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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/19/2005 5:10:05 PM EDT
I am going my first "big game"(I have only done small game so this is kinda big for me) hunting in Montana in October. What do I need what should I take? Does any one know what an out of state license will cost me? Can I use my AR-15? What ammo? I have two of them, a 20" A2 and a persision style AR that weighs a ton (20lbs) which one should I use? The percision rifle will hold a 1.5" group at 200yrds with 75gr HP Black Hills blue box the A2 is just iron sights and I can hold about a 4" group at 100yrds. Havent done much experimation with ammo on the A2. Or should I borrow a .308 Lever action Savage from my grandfather? I need all the info I can get!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:16:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 6:01:10 PM EDT by THellURider]
You're in for a treat. You're going to need something you can shoot at distance with, and probably buck the wind. I went on my 1st Antelope hunt this past weekend.

Antelope are skittish animals so camo is a must. Getting close to them can be pretty tough. I don't know Montana hunting firearms laws, but you're Precision AR with the heaviest bullet you can find would probably be a good bet, although I would take something heavier. You need to know you're rifle well which is why I would not recomend the .308. Whatever you take, be sure you can shoot it as guides HATE dealing with clients that can't hit what they need to. Expect your shot to be over 200 yards, probably closer to 300 (depending on terrain). I think a .270 would be perfect for antelope.

Here's my thread about it.
ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=11&t=391066

ETA:

A good equipment list:

- Good set of binocs (to help you pick out "yours")
- A spotting scope (to aid your binocs in picking out "yours")
- Rangefinder would be good
- Knee pads can be nice for the crawls

IMO you should look for a dedicated hunting rifle but if you can't you can't. Look around the internet for pictures of Pronghorn to get an idea of what a "good" goat should look like. I don't know how big they get up where you are going, but anyting over 70"s is a pretty good goat. Antelope meat is vVERY tasty so if you can take it home with you. Also there's a book out there called "The Perfect Shot" which has cut aways of almsot all game animals so that you can get an idea of the physiology of Antelope.

ETA2: If they are in their rut then the goats will be more focused on the does than you. They will, in that case, let you get surprisingly close. Also, in that situation it will be the does that spook...and there are always more does than gots which means more eyes looking for you.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:42:43 PM EDT
Have fun walking, and plug your nose because they stink!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:44:47 PM EDT
I would reccomend lots of jerkey, unless you are a very good chef.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:51:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 5:56:04 PM EDT by lokt]
The A2 is NOT what you want to use, you will likely be shooting at around 200 yards if you can successfully complete a stalk.
If you use the precision rifle, consider the Winchester 64 gr ?Powerpoint? (the name of the 64 gr bullet escapes me), I've heard others have used them on deer with decent results.
Personally, I would borrow the .308 from your grandfather, assuming it is scoped. The wind in Montana and Wyoming is something else in the fall, at least it was during the times I was there for antelope, and the heavier bullet may prove beneficial.
--I used a Savage bolt gun in .243, harvesting one antelope at a little over 300 and the other at 186 yards.

Regardless, make sure you know where whatever you're taking impacts at out to about 250 yards. Generally, if you sight in 3" high at 100, you'll be on at 200, and around 8-10" low at 300 yards, as long as you aren't using something like a .30-30...

Antelope have a white patch on their belly/midway up their ribcage. Where this comes to a corner at the front shoulder is about where you want to aim on one that is standing broadside.

A mature buck antelope has horns that are twice as high as the ears. The horn measurement goes from the base of the horn at the skull all the way up the curve to the end of the horn. 13"+ is a great one.

Both male and female antelope have horns.

Take a good set of binoculars or a light spotting scope. It will help you identify a mature buck.

How we hunted:
We were on a 20,000 acre cattle ranch, with moderately accessible two-tracks all over the place. We'd stop the vehicle before the crest of a hill, and crawl to the crest and scope for antelope. You could often see close to a mile in any direction, but there were so many draws and cuts for them to bed in that you had your work cut out for you looking for antelope if the weather was shitty. That is, you'd have to go to several vantage points to thoroughly scope an area. On the other hand, if conditions are nice, you can often see the antelope's white belly/rump just out in the open, grazing in herds. Chances are, the larger the herd of does, the larger the buck will be that's with it.

Making the stalk:
Maneuver yourself around to the downwind side of the herd, and using the numerous cuts and draws (small gullies) that are typical for the area, work your way towards the general direction of the herd. Don't be surprised if they have moved a couple hundred yards out of range in the two hours it took you to get to the point where you had planned to shoot from. Instead, seek them out, backtrack if you have to in order to stay down wind, and continue the stalk. You may do everything perfectly and they still get spooked and run a couple miles...In that case, find another group of antelope.
You may find yourself having to low-crawl the last little bit of a stalk. Watch out for snakes and the small cacti that frequent the area. Ask my brother about the cactus spines in his knees...
One tip - don't poke your head over the top of a rock to shoot, try and maneuver your way to the side of it so you don't silhouette yourself against the sun.

Good luck.

Enjoy! It's a lot of fun!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:53:33 PM EDT
If Montana is like Wyoming and Colorado when I was driving around those states, simply drive around until you find one you like and step out of the car and shoot. They were everywhere and within easy distance to shoot. About like cows except smaller
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:58:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 5:59:48 PM EDT by lokt]

Originally Posted By alaman:
If Montana is like Wyoming and Colorado when I was driving around those states, simply drive around until you find one you like and step out of the car and shoot. They were everywhere and within easy distance to shoot. About like cows except smaller



This works, if they haven't been hunted. I haven't been that lucky. The larger bucks are skittish and this probably won't be a successful tactic if that's what he's going for...

If you are driving on the property and happen to see a group of them, continue on over the next little hill, stop the vehicle gently, get out, and start your stalk. Slamming on the brakes at first sight will scare them off...
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:00:52 PM EDT
If Montana is like Wyoming and Colorado when I was driving around those states, simply drive around until you find one you like and step out of the car and shoot. They were everywhere and within easy distance to shoot. About like cows except smaller

If it were that easy! You do drive around a lot, but you can forget about jumping out of your vehicle and shooting a stationary animal. These herds reach running speeds of 55 mph. You will want to shoot an animal that is resting between sprints. If you can't do that, be sure to lead them a long way as you are shooting at them.

Here is a strategy that has worked best for me in Idaho. Find a small herd of pronghorn (their true name). Get a buddy to drop you off with your gun just out of sight of the animals. Have your buddy drive slowly at a 90 degree angle to the animals. They will be watching the vehicle. As their attention is diverted, you are sneeking up on them to get a closer shot. Then, single out a 14 to 15-inch buck and blast away.

Good luck. It is some of the most exciting big game hunting in America.

Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:15:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 6:23:53 PM EDT by SRM]
When I was in MT, .223 was not legal for any big game. .24 cal minimum, but laws may have changed (ask on the hometown forum or google the online regs)

You will need a hunter safety card.

Antelope are essentially german shepherds on stilts size-wise.

They have incredible eyesight, about 7x or so.

They have good hearing.

They have the ability to top out at 60 mph in order to run away from the American Cheetah.

They are extremely curious.

If they start running, you are too late.

Let me know if you have any questions. My son will be after some in a couple of weeks.

SRM

Edit to add....it is antelope or pronghorn more correctly.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:08:06 PM EDT
<-------has done much antelope hunting.

What people has said is a pretty good idea of what your hunt will be like. Drive, spot, stalk, shoot.

Your shots could be even further than 200yds. Make sure you know the ballistics of your caliber. As to that; your AR is too small of a caliber; both here in WY and MT. In WY .243 is the smallest centerfire for big game, I believe that MT is the same, but check anyway.

Do yourself a favor and find a .270. It is the perfect caliber for goats. It can carry the distance and is very flat shooting. That said I shot many a goat with a 6mm Rem; very similar to the .243.

Now I use my .338win mag. I shot one once at about 25yds from my knees, as he was facing me. I hit him in the chest. The 250gr bullet went almost all the way through. He didn't go anywhere.

Antelope hunting is absoulte fun. My family loves to go with me. Do some serious study of antelope pictures. It is difficult to judge the size. Anything 14 to 15" is a nice buck that you should be proud of. If you are looking for something to make book, mass is the key. The 15" buck is pretty common to find, the mass is hard. Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:37:36 PM EDT
I'm from Wyoming and have "tipped over" an antelope or two in my day. It's a lot of fun if you don't turn it into something too serious. There are lots of them so enjoy the experience. Someone mentioned the minimum caliber was 243 Wyoming was the same. They are not very tenacious and don't have much will to live, they die easily so you don't have to hit them with a lot of power, they are quite small around 70lbs as allready mentioned. Flat and Fast cartridges are the cats meow, as ranges can be quite long if you go about it right. Take lots and lots of bullets. How many are you allowed? (Wyoming was five animals, hence the reccomendation for lots of bullets.)
Enjoy your trip.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 4:02:48 AM EDT
Thanks for the info! Anything else I need to know?
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:17:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 5:17:58 AM EDT by THellURider]

Originally Posted By tippman:
Thanks for the info! Anything else I need to know?



Well it sounds like you need to start practicing with that .308 as soon as possible, out to 300 yards, minimum, if possible. Know your gun.

Better yet, buy a .270 bolt gun if you can. A .270 will serve you well as a hunting rifle for the rest of your life. Not a bad investment. It can, conceivably, take any game in North America. (Although it wouldn't be my choice for bear or large Elk/moose)

Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:21:42 AM EDT
forget the ar15 use at least the .308 but i'd go with a .270 or 7mm magsomthing that shots flat and hits hard.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 5:29:46 AM EDT
I cant get a new gun at this point. So it looks like I need to go with the .308. It is scoped and I have shot it several times but I still need more practice. Ammo suggestions for it? Am I reading this right? The cost of the tag is 203$ but am I SOL in the fact that is says that the deadline is June 1st? Can I still get one? or will I have to wait till next year?

nonresident licenses
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:05:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tippman:
I cant get a new gun at this point. So it looks like I need to go with the .308. It is scoped and I have shot it several times but I still need more practice. Ammo suggestions for it? Am I reading this right? The cost of the tag is 203$ but am I SOL in the fact that is says that the deadline is June 1st? Can I still get one? or will I have to wait till next year?

nonresident licenses



If you reload try some lighter bullets with your .308. Your .308 will be plenty, and do fine, just know the ups out to 300 and don't take shots further than that!

I'm not too sure how the out of state license works, but I think you may be out of luck this year, unless you puchase one from a guide, which may be available, or not.

There are always additional doe/fawn tags, but I would wait for a buck tag/any antelope. I would guess there will be some kind of tags available througha guide service, but they will be pricy.

Maybe I live in the wrong county, but limits have always been one antelope per tag, and you are only allowed one tag per year, unless you buy additional doe/fawn tags.

Link Posted: 9/20/2005 6:48:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By guns762:

Originally Posted By tippman:
I cant get a new gun at this point. So it looks like I need to go with the .308. It is scoped and I have shot it several times but I still need more practice. Ammo suggestions for it? Am I reading this right? The cost of the tag is 203$ but am I SOL in the fact that is says that the deadline is June 1st? Can I still get one? or will I have to wait till next year?

nonresident licenses



If you reload try some lighter bullets with your .308. Your .308 will be plenty, and do fine, just know the ups out to 300 and don't take shots further than that!

I'm not too sure how the out of state license works, but I think you may be out of luck this year, unless you puchase one from a guide, which may be available, or not.

There are always additional doe/fawn tags, but I would wait for a buck tag/any antelope. I would guess there will be some kind of tags available througha guide service, but they will be pricy.

Maybe I live in the wrong county, but limits have always been one antelope per tag, and you are only allowed one tag per year, unless you buy additional doe/fawn tags.




Thanks for the info. Unfortunatly I do not reload. Any suggestions on over the counter ammo? I am going to call the parks and wild life to see about the tag.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:14:32 AM EDT
I have gotten several in Ida/Wyo/Mont and have done it with a .308 and under 250 yards everytime so it is just like hunting most big game take your time and be patient.

I have never went thru a guide so I dont know about there having tags or not but I always had to put in for a draw on the tags way before the season so I dont know if you can just go up there and get one.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:30:23 AM EDT
Another vote for .270. A .270 is considered to be THE gun for pronghorn around here. And ditto to what to do with the animal once you get it... jerky or sausage is about the only thing you can do with those animals.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:34:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 7:37:52 AM EDT by tippman]

Originally Posted By Red_Label:
Another vote for .270. A .270 is considered to be THE gun for pronghorn around here. And ditto to what to do with the animal once you get it... jerky or sausage is about the only thing you can do with those animals.



I would love to get a new gun but I have my wedding to pay for first. So my only choices are a 30-30 with irons, the 2 ARs or the .308.

Jerky is my plan!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:50:33 AM EDT
Definitely the .308 then. I'd use a very light bullet because an antelope is small and you'll want the flat trajectory. I have a Ruger M77 bolt .223 (in addition to my AR) and if the SHTF and I needed to hunt with it, I wouldn't hesitate to use it on these critters.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 7:58:51 AM EDT
Find an .308 OTC load with Nosler Ballistic tips or similar.

You dont need any bonded core stuff, just something with a pointy plastic tip (and hopefully a boattail base).

I think Winchester sells what you need.

Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:13:22 AM EDT
You might also check on MT requirement to wear Hunter Orange while hunting. Often people tend to shoot Ant. at much longer ranges than they can kill. Such a small animal can really pack the lead once they are poorly hit and they won't let you get close after that.

Their eyesight can't be believed. While following some here in OR, I saw a "spot" of white way out there. I put a 25 power spotting scope on it so I could just make it out clearly and it was an Ant. watching me. The temp. during the day on that hunt went over 100 every day.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:22:22 AM EDT
Tippman: Where in CO are you located? I am in the NE panhandle and have a 270WSM that I could loan you. I have had great success with this round hunting the same kind of land that you will experience on your hunt.

Good luck,
SBG
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 8:55:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 8:55:36 AM EDT by guns762]

Originally Posted By Red_Label:
And ditto to what to do with the animal once you get it... jerky or sausage is about the only thing you can do with those animals.



This guy knows what he's talking about. Antelope "steaks" are an "interesting" taste. BTW, if you don't jerk it yourself, it can be expensive (think around $125.00) to get it processed professionally.

Sausage is fantastic, Jerky....even better. I love antelope jerky.

Ditto on the hunter's orange! Don't worry to much about it, the antelope tend to be curious about the color and will actually walk towards it if they don't see all of you.

You might think about bringing knee pads and elbow pads for crawling. Some crawls can go for hundreds of yards. It is a lot of work. It is better than having cactus in your knees and elbows.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 10:56:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Label:
Another vote for .270. A .270 is considered to be THE gun for pronghorn around here. And ditto to what to do with the animal once you get it... jerky or sausage is about the only thing you can do with those animals.



Antelope can be fine eating if they haven't been running, you make a clean kill and you cool and skin them ASAP. As soon as you remove the entrails, put a couple of bags of ice in the body cavity. Skin and process it within 24 hours of the kill. They are small and easy to process, even in camp. Keep the meat clean. Remember heat dirt and moisture are the enemies.

SRM
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:25:52 AM EDT
Sounds like everything was covered for you. If you can't buy a tag and have to go through and outfitter, my suggestion would be to wait another year and buy your bolt gun and get a general season tag.

Also, one thing that I did not see mentioned....All goat bucks have a black cheek patch...even as fawns.

If you are just looking for a good buck, remember that thier ears are roughly 7" in length. If you want to shoot for the book, look for mass and good diggers.

+1 on anything but your 30-30 and your AR15's. I'm sure they would do the job, but you need a flat shooting, wind bucking round for the goats.

Oh one more thing to add, depending how late in the Month of October your hunt is...be carefull dragging one out by the horns, you might get a surprise.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:26:01 AM EDT
I grew up in Montana and moved a couple of years ago. I hunt there now by paying out of state fees. The tag for antelope cost $200.00 for out of state licence. The only problem for you, it sounds like is that it's a drawing issued tag so your a little late. unless you can find an over the counter tag in a few areas that are probably already sold out. As far as Caliber to use I have used .223, 220 Swift, 22-250, 6mm, .243, 7MM Rem Mag, .30-06 and .300WSM. The .22 cals all work very well on Antelope it all comes down to shot placement and judement. You have to remember your hunting in open country if you get a good hit and he runs 400yds it's okay you can watch him all the way. You dont have to knock him ass over tea kettle with a huge caliber these are small animals. This is just my opinion but I've always had good results W/the 22 Cals. As far as caliber restrictions in Montana there are none it says on page 13 of the 2005 Regulations "There are no Caliber limitation during the general season for the taking of big game animals" There are also no Magazine capacity limits on firearms for any game animal. Only Waterfowl and That limit is 3. Hope this helps out a little.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 11:58:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 12:16:37 PM EDT by guns762]
Thought I'd wet your apatite a little. I shot this buck back in 99. He has good length but small cutters so he only scores, I think 78, or maybe a little more. The horns are 15" in length, good length but small cutters and not very big bases.

I shot one a few years earlier that scores 83 1/8=book +. He only has 13" horns, that are broomed off, but 9" bases and cutters that are ridiculous in length. He has major mass, so he scores well.


I forgot to add: This was a dissapointment/failure because I wanted to shoot him with my Ruger Vaquero. I never got close enough and after numerous failed stalks, I popped him with the .270 at about 200yds. I had closed to him to with in 75yds several times, only to have him run off before I could get close enough to get the shot. My set limit for the Vaquero was 50yds.


Link Posted: 9/20/2005 12:01:13 PM EDT
One additional piece of advice from my last antelope...it's all about the stalk. Having hunted 30 years, I thought I knew a few things about field work. Wrong! These creatures can see you a mile away. If you're in your car, they'll continue grazing. Get out, and they start moving.

Have fun.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 12:21:31 PM EDT
take a 22 conversion for your ar or plenty of cheap 223 for prarie dogs jackrabbits and coyotes I go to wyoming every other year and have fun shooting them also-meat tastes like veal to me and is my favorite game meat.I use a ar10 rifle
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 12:52:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 1:02:11 PM EDT by tippman]

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill24-7:
I grew up in Montana and moved a couple of years ago. I hunt there now by paying out of state fees. The tag for antelope cost $200.00 for out of state licence. The only problem for you, it sounds like is that it's a drawing issued tag so your a little late. unless you can find an over the counter tag in a few areas that are probably already sold out. As far as Caliber to use I have used .223, 220 Swift, 22-250, 6mm, .243, 7MM Rem Mag, .30-06 and .300WSM. The .22 cals all work very well on Antelope it all comes down to shot placement and judement. You have to remember your hunting in open country if you get a good hit and he runs 400yds it's okay you can watch him all the way. You dont have to knock him ass over tea kettle with a huge caliber these are small animals. This is just my opinion but I've always had good results W/the 22 Cals. As far as caliber restrictions in Montana there are none it says on page 13 of the 2005 Regulations "There are no Caliber limitation during the general season for the taking of big game animals" There are also no Magazine capacity limits on firearms for any game animal. Only Waterfowl and That limit is 3. Hope this helps out a little.



I called the Fish and wildlife or whatever they are called and I am out of luck on the drawing. I had to have it in before March 15 so the lady said. Can any one explain how the over the counter tag works? s that something where I just walk into the local sporting goods store and get it if it is available? What would a new rifle run me aprox.?

Sorry for being a pain in the ass about this but this is the first time I have done anything like this. None of my close or not so close family or friends ever did any big game hunting so I am a supreme noob at this. I would or might be going with my fiancé father and his friend who lives there and they are not sure of the out of state stuff either due to they have lived there all their lives. Once again thanks for all the info.
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:41:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tippman:
What would a new rifle run me aprox.?




Tipp, don't worry about your rifle. The .308 is fine. I don't have the picture scanned, but I have a picture of a nice 14" goat that I shot with my Enfield No. 1 MkIII2A in .308. No scope; just irons. I shot him at about 50yd at a dead run.

Save your money for something else. The .308 is just fine and put the antelope down quickly. It will be fairly easy to get to within 200yds of a nice buck. Just have a good rest and take a good shot.

If you insist on a new rifle a .270 or 7mm Rem mag is a perfect all around gun for North America. I've taken elk, deer, antelope with both. I would look for a good used Remington 700 classic, bld, or adl. Most people want something new and exciting, so those calibers shouldn't demand a premium, I'm guessing around 300-350 for the rifle. Pawn shops are your friend!
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 1:46:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/20/2005 1:49:03 PM EDT by petagunner]

Originally Posted By tippman:

I called the Fish and wildlife or whatever they are called and I am out of luck on the drawing. I had to have it in before March 15 so the lady said. Can any one explain how the over the counter tag works? s that something where I just walk into the local sporting goods store and get it if it is available? What would a new rifle run me aprox.?

Sorry for being a pain in the ass about this but this is the first time I have done anything like this. None of my close or not so close family or friends ever did any big game hunting so I am a supreme noob at this. I would or might be going with my fiancé father and his friend who lives there and they are not sure of the out of state stuff either due to they have lived there all their lives. Once again thanks for all the info.



First off, no aplogy needed. The fact that you havn't gotten any negative replies yet is a miracle and this is what this site is here for, right?
I'd ask your future FIL and see what or where he recommends for your over the counter tag. If he has an in with someone he might even be able to get you a LOP tag (depends on regs up there)
You should be able to pick up a new Rem 700ADL in a 270 or Savage 110 in the 350-370 range if you look. Scope, well that depends on what you want to spend. I'd suggest just a 3x9 leupy and that will run ya 200. Bases and rings another 40 or 50. Just figure on 700 by the time you go rifle,scope,base and rings,sling and ammo.
Good luck!
Hope you can go, its addictive. Those goats can be so damn smart its frustrating, but then they can do the dumbest shit too.......like walk miles to a spot just to crawl under the fence.....

They are fun to hunt...unfortunatley here in OR I've been waiting 11 years for my tag.......
Link Posted: 9/20/2005 2:22:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tippman:

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill24-7:
I grew up in Montana and moved a couple of years ago. I hunt there now by paying out of state fees. The tag for antelope cost $200.00 for out of state licence. The only problem for you, it sounds like is that it's a drawing issued tag so your a little late. unless you can find an over the counter tag in a few areas that are probably already sold out. As far as Caliber to use I have used .223, 220 Swift, 22-250, 6mm, .243, 7MM Rem Mag, .30-06 and .300WSM. The .22 cals all work very well on Antelope it all comes down to shot placement and judement. You have to remember your hunting in open country if you get a good hit and he runs 400yds it's okay you can watch him all the way. You dont have to knock him ass over tea kettle with a huge caliber these are small animals. This is just my opinion but I've always had good results W/the 22 Cals. As far as caliber restrictions in Montana there are none it says on page 13 of the 2005 Regulations "There are no Caliber limitation during the general season for the taking of big game animals" There are also no Magazine capacity limits on firearms for any game animal. Only Waterfowl and That limit is 3. Hope this helps out a little.



I called the Fish and wildlife or whatever they are called and I am out of luck on the drawing. I had to have it in before March 15 so the lady said. Can any one explain how the over the counter tag works? s that something where I just walk into the local sporting goods store and get it if it is available? What would a new rifle run me aprox.?

Sorry for being a pain in the ass about this but this is the first time I have done anything like this. None of my close or not so close family or friends ever did any big game hunting so I am a supreme noob at this. I would or might be going with my fiancé father and his friend who lives there and they are not sure of the out of state stuff either due to they have lived there all their lives. Once again thanks for all the info.



What you need to do is call the Helena office FWP and see if there are any surlus tags for sale for antelope. The only other way you could do it is go to the Montana fish wildlife and parks site and put your name on the excess tag list you can do it online.- if they have one for antelope. This is an application for tags that people have asked for a refund on I.E. Death, Illness Etc. Otherwise your only option is going with an outfitter $$$$
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