Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/11/2007 4:20:11 PM EST
a few months ago, I spun my car around. I entered a corner too fast and it oversteered.

Anyways, no big deal. But what gets me is that the engine was killed like it had an accelerometer on it that killed the ignition when I spun it.

What caused this? Is there an accelerometer/kill switch?

'95 BMW M3
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:21:49 PM EST
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:23:13 PM EST
Automatic or Stick?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:23:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:
a few months ago, I spun my car around. I entered a corner too fast and it oversteered.

Anyways, no big deal. But what gets me is that the engine was killed like it had an accelerometer on it that killed the ignition when I spun it.

What caused this? Is there an accelerometer/kill switch?

'95 BMW M3


Insufficient fuel pressure to prevent fuel-supply interruption due to CF/inertia....

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:23:22 PM EST
Fuel pump could not exceed the force trying to push it back into the tank. You starved the engine of fuel.

Use to do it with carb cars a lot, the trick was to keep the spin slow enough.


SLOW DOWN!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:23:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By PinePig:
Automatic or Stick?


5 speed
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:24:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 4:25:13 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]
My guess is the drive tires sudden change of direction probably tried to spin the engine the opposite direction... thus stalling it. Usually it has nothing to do with fuel.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:24:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?


FTW!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:25:08 PM EST
it's because the conveyer belt matched the speed of the wheels in the opposite direction, thereby causing the engine to stall.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:25:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
My guess is the drive tires sudden change of direction probably tried to spin the engine the opposite direction... thus stalling it. Usually it has nothing to do with fuel.


it was in the wet...and uphill. That scenario doesn't fit.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:25:52 PM EST
I guess this is a good reason why I shouldn't attempt this myself.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:26:27 PM EST
it has nothing to do with gas, or anything like it

its a matter of that at one point the car was going backwards with the car in a forward gear, ie the engine tried to turn the wrong way, great way to permenantly kill an engine, ask any racer
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:26:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By killswitch1982:

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?


FTW!


alright. So maybe a stronger electronic fuel pump would fix it?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:27:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 4:27:50 PM EST by Backstop]
Maybe you activated - or shut off - that emergency fuel valve deal.

Guess it shuts off the fuel to the motor in case of an MVA.

EDIT:

Then again, maybe not.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:27:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By killswitch1982:

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?


FTW!


ANd FTW is?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:30:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
My guess is the drive tires sudden change of direction probably tried to spin the engine the opposite direction... thus stalling it. Usually it has nothing to do with fuel.


it was in the wet...and uphill. That scenario doesn't fit.


Whether it "fits" or not... a sudden change in wheel speed while the trans is coupled to the engine WILL stall the motor. Doesn't matter what direction you are going... All you gotta do is stab the brakes, loop the car around or yank the E-brake. All will result in a stalled engine... unless you can dip the clutch before it happens. (Not likely)
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:31:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:

Originally Posted By killswitch1982:

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?


FTW!


ANd FTW is?


FTW=For the win.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:32:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 4:36:31 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By killswitch1982:

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?


FTW!


alright. So maybe a stronger electronic fuel pump would fix it?


It has nothing to do with fuel.
Trust me.

The reason some are saying "fuel" is because they remember when carbureted motors would shut off this way... It WAS a fuel issue then, because the sudden change of direction would slosh fuel in the float bowl and uncover the jets... or slosh the fuel into bowl vent tubes, thus flooding the engine.

Your Bimmer is fuel injected right ? You have enough fuel pressure for a 2g starting line launch on the dragstrip... something you will NEVER duplicated on the street unless you spin into a wall backwards.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:35:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
My guess is the drive tires sudden change of direction probably tried to spin the engine the opposite direction... thus stalling it. Usually it has nothing to do with fuel.


it was in the wet...and uphill. That scenario doesn't fit.


Whether it "fits" or not... a sudden change in wheel speed while the trans is coupled to the engine WILL stall the motor. Doesn't matter what direction you are going... All you gotta do is stab the brakes, loop the car around or yank the E-brake. All will result in a stalled engine... unless you can dip the clutch before it happens. (Not likely)


roger that. I remember that my clutch foot was on the floor and the engine was off. I restarted it and it was all ok.

I did dip the clutch, but maybe not enough or in time.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:36:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:

I did dip the clutch, but maybe not enough or in time.



Bingo.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:38:54 PM EST
I disagree, we use to do it all the time on wet grass in fields. The spinning friction of the tire is dramatically reduced so the change in direction does not keep the tires from spinning in a forward direction. It has to do with how fast the back end of the car whips around and how much fuel the engine is consuming. As the engine revs, while the fuel is slowed or stopped the engine starves and stalls.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:40:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
I disagree, we use to do it all the time on wet grass in fields. The spinning friction of the tire is dramatically reduced so the change in direction does not keep the tires from spinning in a forward direction. It has to do with how fast the back end of the car whips around and how much fuel the engine is consuming. As the engine revs, while the fuel is slowed or stopped the engine starves and stalls.


Read my reply a few posts up about carburetors.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:47:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By Saginaw79:
Centrifical(sp) force pushing the fuel back down the line?



"If I see 'centrifugal force' on your free body diagram you will receive a failing grade on this test"
- Dr. Wickert, Dynamics of Physical Systems, Spring Semester 1994.


Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
My guess is the drive tires sudden change of direction probably tried to spin the engine the opposite direction... thus stalling it. Usually it has nothing to do with fuel.


That is why it stalled. At one point in time, just long enough, the tires were at zero velocity with the clutch still engaged.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:48:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
I disagree, we use to do it all the time on wet grass in fields. The spinning friction of the tire is dramatically reduced so the change in direction does not keep the tires from spinning in a forward direction. It has to do with how fast the back end of the car whips around and how much fuel the engine is consuming. As the engine revs, while the fuel is slowed or stopped the engine starves and stalls.


Read my reply a few posts up about carburetors.


So how do you explain it with a fuel injected truck on wet grass?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:54:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
I disagree, we use to do it all the time on wet grass in fields. The spinning friction of the tire is dramatically reduced so the change in direction does not keep the tires from spinning in a forward direction. It has to do with how fast the back end of the car whips around and how much fuel the engine is consuming. As the engine revs, while the fuel is slowed or stopped the engine starves and stalls.


Read my reply a few posts up about carburetors.


So how do you explain it with a fuel injected truck on wet grass?


Magic.



FWIW, I know the plane will take off.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:55:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By gaspain:

I did dip the clutch, but maybe not enough or in time.



Bingo.


Absolufrigginlutely. The fuel PSI in an injected engine will not be affected by a simple spinout... Listen to the Dragracer, & stay in the throttle!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:58:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:00:08 PM EST
So can someone tell me why when a cop PITs a suspect vehicle, it kills the engine?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:04:49 PM EST
Fuel cut off switch?

Most newer cars have an automatic fuel cut off. So, when you crash you won't also burn. if its a Ford look behind the carpet on the wall of the trunk. Mash the button and Voila your car runs again.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 4:44:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL:
So how do you explain it with a fuel injected truck on wet grass?


High gear at slow travel speeds will make it REAL easy to stall a motor... So YES... even a fuel injected truck in wet grass.
Anything less than wet ice will have little trouble stalling a motor in a spin. Even with an automatic transmission.

Remember, the transmission selects gears based on driveshaft/wheel speed, not actual road speed.
If you are going forward at 60mph, you will likely be in a 1:1 gear like 3rd, or an OD 4th gear at .87:1 or so.
How much torque do you suppose is available at the wheels when you are in 3rd or 4th gear ? then try to overcome ZERO or negative road speed ?


I guess that makes sense.
Top Top