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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/12/2005 9:39:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 9:39:38 AM EDT by Admiral_Crunch]
Does anybody here have any experience with Hyosung cycles? I'm especially looking for any experience with the Comet/GT 250 and the GT650, but info on any of their bikes would be helpful. I'm looking for my first bike, and I would love a traditional upright standard in the 30-55 hp range, but there aren't many new models to choose from anymore. I'm also looking at used, but I would prefer new if the prices aren't too crazy. Hyosung seems to be making a move to establish more of a presence in the US market, and they have some very interesting entry-level bikes. It looks like they've ditched Alphasports and started importing stuff under their Hyosung brand.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 11:21:28 AM EDT
The 650 engine is borrowed from the Suzuki SV650. If you wanted the 650cc engine, go with the suzuki sv650, for parts availability alone. Even if the Hyosung is cheaper it will take forever to get other body parts for it, where the SV has spares anywhere you look.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:30:42 PM EDT
Yeah, on the 650, I think I'm forced to agree unless Hyosung drops their price quite a bit.

I'm actually more interested in the 250. A 400-500 would be ideal, but almost every cycle maker just leaves a big gaping hole right where I want to start. I am still keeping my eye on the 650, but at roughly 79 horsepower, I'm afraid the GT650 and the sv650 might be a little too much power for a first bike.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:42:47 PM EDT

Stay away from the Chinese clones.
I mean like the plague.
Metal quality, fit and finish, parts support, technical assistance are all in the dumper.
In my experience, they use expired patent designs, then build them to looser tolerences.
NO Japanese brand parts won't necessarily fit, even if it LOOKS like it's a certain model of engine.
Too many times I had customers swear up and down sellers told them it was a certain model loaned to the clone companies.
NOT!!

Buy a Suzuki 600 Bandit if you want a good, more traditional riding position motorcycle.
DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 4:28:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:
Stay away from the Chinese clones.
I mean like the plague.
Metal quality, fit and finish, parts support, technical assistance are all in the dumper.
In my experience, they use expired patent designs, then build them to looser tolerences.
NO Japanese brand parts won't necessarily fit, even if it LOOKS like it's a certain model of engine.
Too many times I had customers swear up and down sellers told them it was a certain model loaned to the clone companies.
NOT!!

Buy a Suzuki 600 Bandit if you want a good, more traditional riding position motorcycle.
DaddyDett



I would never buy a Chinese motorcycle. That's why I'm looking at Hyosung.

Hyosung isn't Chinese. They're Korean, and they are a very large company. They just don't have much of a presence yet in the US market, as they are mainly known for smaller scooters and motorcycles. I have been told that they have produced engines and other parts for Suzuki for years. I will take a look at the Bandit.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 5:01:42 AM EDT

Korean is a notch better than Chinese, no doubt. That said, I'm not impressed with
what passes for quality standards from Kia or Hyundai. Like my brother says, who knows if the money that goes back to Korea stays in the South or not.


Yamaha and Honda also have 600 class semi-sport bikes in thier line-ups.
Yamaha's is the FZ6, Honda's is the 599.
A great bike, albeit a 750, is the 91-2003 CB750 Nighthawk. Although no longer in production, used ones should be readily available. Standard ergo's, a reasonable original price, and a time proven engine design make this one worth looking at too.

DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 7:11:19 AM EDT
That's my problem. Bikes seem to be either in the Nighthawk 750/SV650 power area (70-80 hp), or they're in the Nighthawk 250/Ninja 250 range of 20-30 hp. There's not much in between. There's the Vulcan 500, the Ninja 500, and the GS500, but they're all too small for me physically, except maybe the GS500, which I haven't tried to sit on yet. The Ninja 500 is too small for me, but the KLR650 is a little too tall. I guess I'm at just the right size to make fit difficult, which is leading me to look at more "non-mainstream" brands.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 7:23:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Admiral_Crunch:
That's my problem. Bikes seem to be either in the Nighthawk 750/SV650 power area (70-80 hp), or they're in the Nighthawk 250/Ninja 250 range of 20-30 hp. There's not much in between. There's the Vulcan 500, the Ninja 500, and the GS500, but they're all too small for me physically, except maybe the GS500, which I haven't tried to sit on yet. The Ninja 500 is too small for me, but the KLR650 is a little too tall. I guess I'm at just the right size to make fit difficult, which is leading me to look at more "non-mainstream" brands.




Just because the bike has 70hp doesn't mean it's going to be too much for you. You don't have to use all 70hp at once. I can peddle around on my SV no faster than a motor scooter. It's nice to have the extra power available in passing situations and other situations when someone swerves in your lane etc.. I wouldn't feel comfortable riding a 20-30hp bike on the highway. Just cause my dad's vette has 400hp doesn't mean I'll use half that much, I drive my civic faster most of the time.
Link Posted: 9/13/2005 9:11:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By michaelj1978:
Just because the bike has 70hp doesn't mean it's going to be too much for you. You don't have to use all 70hp at once. I can peddle around on my SV no faster than a motor scooter. It's nice to have the extra power available in passing situations and other situations when someone swerves in your lane etc.. I wouldn't feel comfortable riding a 20-30hp bike on the highway. Just cause my dad's vette has 400hp doesn't mean I'll use half that much, I drive my civic faster most of the time.



Is your SV your first bike? I'm just worried about a more powerful bike being less forgiving to newbie mistakes. I don't want a bike I can accidently wheelie or one with such powerful brakes that I can easily lock up the front if I squeeze just a little too hard. That sort of thing.

My only actual riding experience is a two-day MSF class on a Honda 125 and a short test ride on a Honda Shadow 500. The 125 was a bit cramped, but it was light, forgiving, and very easy to ride. A great learning tool, but I wouldn't want to try it on the state highway, you know? The Shadow had some definite muscle when I rolled on the throttle, and it felt great, but it had some major engine braking if I let off the throttle just a little bit -- but I've read it's notorious for that. That was kind of unnerving, as the 125 just coasted along with no throttle. I don't want to have to keep the throttle at exactly the right millimeter of position for my speed, if that makes any sense?

I have read such conflicting info, it's not even funny. For example, the Nighthawk 750. Some people say it is the perfect beginner's bike, and others say it's too powerful and heavy. It's hard to decide when you don't have any close friends or relatives who ride.

BTW, Thanks for the input all!
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 9:08:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Admiral_Crunch:

Originally Posted By michaelj1978:
Just because the bike has 70hp doesn't mean it's going to be too much for you. You don't have to use all 70hp at once. I can peddle around on my SV no faster than a motor scooter. It's nice to have the extra power available in passing situations and other situations when someone swerves in your lane etc.. I wouldn't feel comfortable riding a 20-30hp bike on the highway. Just cause my dad's vette has 400hp doesn't mean I'll use half that much, I drive my civic faster most of the time.



Is your SV your first bike? I'm just worried about a more powerful bike being less forgiving to newbie mistakes. I don't want a bike I can accidently wheelie or one with such powerful brakes that I can easily lock up the front if I squeeze just a little too hard. That sort of thing.

My only actual riding experience is a two-day MSF class on a Honda 125 and a short test ride on a Honda Shadow 500. The 125 was a bit cramped, but it was light, forgiving, and very easy to ride. A great learning tool, but I wouldn't want to try it on the state highway, you know? The Shadow had some definite muscle when I rolled on the throttle, and it felt great, but it had some major engine braking if I let off the throttle just a little bit -- but I've read it's notorious for that. That was kind of unnerving, as the 125 just coasted along with no throttle. I don't want to have to keep the throttle at exactly the right millimeter of position for my speed, if that makes any sense?

I have read such conflicting info, it's not even funny. For example, the Nighthawk 750. Some people say it is the perfect beginner's bike, and others say it's too powerful and heavy. It's hard to decide when you don't have any close friends or relatives who ride.

BTW, Thanks for the input all!




EX500 was my first bike, it had roughly 50hp. The SV does have a lot of engine braking, which I personally really like. You can also just ride a gear higher if you want and will have minimal braking. I like to keep the revs high however, (makes the exhaust sound nice). If you can find a used SV with 10-20K on it for around 3 grand go for it. I know of a guy with an SV who has 119K miles on his 1999 model. Strong motors that will last forever. At my rate, it's going to take me about 30 years to put that many miles on my bike. I don't plan on selling it ever.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 1:04:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By michaelj1978:
EX500 was my first bike, it had roughly 50hp. The SV does have a lot of engine braking, which I personally really like. You can also just ride a gear higher if you want and will have minimal braking. I like to keep the revs high however, (makes the exhaust sound nice). If you can find a used SV with 10-20K on it for around 3 grand go for it. I know of a guy with an SV who has 119K miles on his 1999 model. Strong motors that will last forever. At my rate, it's going to take me about 30 years to put that many miles on my bike. I don't plan on selling it ever.



What do you like about the engine braking? I guess I'm just not used to it. Don't see it too much in an automatic car, and I don't have a lot of experience with stick-shifts.

I have to agree with you on a bike like the SV being plenty for the long haul. I know I haven't ridden much, but I can't imagine ever wanting a bike that's much if any more powerful than that. Of course, my 4-banger 125 hp car is plenty for me 99% of the time.
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