga's and there are numerous small scales on the crown of its head; the massasauga has nine larger scales on the crown. Copperheads lack the rattle, but will vibrate their tail when annoyed. In dry leaves, this vibration can sound like a rattle; many other species, such as milk and rat snakes, will also perform this behavior. The copperhead can be told by its coppery-red head and by the distinct bands along its body which are widest at the sides and narrowest across the back.

Venomous snakes are best left alone. None of our species are particularly aggressive animals, but they will attempt to bite when handled.




and what of the other the 296 species of spiders in NY?
ref: research.amnh.org/entomology/blackrock2/check_list.htm


Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:34:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:36:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 3:39:23 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:38:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:

Originally Posted By twonami:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
www.pipelinenews.org/readerimages/hillary%20time.jpg

I NY


FU



You support the Empire State sending her to DC? (one step closer to the White House)


huh? it meant Fuck U that ain't funny
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:40:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:43:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By Merrell:

Originally Posted By twonami:

Originally Posted By Merrell:
www.pipelinenews.org/readerimages/hillary%20time.jpg

I NY


FU



You support the Empire State sending her to DC? (one step closer to the White House)



The day I can drive through PA without some part of 81 being down to one lane you can talk! What do they do, spend all summer fixing the road with chocolate pudding or something!?!? The highway is wrecked all winter and closed all summer!



I agree! As reprehensible and scummy New York is for putting the Hildebeast in office, the roads in PA (ALWAYS voted worst in the country by trucker magazines) and slimebag politicians (Fast Eddie & the gun grabbers, playing at a courthouse near you) render it equally odious.

Were it not for Jersey, Maryland and Ohio* teaming up to make PA look like a paradise in comparison, it would be hellhole surpassed only by Massachusetts & Kommiefornia.

*"On fire since 1969"

Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:47:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 3:47:56 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 3:59:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
NV and AZ, great gun states and no natural disasters. Yet.



Too hot, no seasons. X-mas with no snow on evergreen trees?-->
+ scorpians, snakes, spiders!



Area 51 = alien nooky
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:11:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 4:15:06 PM EDT by rkbar15]

Originally Posted By Aimless:

Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
NV and AZ, great gun states and no natural disasters. Yet.



Too hot, no seasons. X-mas with no snow on evergreen trees?-->
+ scorpians, snakes, spiders!



Not true. Northern AZ has snow and trees and other cool stuff.

Flagstaff AZ


www.arizonasnowbowl.com/interior/winteractivities/winteractivities.html

It's on my lsit of escape to states.
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 4:34:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 4:34:48 PM EDT by pickupdan]
NY sucks....

Served 43 years....

Was taxed out a home that my wife and I hand built...
Still getting love notes from Albany saying I owe more income tax...
Payed on average .25 cents more a gallon for gas.... Not sure what the differnce is today... 2.79 this evening here in VT
Not able to legally carry....
Stupid AWB
If they only gave NYC to NJ....

I love it here in VT..... You can have NY...

Link Posted: 9/2/2005 5:26:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 5:38:32 AM EDT
I've got bad news for you. If a catastrophe of the NO magnitude hit NYC it would be NO x1,000! There is probably a tsunami with NYC's name on it somewhere down the road.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 5:38:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By valblade:
I didn't say N.Y was the best. I just said I'm not so bad off here as I thought.
Ice storm=big deal. I didn't even lose power in rochester.



What happens when the power DOES go out, city boy?
What then?
And trust me - the power will go out.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 5:41:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:05:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:

I bet there are scorpians under that snow!



No doubt. That's what GF's are for. You send them out as scouts. If they start screaming and jumping up and down just go in the other direction. Keep in mind this will only work with a GF and not a wife.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:15:32 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:24:07 AM EDT
I love NY-except for the liberal cockroaches that have fatally infested our political system. A little snow bothers me not at all.


Politically, NY is doomed. Too many fester with the entitlement mindset. Just a matter of time.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:26:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:43:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GC456:
Good! Stay there!

I would rather deal with the blackwidows than more yankees.




It's like I say every year when people start to grumble about the heat in Phoenix:


"If it weren't for the heat, the damn snowbirds would never leave."
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 11:29:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GC456:
Good! Stay there!

I would rather deal with the blackwidows than more yankees.



Stop your gubmint and real estate developers from begging the yankees to move there. I think they like yankee money.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 1:32:16 PM EDT
Eventually a Cat 5 is bound to hit NJ, NYC or Long Island.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 2:59:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2005 3:58:07 PM EDT by GunnyG]

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
Eventually a Cat 5 is bound to hit NJ, NYC or Long Island.




History of The Perfect Storm (from www.perfectstorm.org/storms.cfm which is a synopsis of www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/satellite/satelliteseye/cyclones/pfctstorm91/pfctstorm.html:

Late October and November are months with weather in rapid transition in the eastern U.S. To the west, large fresh cold air masses from Canada begin to envelope the Midwest on a regular basis. To the east, the Atlantic Ocean is slower to lose its stored summer heat than the continent, and hurricanes sometimes form over the warm waters. The contrast between two very dissimilar air masses often results in massive storms just offshore of North America. These tempests, called "Nor'easters" in the Atlantic states, have sunk many ocean vessels, and this storm lived up to the reputation of being severe.

On October 28, 1991, a extratropical cyclone developed along a cold front which had moved off the Northeast coast of the U.S.

By 1800 UTC, this low was located a few hundred miles east of the coast of Nova Scotia. With strong upper air support, the low rapidly deepened and became the dominant weather feature in the Western Atlantic. Hurricane Grace, which had formed on October 27 from a pre-existing subtropical storm and was initially moving northwestward, made a hairpin turn to the east in response to the strong, westerly deep-layer mean flow on the southern flank of the developing extratropical low. Grace was a large system and it was already generating large swells ranging in size from about 15 feet offshore of North Carolina to about 10 feet near the Florida coastline.

As the low pressure continued to deepen on October 29, Grace became only a secondary contributor to the phenomenal sea conditions which developed over the Western Atlantic during the next few days. At 1800 UTC on the 29th, the vigorous cold front from the extratropical low undercut and quickly destroyed Grace's low level circulation east of Bermuda. The remnant mid- and upper-level moisture from Grace became caught up in the outer part of the extratropical storm center's circulation, far from the storm's center. By the next day these remnants had become indistinguishable. The center of the extratropical low drifted southeastward and then southwestward, deepening all the time. It reached peak intensity of 972 mb and maximum sustained winds of 60 knots at 1200 UTC on October 30, when it was located about 340 n mi south of Halifax, Nova Scotia (See Event Discussion image above). After reaching peak intensity on October 30, the low retrograded southwestward on October 31, and then southward as the central pressure rose to about 998 mb by 0000 UTC on November 1.

65 Knot Winds/ 39 Foot Wave Heights
During the early phase of the storm's history, a strong high pressure center extended from the Gulf of Mexico northeastward along the Appalachians into Greenland. Strong winds were generated from the tight pressure gradient between a strong high pressure center in eastern Canada (1043 mb) and the surface low. Phenomenal seas and strong winds and waves along the eastern U.S. coastline occurred at this time. Several vessels passed close to the extratropical storm center on October 30 and reported winds of 50-60 knots. NOAA buoy 44011 located at 41.1 degrees N, 66.6 degrees W reported maximum sustained winds of 49 kt with gusts to 65 kt and a significant wave height of 39 feet near 1500 UTC. Buoy 44008 located at 40.5 degrees N, 69.5 degrees W reported maximum sustained winds of 53 kt with gusts to 63kt and a significant wave height of 31 feet near 0000 UTC on October 31. Other unsubstantiated observations reported winds and waves considerably higher.

North Carolina's coast was lashed with occasional winds of 35 to 45 mph for five consecutive days. In New England on October 30-31, wind gusts of above hurricane force pounded the Massachusetts coastline. Representative peak gusts included: 78 mph at Chatham NWS, 74 mph at Thatcher Island, 68 mph at Marblehead, 64 mph at Blue Hill Observatory (all in Massachusetts) and 63 mph at Newport, RI. Even more damaging were the heavy surf and coastal flooding caused by the tremendous seas and high tides caused by the long overwater fetch length and duration of the storm. Waves 10 to 30 feet high were common from North Carolina to Nova Scotia. High tides pushed to from three to seven feet above normal. In New Jersey, the greatest tidal departures of winter storms of record occurred during this event, with tide heights exceeded only by the Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944.

In Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, the highest water levels were comparable to those of the nor'easter of March, 1962. A record high tide of 7.8 feet occurred at Ocean City, MD on the 30th, which eclipsed the old record of 7.5 feet recorded during the March 1962 storm. In Massachusetts, 25-foot waves reached the shoreline atop high tides already 4 feet above normal. At Boston, the tide reached 14.1 feet above mean low water or about 1 foot less than the tides associated with the "Blizzard of 1978." Elsewhere treacherous swells, surf, and associated coastal flooding occurred along portions of the Atlantic shoreline extending from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, to the Bahamas, along the U.S. and Canada and in Bermuda.

Widespread Extensive Damage
A state by state damage summary reveals the widespread and extensive damage caused by the storm and accompanying seas.

Beach erosion and coastal flooding was severe and widespread, even causing damage to lighthouses. Hundreds of homes and businesses were either knocked from their foundations or simply disappeared. Sea walls, boardwalks, bulkheads, and piers were reduced to rubble over a wide area. Numerous small boats were sunk at their berths and thousands of lobster traps were destroyed. Flooding was extensive invading homes and closing roads and airports. Former President Bush's home in Kennebunkport, ME suffered damage as windows were blown out, water flooded the building, and some structural damage also occurred. Even inland areas suffered major damage. The Hudson, Hackensack, and Passaic Rivers all experienced tidal flooding, and high winds brought down utility poles, lines, tree limbs, and signs in several states.

The most extensive damage occurred in New England where federal disaster areas were declared for seven counties in Massachusetts, five in Maine, and one in New Hampshire. Off Staten Island, two men were drowned when their boat capsized. Other fatalities occurred when a man fishing from a bridge was either blown or swept off in New York and a fisherman was swept off the rocks at Narrangansett, RI by heavy surf. Offshore, six lives were lost when the Andrea Gail, a swordfishing boat, sank. Total damage in the Halloween Storm, as it came to be known because of its date, was in the hundreds of millions ofdollars.

Bizarre End to the Halloween Storm
The southward motion of the cyclone on October 31 had brought the storm over a section of the Gulfstream with sea surface temperatures near 26 degrees C (80 degrees F). Convection began increasing in bands near the center and it is estimated that subtropical characteristics were acquired at 1800 UTC on October 31, setting the stage for a bizarre ending to this storm

By 0600 UT on November 1, central convection had increased to the point where a tropical cyclone (estimated to be of tropical storm intensity) could be identified within the central area of the low . Later it became a true hurricane in every sense of the word. Images of the hurricane phase and a discussion as to why this storm will be remembered in history as the "Unnamed Hurricane" can be found in the Hurricane Gallery of the Satellite's Eye Art Gallery.


Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:17:17 PM EDT
Please, please, please, since you are so happy,get your countrymen to GO BACK to N.Y...they have ruined Florida!!!!! Snakes, hurricans, looters, are preferable to "we didn't do it that way back "nawth".
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:33:21 PM EDT
im not sure the water temp gets warm enuff here on LI for a hurricane to strengthen to a Cat 5
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 6:34:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wolfpack:
NV and AZ, great gun states and no natural disasters. Yet.



Except being on their way to becoming Northern Mexico.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 8:37:36 PM EDT
Gloat now, and hope the ROP does not score again........................................................
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 8:41:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
Eventually a Cat 5 is bound to hit NJ, NYC or Long Island.




If so then LI is fucked. You think N.O. is bad, imagine that same situation in NYC.

Hardly anyone would be able to evacuate Long Island. Id have a better chance of getting off the Island by heading up north in my boat.
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 9:13:37 PM EDT
The word on the street is the NY City mayor said they could handle 25,000 hurricane victims and house them for at least 6 months. Just put them on planes and keep'em coming!
Link Posted: 9/2/2005 9:52:35 PM EDT
I think you all live in paradises compared to Colorado.

This place is the worst.

Why would anyone want to live here?

You would all be better off just to stay where you are.

No reason to move here that's for sure.

Nope, none at all.

Seydou

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