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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/14/2005 2:18:59 PM EDT
I know that it's primitive & probably 19th or early 20th century, but I'm not sure what you'd call it. Is it a bean cupboard/ cabinet or some type of dry sink or vanity? Also, any thoughts on the wood used. Looks like pine for the doors & base, but the top appears to be a hardwood.

Any antique people out there care to take a guess?





Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:20:32 PM EDT
are those Ming vases'?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:21:51 PM EDT
looks like a new production "rustic" furniture piece.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:21:59 PM EDT
It appears to just be a home made cabinet. No value I'm guessing.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:24:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:28:04 PM EDT
Not reproduction, I'm sure of it. You would not believe the build of dust, gook, etc. when I got it. Also there are permanent rings on the shelf inside, that, coincidentally, match the size of the bottom of a Mason jar.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:31:00 PM EDT
Is that top made of plywood?

It appears to be rather poorly made.

Remember, there's a fine line between being an antique and being a really old piece of crap...

~Dan
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:35:13 PM EDT
Antiques = old furniture someone else didn't want.

G
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:35:45 PM EDT
yup, top looks of plywood. look at the layers on that thing.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 2:42:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 2:44:20 PM EDT by Dawg180]
If I was to hazard a guess it is probably a homebuilt piece of furniture from a farm.

The boards on the door appear to be pine and about 12" wide or so(?) and the construction method certainly doesn't suggest someone who was a cabintermaker by any means. Even a neophyte cabinemaker would have framed out the door and then had an inset panel- to call the doors primitive would be an understatement. it looks like someone looked at a fence or barn door and roughly copied it. In fact, my guess is that it was built of salvaged wood from a barn or similar strucutre- did you find any animal hair, hay, or other similar stuff wedged into the rough grain? Check on the underside boards and places where it would have survived a bit of cleaning and that ought to give you an indication.

Some other intersting details are the angle baces under the projecting top- you can see how they don't really do anything structurally, but are more aesthtic in purpose. Of course, if someone had an apple peeler a canning press on the top I bter you wouldn't want the front lip breaking off! Another interesting detail is how the center stile between the doors is notched into the stile underneath the top. You will also note how the doors project lower thatn the center style. A bit goofy, but gives it that rustic look that probably caught your eye in the first place, eh?

The catches are a very common type from around the turn of the century- I grew up in an old farmhouse and they are the very same type that was on all the cupboards in the basement (which had originally been the kitchen cupboards before my dad remodeled the house). The hinges are probably of the same age.


I wouldn't think it would have any real "marketable" value as in being historically signifcant, i.e. you won't be gettig milliions on the Antique Road Show. Where did you get it?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 3:01:42 PM EDT
The top indeed appears to be oak. Since it's a double door, I don't think it holds a chamber pot. It would be a lot fancier if it did. Primitive construction (bent over nails, simple plank construction with no dovetails) suggests that it was made on a farm and not commerically made (or made as cheaply as possible). Nails heads are round and not rectangular along with the generous use of nails in lieu of dovetail construction suggest it was late 19th century or early 20th century.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 3:08:12 PM EDT
Wow Dawg180,

Thanks for the infromative response. I bought it a few years ago from an antiques dealer in central North Carolina. I think I paid $50.00. I realized that it is very rough & primitive, but that's the style that I like . I use it as an accent piece in my family room. It contrasts nicely with the modern furniture in the room.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 3:08:47 PM EDT
Firewood.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 3:14:37 PM EDT
I don't think that's gonna be another one of those $450,000 Antiques Roadshow discoveries...
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 8:32:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By snailfan:
Wow Dawg180,

Thanks for the infromative response. I bought it a few years ago from an antiques dealer in central North Carolina. I think I paid $50.00. I realized that it is very rough & primitive, but that's the style that I like . I use it as an accent piece in my family room. It contrasts nicely with the modern furniture in the room.



No problem. I figured that for once someone on AR15 should post something useful and informative instead of just posting snide remarks.

$50 is a good deal- Cheaper than IKEA crap and probably sturdier than the fiber board laminate stuff you would get at Target for the same price. Not to metnion it is worth the price just to have an interesting conversation piece. IMHO you did good.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 1:59:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glock23carry:
Antiques = old furniture someone else didn't want.

G




Man are you way off. I collect antiques.
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