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Posted: 12/3/2007 6:05:28 AM EDT
Here's my workout that I do 3 times a week

10 min. on elliptical at about 155 strides per min.
10 min. on tread mill at 3.5 miles per hr
35 push-ups
30 lat pulls w/40 lbs
30 curls w/ 50 lbs

I'm reluctant to do crunches or sit-ups because I had a umbilical hernia operation a few yrs back.

I get really bored if I try to do more than the above,plus I have to use the city rec ctr fitness room because I can't afford a commercial gym. I'm 5'10" and 210 pounds w/ a 36" waist. Is this good for my age group? Do you always have to improve or can you maintain a preferred level???

Fitness gurus plse advise.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:07:54 AM EDT
At your age, if you are still above ground, breathing and ambulatory, you are ahead of the game.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:11:11 AM EDT
There was a guy (Kelly, I think his name was) who ran the Boston Marathon every year for decades. He died (I believe) recently, but was running it into his 80's.

So... You can be in as good of shape as you want to be.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:11:45 AM EDT
This is an OST to see what everyone says. I'll post my workout later.

FWIW I am 5'10" and 210-212 lbs.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:13:23 AM EDT
Here it is: Johnny Kelly

Johnny A. Kelley, a two-time winner of the Boston Marathon who finished a record 58 of the legendary races and was the "Runner of the Century" according to Runner's World magazine, died Wednesday night at a Cape Cod nursing home. He was 97.

"There are certain records in sports that leave you in awe," said David McGillivray, the Boston Marathon Race Director, in a statement. "In my opinion, nothing is more impressive than Johnny Kelley's 58 finishes in 61 starts of the Boston Marathon."

Kelley won the Boston Marathon in 1935 and 1945 and became the icon for the race, as well as distance running. He placed second in the marathon a record seven times and finished 18 times in the top 10. The Medford native also ran the marathon in the 1936 Berlin Olympics and the 1948 London Olympics.

"Johnny Kelley has long been the heart and soul of the Boston Marathon," said Thomas Grilk, president of the Boston Athletic Association, in a statement. "Now that he's gone, his heart and soul live on in the race that he, more than anyone else, has come to personify."

Kelley, a member of both the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame and the National Distance Running Hall of Fame, did not finish his first two Boston Marathons, dropping out in 1928 and 1932. He ran his fastest Boston Marathon in 1943, when he placed second and finished in two hours and 30 minutes. In 1992, at age 84, Kelley ran his 61st and final Boston Marathon in five hours and 58 minutes.

"Since the days of the Depression, one couldn't think of the Boston Marathon without thinking of Johnny," Grilk said in a statement. "That won't change."
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:14:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:
Here's my workout that I do 3 times a week

10 min. on elliptical at about 155 strides per min.
10 min. on tread mill at 3.5 miles per hr
35 push-ups
30 lat pulls w/40 lbs
30 curls w/ 50 lbs

I'm reluctant to do crunches or sit-ups because I had a umbilical hernia operation a few yrs back.

I get really bored if I try to do more than the above,plus I have to use the city rec ctr fitness room because I can't afford a commercial gym. I'm 5'10" and 210 pounds w/ a 36" waist. Is this good for my age group? Do you always have to improve or can you maintain a preferred level???

Fitness gurus plse advise.


You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:15:36 AM EDT
I would say you are doing just fine. As long as you get your heart rate up a few times each week, you will be good. stay active and eat realtively healthy and you should be alright
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:16:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Procyon:

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:
Here's my workout that I do 3 times a week

10 min. on elliptical at about 155 strides per min.
10 min. on tread mill at 3.5 miles per hr
35 push-ups
30 lat pulls w/40 lbs
30 curls w/ 50 lbs

I'm reluctant to do crunches or sit-ups because I had a umbilical hernia operation a few yrs back.

I get really bored if I try to do more than the above,plus I have to use the city rec ctr fitness room because I can't afford a commercial gym. I'm 5'10" and 210 pounds w/ a 36" waist. Is this good for my age group? Do you always have to improve or can you maintain a preferred level???

Fitness gurus plse advise.


You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.


I feel good, I just wanted to know if I'm in the zone for my age group
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:24:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.


I feel good, I just wanted to know if I'm in the zone for my age group


Well, again, check with your doctor. I know the BMI calculations suck, but with just 210lb & 5'10" for information, you're classified as obese as your BMI is 30.1 (over 30 is obese).
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:27:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Procyon:

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.


I feel good, I just wanted to know if I'm in the zone for my age group


Well, again, check with your doctor. I know the BMI calculations suck, but with just 210lb & 5'10" for information, you're classified as obese as your BMI is 30.1 (over 30 is obese).


Man that sucks...I don't have a pot belly or anything like that!!!!! What the hell is this BMI based on????
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:30:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.


I feel good, I just wanted to know if I'm in the zone for my age group


Well, again, check with your doctor. I know the BMI calculations suck, but with just 210lb & 5'10" for information, you're classified as obese as your BMI is 30.1 (over 30 is obese).


Man that sucks...I don't have a pot belly or anything like that!!!!! What the hell is this BMI based on????


Height & weight.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:32:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/3/2007 6:41:20 AM EDT by GOBLIN1]

Originally Posted By Procyon:

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

Originally Posted By Procyon:

You should check with your doctor first since you have a unique medical history with regards to the operation.

You can always improve, it's just a matter of how much you wish to alter your lifestyle to improve. I'd aim to lose 40 pounds if I were you, unless that is 210 pounds of good muscle. Maintenance is easy once you achieve a good amount of lean body mass.


I feel good, I just wanted to know if I'm in the zone for my age group


Well, again, check with your doctor. I know the BMI calculations suck, but with just 210lb & 5'10" for information, you're classified as obese as your BMI is 30.1 (over 30 is obese).


Man that sucks...I don't have a pot belly or anything like that!!!!! What the hell is this BMI based on????


Height & weight.


174 to be considered normal...thats ridiculous. Why isn't there an age variable????
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:40:04 AM EDT
BMI is bulshit, although if you're sedentary it can be a good benchmark. Body fat % tells all.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:40:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GOBLIN1:

So a drop of 10 lbs will do what to my index???


You will improve it.

nhlbisupport.com/bmi/
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:43:37 AM EDT
Personally...I believe BMI is for the birds.

I just turned 36 and play just about ever sport under the sun. Sand volleyball, flag football, softball, soccer, etc. I also train and run marathons, triathlons, 5k's and 10k's. It's really up to you as to just how fit you want to be.

Don't allow the hernia to hold you back either. See a doctor and seek medical counsel on to what extent you can push yourself.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:44:50 AM EDT
BMI does not take into account that you might be carrying a little extra muscle. I am in the obese category too. How many obese fuckers do you know that can climb a rope, or do 20 pullups?

BMI is for sedentary fuckers only.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:46:01 AM EDT
my teacher says there is a 60's class in the 24 hour races he runs
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:49:23 AM EDT
As long as you can get a hard-on on yur picker. You are fine.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:50:26 AM EDT
Drop a few pounds, this will help your joints.

Double or triple the cardio if you can.

Get a dog and walk it at night.

I just watched a 50-60yo pick his noise in public, so don't pick up bad habits.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:52:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
At your age, if you are still above ground, breathing and ambulatory, you are ahead of the game.

Dude, that's brutal. I'm almost 40 and I don't like you young whipper-snappers talking like that to your elders. :)
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 6:54:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/3/2007 6:56:16 AM EDT by TxRabbitBane]
Any activity is better than no activity. Are you fairly active in addition to this workout (i.e. do you walk around and do physical stuff)? I'd say for the average American in your age group you're probably above average, which is good. That being said, just based on the dimensions you gave, you might be better still if you lost a few pounds.

Before I stepped it up I'd check with my doctor, but in general (my knee jerk response, based on almost no knowlege of your personal situation) you could probably double your cardio if you had the inclination. Burning calories is a good thing. If it's available, you might also consider swimming, aqua-jogging, or water aerobics (they're very low impact and very good exercise). EDIT: I just read that budget is a concern, so perhaps this won't work (no matter, I think you can get by quite nicely with what you have available). I'm a big fan of core strengthening (abs, trunk), but given your medical history I'd check with a doctor (and perhaps a physical therapist) first to see what exercises might work for you. With respect to doctors, it's also a good idea to make sure you go to a doctor that is more athletic-oriented. It seems like a lot of doctors have the "if it has any possibility of hurting, don't do it" mentality, which is irritating.

As a runner, I see a lot of older guys (by that I mean 50+) who are in fantastic physical condition. That doesn't mean you have to bust out the running shoes and start training for the nearest marathon or anything (unless that's what you want to do), just an indication that you can probably be in as good shape as you're willing to work for.

The bottom line is, its all a question of what you want and what you're willing to do to get there. I think it's great that you take time to take care of yourself (lots of folks at any age do not). Whatever you decide, keep it up!
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 7:06:20 AM EDT
.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 7:35:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/3/2007 7:38:58 AM EDT by The_Macallan]
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 7:40:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FAC:

Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
At your age, if you are still above ground, breathing and ambulatory, you are ahead of the game.

Dude, that's brutal. I'm almost 40 and I don't like you young whipper-snappers talking like that to your elders. :)


I was born in 62
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 7:42:34 AM EDT
I'm going to be 59 in a few weeks, your workout looks good. One suggestion: you may try to put more time into cardio, I know its boring, invest in a MP3 player load it up from the rock music we listened to in the 60s & 70s - it helps! You gotta take care of your heart!
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 8:16:10 AM EDT
My dad is 58 and last summer he came along with my brother and I for a 5 day 60 mile hike in Glacier National Park. If you can carry 60 pounds or so of gear up and down mountains without dying, you're probably fine.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 8:21:27 AM EDT
Lotsa good advice already on this thread.

Only thing I would add: how is your heart rate during the elliptical and the treadmill?

I'd get my hands on a heart rate monitor and compare your rate (during exercise) to charts (readily available on the 'net ... they break it down by age group and whether you are in the aerobic or anaerobic zones). This way you can see how you're doing in terms of your cardio workout.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 10:09:26 AM EDT
What is your diet like? if you are not eating right then you are working against yourself.

More cardio.

Are you just doing one set of each exercise? If so, try to do more than one, decreasing reps each time. This will help increase endurance as well as improve your overall ability. Your body will plateau if you maintain a regular routine and don't [safely] push yourself. Also, vary your routine...this will help too.

I think for your age your are doing great, stick with it. +1 on consulting a doc.
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