Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 6/8/2009 5:44:17 PM EST
They impacted a tree 1200 feet short of
our local airport in an Arion Aircraft Lightning
with a Jabiru 3300 power plant with light &
variable wind conditions. They announced mid
field cross over, downwind, and base with no
apparent issues. No known cause, at this time.
NTSB should have arrived on scene by now.

Rest in peace, Rick & Duane.

I have made these comments here to tell
everyone out there to be safe, and remember
that no one is promised tomorrow.

God Bless & Godspeed, all...

John
Link Posted: 6/8/2009 5:48:42 PM EST
sorry to hear about that.
Link Posted: 6/8/2009 5:50:49 PM EST
Very sorry to hear about your loss. Prayers and heartfelt condolences out to you and your friends families.

Link Posted: 6/8/2009 5:55:27 PM EST
Sorry to hear that.

I considered the Lightning for awhile before selecting another design. I may have met those guys somewhere...
Link Posted: 6/8/2009 7:40:47 PM EST
wow - that blows...nt what I expected when I opened the thread - condolensces.
Link Posted: 6/9/2009 4:43:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/11/2009 6:03:34 PM EST
I learned today that the prop had no
circular score marks which leads one
to believe that engine had stopped.
Rick, had said it had some really weird
stall characteristics...

It's now thought the engine quit as they
were extending their base leg to downwind
for 27 after they were told by the manager that
the winds had swung around favoring the
other approach, and milking it became fatal...
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 3:00:19 AM EST
That is sort of a slick airplane, airframe-wise.
I wonder what the stall speed was for their particular airframe?

While I selected another airplane, I have the same engine

I'll be keeping an eye on this investigation...
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 3:02:41 AM EST
Unfortunately, this sounds all to familiar. Something bad happens, like an engine failure, and people on the ground take a bad situation and make it unsurvivable. Marvelous!

When you have an engine failure down low, you have very limited options. Turning more than about 30 degrees off your current heading isn't one of them. When I went through the Navy flight school, they really hammered loss of engine on take-off and landing. On take-off, if they failed the engine and you attempted to do anything but land pretty much straight ahead, you got a down. Get a couple of those and you were done.

As an example, review the voice tapes of the airliner that went down in the Hudson River. The Departure Control guy was worse than worthless. Good thing Sully knew how to fly.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 3:07:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 3:10:48 AM EST by abpt1]
Sorry for your loss ...we had lost two students due to wake from a heavy .

http://www.airdisaster.com/reports/ntsb/AAR81-01.pdf
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 3:21:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 3:34:30 AM EST by Johnny_C]
Guys,

The website says stalls were 40
with flaps, and 51 clean, which I
find hard to believe...

Clem, I agree with you comments about
straight ahead for engine out, but Rick,
the instructor was very experienced...

pt1, I have always been very concerned
about wake turbulence. I have never had to
closely follow a big jet when flying into or
out of our local Class C airport...

I guess posting this here is a way
for me to come to grips with the loss,
as well as, hope that someone might
learn from their mistakes.

Thanks.

John

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 3:01:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By ClemY:
Unfortunately, this sounds all to familiar. Something bad happens, like an engine failure, and people on the ground take a bad situation and make it unsurvivable. Marvelous!

When you have an engine failure down low, you have very limited options. Turning more than about 30 degrees off your current heading isn't one of them. When I went through the Navy flight school, they really hammered loss of engine on take-off and landing. On take-off, if they failed the engine and you attempted to do anything but land pretty much straight ahead, you got a down. Get a couple of those and you were done.

As an example, review the voice tapes of the airliner that went down in the Hudson River. The Departure Control guy was worse than worthless. Good thing Sully knew how to fly.



I take real exception to your comment there. Have you any clue as to what it is like to work in a TRACON in a major metropolitan area? Yes, the Airbus declared an emergency, however, you have a

shit-storm of planes all around from three major airports within spitting distance of eachother. Those planes just cannot be magically whisked out of the way instantaneously.

Top Top