Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 4/1/2018 6:40:53 PM EDT
I took a motorcycle ride today over the mountain and back. Our mountain is one of the famous routes for motorcycles because of the curves, and because of that we always have a bunch of fatal crashes every year. The mountain is littered with signs telling Bikers to slow down, and this is what got me thinking. I was wearing my sidearm, and it got me thinking. In the event of a crash that involves the police, and other first responders what happens to the CCW?? Would you get it back? Does anyone know the protocol?
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 6:47:28 PM EDT
I believe EMS will call the police who will take custody of it.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 6:56:47 PM EDT
I had to surrender mine when I was being loaded into the ambulance, but my back was fractured so I couldn’t careless what happened to my gun. I couldn’t open my eyes I was hurting so bad. I picked it up a week later after I got out of the hospital.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 6:58:52 PM EDT
Here in Florida the Florida Highway Patrol turns them over to the Sheriff's Office for safe keeping. Some city PD's with their own evidence department usually keeps them. Getting them back is no problem here.

I once secured multiple firearms and ammo for a ARFCOM'er I didn't know. He was quite thankful as I packed them individually and carefully so as not to damage them.

Bottom line... it's still your property.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 7:01:25 PM EDT
I took my wife to the impound lot her totaled Audi was the day after the accident because of the 38 in her glove box. nobody had touched it, but I figured it would be gone.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 7:05:28 PM EDT
The ER security guy secured mine. My wife got it when she picked me up.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 7:10:25 PM EDT
State cop came to the hospital and followed me out to return mine.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 7:15:42 PM EDT
When I smacked a log truck and totaled my truck I had my 1911 on me.

While warming up in the officer's vehicle I told him I was armed, his response was "I don't care".
He was good enough to lift up the back seat of my truck and get the AR out and put it in the back seat of his vehicle.
When I got a ride in the tow truck he handed me the rifle and off I went.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 7:20:00 PM EDT
Well usually take custody of it as fire fighters and then try to hand off to LE if/when they show up before we have to leave the scene. Usually the guy most comfortable with guns on the call secures it, but in the middle of the shit that may be mag out, locking slide back and into a bunker pocket until we regroup.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 8:34:08 PM EDT
Cop took mine after a car accident while I was knocked the fuck out. He swung by the house a few days later and dropped it off.
Link Posted: 4/1/2018 9:58:27 PM EDT
If there is no friend or family member on scene the owner wants to take the weapon(s), we take possession and place into property. We then mail a letter to the owner. The owner has 60 days to contact property and get it returned. If they don't get it within 60 days it's disposed of.....although realistically, we'll probably hold weapons longer than that. State law requires we hold it for at least 60 days before disposing of it.
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 7:33:26 AM EDT
Last summer I was on the way to work in my personal car (no take home at the time). I ended up tboning a guy that ran a stop sign. Broken eye socket, nose, ribs, rotator cuff. Pretty bad off. I told the first officer on the scene that I was a cop, and that I was armed. It was at this point I realized how bad off I was, and requested a supervisor. The road sgt showed up, he secured my firearm and he ended up taking to my house and giving it to my fiance. The accident was right around the corner from the house.
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 9:42:38 AM EDT
Depends, if the pt is fucked up normally we give it to the cops and they give a receipt that we leave with pt belongings at hospital.

If it’s minor we had a padded gun case in a safe on the ambulance, we’d put it in there and pass off to security at the hospital. They’d put it in their safe and turn it over when the pt left.

Before that we would normally just unload, take it to the station and lock it in our medication vault. Whenever they got released from the hospital they would swing by and get it. But that stopped a couple years ago.

It is really area specific. Most just pass it to the cops and get a business card or receipt.
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 9:59:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2018 10:03:06 AM EDT by eric10mm]
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 10:02:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 10:52:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/2/2018 10:53:58 AM EDT by DanishM1Garand]
Hospital near here locks it in a locker like cops use at the court house. You get it back when discharged.

Originally Posted By eric10mm:

What sort of proof of ownership does your dept require to return the gun to the owner?  I don't have receipts for many of my guns.
View Quote
They have a chain of custody that it is yours.
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 12:54:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By eric10mm:

What sort of proof of ownership does your dept require to return the gun to the owner?  I don't have receipts for many of my guns.
View Quote
Nothing. As long as it's not stolen it goes back to the person who had it.
Link Posted: 4/2/2018 7:26:45 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CigarVet:
Last summer I was on the way to work in my personal car (no take home at the time). I ended up tboning a guy that ran a stop sign. Broken eye socket, nose, ribs, rotator cuff. Pretty bad off. I told the first officer on the scene that I was a cop, and that I was armed. It was at this point I realized how bad off I was, and requested a supervisor. The road sgt showed up, he secured my firearm and he ended up taking to my house and giving it to my fiance. The accident was right around the corner from the house.
View Quote
Are you ok now?
Link Posted: 4/5/2018 9:18:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/7/2018 11:44:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/18/2018 10:47:18 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:

We don't search cars involved in a crash.

It was in plain view or discovered on the person by EMS we would take it in for safe keeping.

Same with any other high value item.
View Quote
Does your towing inventory policy exempt cars from crashes? If so, have you guys had to square that inconsistency in court?

I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this...
Link Posted: 4/18/2018 4:29:49 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pevrs114:

Does your towing inventory policy exempt cars from crashes? If so, have you guys had to square that inconsistency in court?

I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this...
View Quote
Most crashes are owner request tow. No inventory needed.
Link Posted: 4/18/2018 10:21:45 PM EDT
I was really just curious if I went down on my bike with something in my waistband
Link Posted: 4/19/2018 7:19:09 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:

Most crashes are owner request tow. No inventory needed.
View Quote
That depends entirely on the jurisdiction.
Link Posted: 4/19/2018 8:58:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pevrs114:
That depends entirely on the jurisdiction.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Originally Posted By ColtRifle:

Most crashes are owner request tow. No inventory needed.
That depends entirely on the jurisdiction.
Why would you inventory a vehicle that the owner is having towed?
Link Posted: Yesterday 10:32:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: Yesterday 10:35:12 AM EDT by TheMercenary]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pevrs114:

Does your towing inventory policy exempt cars from crashes? If so, have you guys had to square that inconsistency in court?

I'm sure you can see where I'm going with this...
View Quote
In my jurisdiction if the driver is conscious and request “JohnDoeTowing” or “I don’t care” (next schedule) no slip is required therefore no inventory is required as it was towed per the owners request.

If the driver is not conscious or the tow is officer initiated as a result of an crime (DUI crash, driver fled the scene, etc.) then tow slip and inventory applies.

YMMV
Link Posted: Today 2:33:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: Today 2:38:50 AM EDT by Towely]
When I worked for a private ambulance company our policy was to either give it to PD or, if no PD were on scene, stuff it in a lock box we had on the ambulance.

We would let the hospital know we had a firearm onboard and their security would come grab it from us and store it for the patient.

I would almost always try to go with option two as I'm sure it involved MUCH less red tape for the patient to get their firearm back.

edit: A partner of mine went behind my back and reported me to one of our supervisors because I unloaded a Glock 19 a patient was carrying before storing it. According to her unloading it before locking it away was "Dangerous" and I shouldn't have handled the gun any more than necessary.

End of the day even if that specific company in the city I worked in were the ones to pick you up there is no telling what would happen to your gun. Ask 5 EMT's from there what protocol is and you'll get 2 different answers and 3 blank stares. We had an EMT get written up because he found a knife on an unconscious patient and decided the best course of action was to toss it out the side door onto the side of the road and leave it....and then document that he had done it in the report.
Top Top