Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 11/4/2015 10:21:20 AM EDT
Here's the deal-

Jr.45 had a dismal year last year in school, in fact the last three. His severe ADHD is far more under control than it has been in the past, but his past behavior follows him like a bad rash. After dealing with the administration at his school, it's clear they give zero fucks and are more interested in covering their ass than anything else. This school year, he is in 8th grade (and really has no right to be there since his average grade was a D+ at end of year 7th grade), we enrolled him in online K-12 and he's fucking that up by simply not doing the assignments.

I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. He adjusted to the new format, problem is he's addicted to World of Tanks. What I need is to block the WoT site at my router, so he cannot access it on any device in our home.

Second to that, can someone explain to me how I can mirror what's on his screen on my own laptop? I have zero experience with setting up a home network, I'm not especially tech savvy, so I'd need to "paint by the numbers" so to speak.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:24:13 AM EDT
(on macs) there are parental settings that should be able to block websites as well as desktop mirroring software that should be pretty cheap. I'm sure there are options for PC's. I don't think you need to do anything through your router.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:25:00 AM EDT
Might get a much easier to understand answer if we know what model router you're using.

You should also be able to restrict the access on the computer itself. I know my computer has a separate "child" profile where I've restricted EVERYTHING that I don't specifically allow. From there you just specify what websites you want him to have access to, google, wiki, whatever the school site is, etc.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:29:57 AM EDT
Need type of computers and OS (s) involved. Also what's the brand and model number of your broadband router? Yes, all that you're looking for is possible but you do need to be a little tech savvy.

Considered moving his computer into the living room or someplace it's easy to see his screen? That's the absolute first thing I'd do, like today the rest can follow.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:33:41 AM EDT
The simplest option: add the World of Tanks to the hosts file on his computer.

127.0.0.1 worldoftanks.com
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:36:53 AM EDT
Better educate yourself pretty quick. You need to be smarter than him when it comes to computers/routers. Whatever you implement, prepare for an escalation of hostilities. BTDT.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:37:26 AM EDT
It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:39:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
The simplest option: add the World of Tanks to the hosts file on his computer.

127.0.0.1 worldoftanks.com
View Quote

He's in 8th grade.  He will probably win a tech war, especially when you bring a blunt sword like that to the fight.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:41:14 AM EDT
Log into the router.  It should be password protected and not with the "admin" password but one you set.
Find page with blocked links and enter the World of Tanks URL.  That will then block him at the router.  It would be best if we knew the exact model for step by step.It's fairly easy to do though.

Had to do something similar and also used it as an easy way to block my kids when they were grounded.  I'd literally lock their machine of the intra net here at home.  
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:43:34 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


The simplest option: add the World of Tanks to the hosts file on his computer.



127.0.0.1 worldoftanks.com
View Quote


That would work - until the son edits the HOSTS file.



 
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:45:42 AM EDT
https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/



Manage your DNS
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:46:29 AM EDT
Quoted:
...
I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. ...
View Quote




Parental discipline is in order, and it may require sitting behind him 6 hours a day until he earns your trust and is willing to focus.
Then you don't have to sit at the kitchen table with him, but can move to the couch in the living room where you still have a view of his screen.

Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:48:22 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:




Parental discipline is in order, and it may require sitting behind him 6 hours a day until he earns your trust and is willing to focus.
Then you don't have to sit at the kitchen table with him, but can move to the couch in the living room where you still have a view of his screen.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
...
I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. ...




Parental discipline is in order, and it may require sitting behind him 6 hours a day until he earns your trust and is willing to focus.
Then you don't have to sit at the kitchen table with him, but can move to the couch in the living room where you still have a view of his screen.


You realize some kids just don't change? This isn't a parenting thread.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:50:39 AM EDT
Quoted:
Here's the deal-

Jr.45 had a dismal year last year in school, in fact the last three. His severe ADHD is far more under control than it has been in the past, but his past behavior follows him like a bad rash. After dealing with the administration at his school, it's clear they give zero fucks and are more interested in covering their ass than anything else. This school year, he is in 8th grade (and really has no right to be there since his average grade was a D+ at end of year 7th grade), we enrolled him in online K-12 and he's fucking that up by simply not doing the assignments.

I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. He adjusted to the new format, problem is he's addicted to World of Tanks. What I need is to block the WoT site at my router, so he cannot access it on any device in our home.

Second to that, can someone explain to me how I can mirror what's on his screen on my own laptop? I have zero experience with setting up a home network, I'm not especially tech savvy, so I'd need to "paint by the numbers" so to speak.
View Quote


Most routers have a block list in their administrative settings. There are a number of ways you can approach this, but first need to know what OS you are running and how computer savvy your boy is?
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:52:56 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Better educate yourself pretty quick. You need to be smarter than him when it comes to computers/routers. Whatever you implement, prepare for an escalation of hostilities. BTDT.
View Quote


This right here.

I'm not a fan of technical solutions for behavior problems, especially if the implementer is a novice.

ETA How is the school work performed, presumably in a browser?  Is there any required software (MS Office comes to mind).

If this runs strictly in a web browser you can get a cheap Chromebook for him to do his work in.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 10:55:24 AM EDT
There is Open Source software too that you might check out called K9.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:09:24 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.
View Quote
My oldest daughter also attended online school for three years, but for different reasons. Any computer that a kid accesses (under 17 at a minimum) needs to be in a public area of the home, with long sight lines to the screen. There is no reason for privacy in school work. Some times, it's inconvenient and you need to be considerate of their need for quiet study time.

 



You also need to keep up on his work load and due dates. You may not need to sit there for six hours a day, but for now you need to be the parent and stand behind him.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:18:21 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/

Manage your DNS
View Quote


until you figure out how to do it at the router, the above is correct. Open dns, the site has all the info you will need to block the site/s
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:19:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/

Manage your DNS
View Quote


Until he figures out to change DNS to 8.8.8.8

ETA:  For this to be a solution you need to reject all outbound DNS on port 53 going anywhere EXCEPT the OpenDNS IPs.  Then make sure he can't log into the router.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:26:38 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Until he figures out to change DNS to 8.8.8.8

ETA:  For this to be a solution you need to reject all outbound DNS on port 53 going anywhere EXCEPT the OpenDNS IPs.  Then make sure he can't log into the router.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
https://www.opendns.com/home-internet-security/

Manage your DNS


Until he figures out to change DNS to 8.8.8.8

ETA:  For this to be a solution you need to reject all outbound DNS on port 53 going anywhere EXCEPT the OpenDNS IPs.  Then make sure he can't log into the router.

And it still doesn't prevent his buddy from teaching him how to get what he wants.  If he is addicted to World of Tanks, he's going to get to World of Tanks.  As someone mentioned above, this won't work if the enforcer is an amateur. If the kid is smart and motivated to get what he wants, the whole except use is going to be futile and probably end up aggravating the problems.  This isn't blocking drooling idiots from Candy Crush at work.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:28:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:30:02 AM EDT
Buy Torch off of Kickstarter, enjoy simplicity
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:38:59 AM EDT
I would put a camera right behind him and over his shoulder. So he knows your recording him. Tell him your are going to be checking it everyday. This of course is on top of blocking stuff.  You might consider blocking everything but the websites he needs from 8am-3pm or something.  If he needs access to a new site he has to ask you to add it.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:41:01 AM EDT
Does it have to actually be done online or can it be copied worked on paper then entered online. Remember predator was one super high tech alien and got beat by plain old fashioned mud.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:44:03 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:




Parental discipline is in order, and it may require sitting behind him 6 hours a day until he earns your trust and is willing to focus.
Then you don't have to sit at the kitchen table with him, but can move to the couch in the living room where you still have a view of his screen.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
...
I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. ...




Parental discipline is in order, and it may require sitting behind him 6 hours a day until he earns your trust and is willing to focus.
Then you don't have to sit at the kitchen table with him, but can move to the couch in the living room where you still have a view of his screen.



Yep. This is a parenting issue, not a technology issue.

Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:44:18 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Better educate yourself pretty quick. You need to be smarter than him when it comes to computers/routers. Whatever you implement, prepare for an escalation of hostilities. BTDT.
View Quote




This.  

I'm not saying don't do it. I'm just saying that if you do it, it's on.  The fact that you have to ask here makes me nervous about your long-term prospects of winning the arms race, technically speaking.  

You'll need to take what you learn and apply to round 1 and keep building on it. There are a dozen or more things he could do to get around your block.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:44:30 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Buy Torch off of Kickstarter, enjoy simplicity
View Quote

Link?  Nothing jumps out from googling "kickstarter torch"
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:47:02 AM EDT
Almost everything posted so far would work, at least initially, but only if the kid doesn't avoid the home Internet connection entirely and use someone else's (or his own) wireless connection.  His age/financial situation may help prevent that.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:47:11 AM EDT
If you do block it at the router make sure it has a complex log in password… also make sure the neighbors don't have any open netoworks and that his phone will not let him create a hotspot

Good Luck

ETA: as others have stated I do not believe blocking it is the right approach, it's a behavioral issue
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:49:59 AM EDT
If it's a laptop take the damn thing away except on weekends.  Let him do school work in the kitchen where you can see him.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:54:05 AM EDT
Change his password so only you know it.  After he gets his work done then login and let him play for a while.

There are ways around this too I know but it's something.  If he's got a ton of time invested in that account it is very valuable to him.

Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:56:34 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.
View Quote




 
When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 11:58:29 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Change his password so only you know it.  After he gets his work done then login and let him play for a while.

There are ways around this too I know but it's something.  If he's got a ton of time invested in that account it is very valuable to him.

View Quote


The kid has no right to play the game. If he's barely pulling down Ds, and not doing his work, there wouldn't even be a world of tanks game on the computer until we were seeing Bs.

I explain regularly to my kids that they have one 'JOB'. School. If you fail at your job, you get no benefits. No TV, no cell phone, nothing. You earn those things by doing your job.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:00:02 PM EDT
Quoted:
Here's the deal-

Jr.45 had a dismal year last year in school, in fact the last three. His severe ADHD is far more under control than it has been in the past, but his past behavior follows him like a bad rash. After dealing with the administration at his school, it's clear they give zero fucks and are more interested in covering their ass than anything else. This school year, he is in 8th grade (and really has no right to be there since his average grade was a D+ at end of year 7th grade), we enrolled him in online K-12 and he's fucking that up by simply not doing the assignments.

I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. He adjusted to the new format, problem is he's addicted to World of Tanks. What I need is to block the WoT site at my router, so he cannot access it on any device in our home.

Second to that, can someone explain to me how I can mirror what's on his screen on my own laptop? I have zero experience with setting up a home network, I'm not especially tech savvy, so I'd need to "paint by the numbers" so to speak.
View Quote


So he's the one killing every time I'm about to win a battle!!!
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:01:31 PM EDT
I can help you. First I need you to go to whatismyip.com and IM me your IP address. Also, include the make and model of your router. You've never reset the password from the default options, right?










Just kidding, don't do this.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:05:10 PM EDT
this is a pretty long and lengthy conversation OP thats starts with you being a dad first and you being a IT guy second..



if you want to get into how to be an IT person you need to start with what kind of hardware you got at your disposal including what type of internet you have and what type of router you own. then what type of PCs you have and who has access to them. Then what kind of mobile devices and smart TVs you have.


kids are smart.. Prepare to go into dick mode. Being a parent is far easier than being a dick IT guy.



<---- Dick IT guy and dad..
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:05:28 PM EDT

Quoted:




I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day. He adjusted to the new format, problem is he's addicted to World of Tanks. What I need is to block the WoT site at my router, so he cannot access it on any device in our home.



Second to that, can someone explain to me how I can mirror what's on his screen on my own laptop? I have zero experience with setting up a home network, I'm not especially tech savvy, so I'd need to "paint by the numbers" so to speak.
View Quote


It's something you've got to tackle from a few angles. I'm sure you're aware of most of them (trust building and parental discipline) so I don't plan to preach to the choir here



As far as the computer goes, though, the first thing is that it needs to be in a communal area.



You're also going to need to set up usernames and passwords on your computers. You get to be the administrator, he gets to be a boring old user. It goes without saying, passwords that he's not going to guess.



Windows 7 or later (not sure about earlier) used to have a parental control system. It gave you a simplified user interface for setting rules on computer usage - you could completely block a site, or give limited access to a site, limit access to the computer/internet to certain hours of the day, etc. If memory serves, you could also control which programs could be installed or run on the computer. It's free and designed for parents who aren't tech gurus but want to do what you want to do. Look into it.



As far as remotely viewing the desktop, there are a handful of programs that would allow you to do that. That gets a bit trickier, but not massively so. There's a kind of software called "VNC" that allows you to see and control a desktop from across a network. Something like TightVNC is a free version. It works by running a server on the target computer, which would be configured to start when the computer starts and run all the time without allowing the user to stop it. You can then run a client from another computer (ie your laptop) which would allow you to log in and view what was happening.



I believe most VNC software will alert the user that someone has logged in and is watching them. Which I approve of, incidentally. I personally wouldn't use that bit of software in that manner unless there was something majorly, majorly wrong with what the kids are doing - and if it got to the stage that I needed to do it, they probably shouldn't have unsupervised access to the computer anyway.



Personally I'd suggest looking into the MS parental controls, moving the computer into a communal area, and leaving the VNC alone for now.



http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/set-parental-controls





 
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:05:44 PM EDT
Try this:
http://www1.k9webprotection.com/

It's free and uses BlueCoat's webpulse network (BlueCoat is enterprise-grade content filtering). You can block sites by URL or by category.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:10:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

  When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.

  When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.


Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:12:36 PM EDT
Also, let him play the game. He's a kid and kids love playing games - and that's all part of parcel of being a kid. Just link the amount he can play to his behaviour. "Firm but fair" is infinitely better in the long run than "acting like a dick".
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:15:16 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.

  When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.


Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.

If the kid is halfway computer literate it will not slow him down much.

Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:16:27 PM EDT



Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.



View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:






Quoted:



It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.




  When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.




Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.






CMOS Jumper.






Which is why I said there has to be supervision. When it comes to IT security, physical access makes all but the most hardened of hardware/networks child's play.



 




ETA:




And beat to it.

 
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:23:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Why not?  If that's what's required to get the job done then that is what you have to do.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day.


Why not?  If that's what's required to get the job done then that is what you have to do.


For one, I'm not going to educate him that he can dictate how I spend my day. I already put in my work, and am going to enjoy the rewards of such. HE needs to get with the program and learn to get his shit done in a timely manner.

I'm more than willing to help further explain something he can't grasp, to sit and help him study and to monitor his science labs, ect, however idly sitting watching him as a helicopter Dad won't solve a thing other than pissing me off further.

We're on Frontier Verizon- a Netgear 7550 and his Toshiba is running Windows 10 Home Edition. I've deleted Steam, WoT and other game files from the program directory.


ETA- Enough with the parenting stuff guys, I'm the world's worst example of such and will continue to blunder my way through, no doubt there. This is about removing his easy access to distractions, not cutting him off completely. He has an IPad he can play on, as well as a phone, both of which I control his physical access to. Once his school work is done, and I have verified that, he has free access to those devices.

Again, the issue is distraction, and as long as the path of least resistance is to get his schoolwork done first, he'll comply.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:23:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

If the kid is halfway computer literate it will not slow him down much.

http://panam.gateway.com/s/MOTHERBD/INTEL/2518943/251894315.jpg
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
It depends on what your router is capable of. My Asus lets me block and also view sites visited.  It will take about 3 seconds of him asking friends at school to figure out a way around it though. My parents would have had a 0% success rate in restricting my access to whatever I chose.  Putting the computer in the living room helped the most.

  When I was a kid, there wasn't an adult I ever encountered that could outwit me in IT. Even restricted networks at school/libraries/etc were cake to circumvent. Depending on the OP's kid's level of tech savvy, a simple SOHO router is not going to have the capabilities to do anything meaningful. Some software might slow him down, but that is one LiveCD away from getting around. I would second the idea of the computer in a common living space. Any measures taken to restrict access are going to have to come with supervision.


Password the BIOS and remove the DVD drive and USB from the boot options.

If the kid is halfway computer literate it will not slow him down much.

http://panam.gateway.com/s/MOTHERBD/INTEL/2518943/251894315.jpg


Hence, my first post about escalation of hostilities. And passwording the BIOS is merely the opening gambit in the campaign. The doomsday option is to just get rid of the computer. The threat of that is usually sufficient. But you have to be prepared to follow through on that threat.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:25:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


For one, I'm not going to educate him that he can dictate how I spend my day. I already put in my work, and am going to enjoy the rewards of such. HE needs to get with the program and learn to get his shit done in a timely manner.

I'm more than willing to help further explain something he can't grasp, to sit and help him study and to monitor his science labs, ect, however idly sitting watching him as a helicopter Dad won't solve a thing other than pissing me off further.

We're on Frontier Verizon- a Netgear 7550 and his Toshiba is running Windows 10 Home Edition. I've deleted Steam, WoT and other game files from the program directory.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day.


Why not?  If that's what's required to get the job done then that is what you have to do.


For one, I'm not going to educate him that he can dictate how I spend my day. I already put in my work, and am going to enjoy the rewards of such. HE needs to get with the program and learn to get his shit done in a timely manner.

I'm more than willing to help further explain something he can't grasp, to sit and help him study and to monitor his science labs, ect, however idly sitting watching him as a helicopter Dad won't solve a thing other than pissing me off further.

We're on Frontier Verizon- a Netgear 7550 and his Toshiba is running Windows 10 Home Edition. I've deleted Steam, WoT and other game files from the program directory.


Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:25:46 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


For one, I'm not going to educate him that he can dictate how I spend my day. I already put in my work, and am going to enjoy the rewards of such. HE needs to get with the program and learn to get his shit done in a timely manner.

I'm more than willing to help further explain something he can't grasp, to sit and help him study and to monitor his science labs, ect, however idly sitting watching him as a helicopter Dad won't solve a thing other than pissing me off further.

We're on Frontier Verizon- a Netgear 7550 and his Toshiba is running Windows 10 Home Edition. I've deleted Steam, WoT and other game files from the program directory.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'm retired (military medical), and have the freedom to remain home with him, but I am not going to sit behind him 6 hours a day.


Why not?  If that's what's required to get the job done then that is what you have to do.


For one, I'm not going to educate him that he can dictate how I spend my day. I already put in my work, and am going to enjoy the rewards of such. HE needs to get with the program and learn to get his shit done in a timely manner.

I'm more than willing to help further explain something he can't grasp, to sit and help him study and to monitor his science labs, ect, however idly sitting watching him as a helicopter Dad won't solve a thing other than pissing me off further.

We're on Frontier Verizon- a Netgear 7550 and his Toshiba is running Windows 10 Home Edition. I've deleted Steam, WoT and other game files from the program directory.


He has a user account and does not have the admin password? So he can't re-install the software you deleted.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:25:51 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Hence, my first post about escalation of hostilities. And passwording the BIOS is merely the opening gambit in the campaign. The doomsday option is to just get rid of the computer. The threat of that is usually sufficient. But you have to be prepared to follow through on that threat.

View Quote




 
That threat would be pretty weak considering, no computer, means no school work either.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:29:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

  That threat would be pretty weak considering, no computer, means no school work either.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Hence, my first post about escalation of hostilities. And passwording the BIOS is merely the opening gambit in the campaign. The doomsday option is to just get rid of the computer. The threat of that is usually sufficient. But you have to be prepared to follow through on that threat.

  That threat would be pretty weak considering, no computer, means no school work either.


There are ways around that, like OP downloading/printing assignments. That is a downside to the doomsday option. But be prepared to execute it.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:29:51 PM EDT
OpenDNS, easy and it's free.


You can filter all sites or specific ones or specific content.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:38:02 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


There are ways around that, like OP downloading/printing assignments. That is a downside to the doomsday option. But be prepared to execute it.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Hence, my first post about escalation of hostilities. And passwording the BIOS is merely the opening gambit in the campaign. The doomsday option is to just get rid of the computer. The threat of that is usually sufficient. But you have to be prepared to follow through on that threat.

  That threat would be pretty weak considering, no computer, means no school work either.


There are ways around that, like OP downloading/printing assignments. That is a downside to the doomsday option. But be prepared to execute it.

Umm- no.

K-12 is set up with Skype-like "Class Connect" sessions, generally, he has three mandatory classes a day, an hour each starting around 8 ending around 2. Some are back-to-back, others he has an hour or two break, it varies daily. Some assignments can be printed out, others don't lend themselves to it because online interaction with videos or other means is required to obtain the answer.

Prepared to execute threats? LOL...I'm not afraid of my kids.
Link Posted: 11/4/2015 12:42:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

Umm- no.

K-12 is set up with Skype-like "Class Connect" sessions, generally, he has three mandatory classes a day, an hour each starting around 8 ending around 2. Some are back-to-back, others he has an hour or two break, it varies daily. Some assignments can be printed out, others don't lend themselves to it because online interaction with videos or other means is required to obtain the answer.

Prepared to execute threats? LOL...I'm not afraid of my kids.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Hence, my first post about escalation of hostilities. And passwording the BIOS is merely the opening gambit in the campaign. The doomsday option is to just get rid of the computer. The threat of that is usually sufficient. But you have to be prepared to follow through on that threat.

  That threat would be pretty weak considering, no computer, means no school work either.


There are ways around that, like OP downloading/printing assignments. That is a downside to the doomsday option. But be prepared to execute it.

Umm- no.

K-12 is set up with Skype-like "Class Connect" sessions, generally, he has three mandatory classes a day, an hour each starting around 8 ending around 2. Some are back-to-back, others he has an hour or two break, it varies daily. Some assignments can be printed out, others don't lend themselves to it because online interaction with videos or other means is required to obtain the answer.

Prepared to execute threats? LOL...I'm not afraid of my kids.


Don't think you are afraid of them. Some parents (my ex was one of them) have a bigger bark than bite. And carrying through is just too hard.

ETA: Maybe he needs to go back to school. My ex tried the home school thing while I was deployed without telling me. Didn't work out so well for my son.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top