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Posted: 4/16/2017 7:08:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:09:51 PM EDT
Mohu, check on Amazon
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:11:26 PM EDT
How far are you from the towers?  Are they in one general direction or all around you?

I have a Winegard, and it works very well.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:12:20 PM EDT
I have a clearstream antenna on the roof. I mounted it to the direct tv mast and used the coax that was already in place. Seemed to fit fine from what I remember.

I live in a pretty windy area and it's been fine.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:12:49 PM EDT
Ham (amateur) radio books have some surprisingly good designs. Easy to fabricate and very inexpensive. You may be surprised.

cap
KB1IIX
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:12:51 PM EDT


Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:16:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:19:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:19:44 PM EDT
Mohu Antenna works for me, cut the cord in 2014
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:32:31 PM EDT
TVfool.com will let you determine how many channels are tunable in your location.  If you have stations scattered around the compass from your location you might consider a multiple bay antenna system instead of directional antenna with a rotor.

You can find HDTY antenna mounts that let you install 4 flat plant antennas to get 360 degree directional coverage.  I was working with a nephew to find one he can use at his house in NC.

The mount was relatively cheap and for the price of 4 antennas and the mount he could get 51 channels cheaper than with a directional antenna and rotor.  Plus he had a system that allowed all the TV sets in his house to tune different stations at the same time, unlike what a rotor-mounted antenna provides.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 7:51:19 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
This.

Plus .......... there ain't no setch thang as an "HD Antenna".

Don't fall for that bullshit.

A UHF antenna is a UHF antenna, and the one you build will work just as well as the commercial one as long as you follow the directions and weatherproof all connections.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:05:51 PM EDT
You can try to build one. These are two I have used.


Cheap $7 antenna.

Amazon Product
  • Receive free digital broadcast High Definition TV signals.
  • 25 Miles Range
  • Super Thin design allows you to place it almost anywhere and no power required

$70, I snagged it for $35 and it got an amazing amount of channels in my office at work.

[

Amazon Product
  • New Concept Design: Modern and upgraded outdoor antenna, the compact size reduces wind load, providing much better signal reliability on windy or rainy days. Anti-UV coating and waterproof/snowproof design allow shielding for minimum interference
  • 360 Degree Omni-directional Reception: Receive signal from all directions, no need the remote control as traditional huge outdoor antennas required to change the receiving direction for better signal. The receiving ability and materials are far better than Yagi antennas
  • Save Your Installation Fee: Tools-free and easier installation. Compared with big size traditional yagi antenna, this modern antenna is much easier to install by our included accessories

Apparently if you post an Amazon link instead of using the Amazon tag, arfcom is inserting extra forwarding URLs to it. Edited my post to show amazon' tags only.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:12:54 PM EDT
Don't fall for the advertising BS for a "HD" or "digital" antenna.

Any TV antenna used for an analog signal will work just the same for the digital format. Reception of the specific frequency does not change, it is simply a different modulation (AM or FM or Digital/ATSC). An antenna designed to receive on channel 10 (192-198 MHz) will receive the same signal whether it is an AM, FM or ATSC modulation. The antenna does not care.

In a television broadcast channel, the signal is broadcast within a 6 MHz wide spectrum for both the old analog and new digital format (ATSC). Since the antenna only receives and does not process the signal, an antenna used for the old analog format will receive exactly the same signal levels for the digital format. Any antenna sold specifically for a digital signal is just marketing hype. Any sales person telling someone a certain antenna is better for the digital format is either lying or is clueless and doesn't know better.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:31:42 PM EDT
If your area is anything like mine, your "40 channels" are substantially less than that.  Most of the channels that you can theoretically receive are duplicates that are being broadcast from different towers. Being able to pick up ABC from three different towers doesn't really count as three channels.  In my neck of the woods, you can get the main networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, Fox) and one or two subchannels for each network.  There are also a handful of shitty other channels like foreign language channels.

Take a closer look at the reception map for your area and decide if you can pick up all the channels from one general direction. In my area, there are two towers that are about 15 degrees apart and two other towers that are in different directions.  I use a roof mounted directional antenna aimed between the two towers and get all the channels in my local area.  It is this antenna: https://www.channelmaster.com/Digital_HDTV_Outdoor_TV_Antenna_p/cm-2018.htm .  Also note that most areas only broadcast on UHF or Hi VHF channels so a "digital" antenna can be smaller, lighter, and less expensive by omitting the parts of the antenna used for VHF. Although my antenna is directional, I can also pick up channels in other directions because I am very close to those transmitters.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:32:44 PM EDT
Quoted:
Slowly moving the family towards cutting the cord. Looks like best case scenario I can get close to 40 over the air channels. Recommendations for a good outdoor antenna to put on the roof? Bonus if it attaches to a satellite mast.
View Quote
Play dumb when I come by and cut your cable.  It's easy, been streaming for the last 6 years now.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:33:45 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I have towers east, west, southwest and southeast.  15-25 miles line of sight.
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
How far are you from the towers?  Are they in one general direction or all around you?

I have a Winegard, and it works very well.
I have towers east, west, southwest and southeast.  15-25 miles line of sight.
You probably do not need an External antenna....an indoor will do.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:33:56 PM EDT
Indoor antennas work in our area.  You're only a stones throw away so it shouldn't be an issue either.  Btw, need to do dinner soon.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:35:12 PM EDT
I have one like this on a sat mast. 

https://www.solidsignal.com/m/product.aspx?p=hdb4x
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:43:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:43:30 PM EDT
VHF Antenna - Amazon

Bowtie Antenna - Amazon

UHF/VHF Combiner - Amazon

I have both of these antenna in my attic with the combiner box. The regular "HD" bowtie antenna picks up the majority of the channels as they are broadcast in UHF. I was having trouble picking up some of the lower VHF channels, so I bought the VHF Antenna and then put the signals together with the combiner box.

Picture is awesome. Seriously, the super bowl looked better on my TV this year than my neighbor's with his HD cable receiver.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:47:39 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Don't fall for the advertising BS for a "HD" or "digital" antenna.

Any TV antenna used for an analog signal will work just the same for the digital format. Reception of the specific frequency does not change, it is simply a different modulation (AM or FM or Digital/ATSC). An antenna designed to receive on channel 10 (192-198 MHz) will receive the same signal whether it is an AM, FM or ATSC modulation. The antenna does not care.

In a television broadcast channel, the signal is broadcast within a 6 MHz wide spectrum for both the old analog and new digital format (ATSC). Since the antenna only receives and does not process the signal, an antenna used for the old analog format will receive exactly the same signal levels for the digital format. Any antenna sold specifically for a digital signal is just marketing hype. Any sales person telling someone a certain antenna is better for the digital format is either lying or is clueless and doesn't know better.
View Quote
YUP

We cut the cord back in the early 90's. Put up a radio shack antenna which still works to this day. We get about 20 stations. If I put a rotator on it I may pick up more


this is the one we use
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 8:59:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I have a clearstream antenna on the roof. I mounted it to the direct tv mast and used the coax that was already in place. Seemed to fit fine from what I remember.

I live in a pretty windy area and it's been fine.
View Quote
clearstream antenna


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001BRXW74?tag=vglnk-c102-20


Clearstream 4 from Antennas Direct
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:00:15 PM EDT
Walmart.com 150 mile outdoor tv antenna , mine works great for $30 and comes with coax.HD TV Antenna
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:07:11 PM EDT
I built one like the diagram a few posts ago. My design had a piece of hardware cloth behind the elements. 3 years and it's still going strong...

cap
kb1iix (Amateur Extra in Vermont)
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:11:27 PM EDT
We cut the cord. Got one of these, sling tv, and Netflix. It's been great. This antenna matches the trim on our house so it's nearly invisible. You need to find out how far away your stations are and what direction. Ours are 30 miles and all in one general direction so this works really well. 

Amazon antenna
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:17:40 PM EDT
I just tried TVFool to find out which stations are in my area.  All I get back is:



Off grid remote really means off grid remote.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:18:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I just tried TVFool to find out which stations are in my area.  All I get back is:



Off grid remote really means off grid remote.
View Quote
That was really helpful.
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 10:26:15 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
That was really helpful.
View Quote
Sorry.  I've tried several antennas and none of them have worked for me.  My nearest station is about 80 miles away.  The "range" estimates on antennas are like MPG stickers.  YMMV, but will always be lower.
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 11:04:45 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Ha ! I just finished making one for the garage, it works, got 21 channels, though the channels are mostly bullshit. ETA: spent 3 dollars on it because I needed copper wire and the quick connect transformer. Got a 10 ft scrap of romex for $1 and the connector for $2, then I found the one I thought I had later.
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