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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 12/17/2005 10:29:33 PM EDT
I switched jobs a year ago. Before I switched, my 401K was giving me 9%. Now, I have rolled it over to the new companies plan, I am getting 3%. What the heck?

Both were in pre-determined "agressive" portfilios. Now what?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 8:31:41 AM EDT
No one?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 8:33:29 AM EDT
i have a mixed allocation. It gained about 8% this year
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 8:35:17 AM EDT
Mine is rockin'!
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 12:55:41 PM EDT
my funds are making 7-11%, except one is bringing the whole thing down for an overall 6.6% this year
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:01:11 PM EDT
My PRR through the Fidelity fund choices I have has returned 9.8% YTD.

Best of the bunch was an international fund. My bond and Magellan holdings drug my return down though.

Just because it says 'aggressive' doesn't mean it's a good investment option. There are a lot of 'aggressive' funds that completely blow and you shouldn't have your money in them.

-Observer
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:09:26 PM EDT
You may need to reevaluate your plan and diversify or change all together if your plan allows it. You should be making at least 7% percent right now, sounds like your fund manager may not be doing a good job or giving themselves a large Christmas bonus.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:12:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Shooter505:
You may need to reevaluate your plan and diversify or change all together if your plan allows it. You should be making at least 7% percent right now, sounds like your fund manager may not be doing a good job or giving themselves a large Christmas bonus.



+1 3% is junk...I know a few BANKS that give up to 4% APY......pretty sad that it should be anything less than that.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:17:23 PM EDT
About a 200.5k at the moment!
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:23:34 PM EDT
401k is decent considerering the circumstances.

My IRAs are much better since I've had direct control over them for a longer period. (>20 years)
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 1:58:41 PM EDT
I think mine went South for the Winter.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:02:34 PM EDT
Rockin' on at 13% for the year. It is in a very aggressive mix.

Bob
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:02:36 PM EDT
Very good last quarter, well see this quarter
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:04:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:27:08 PM EDT
Finally back up to the level it was after Y2k.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:31:36 PM EDT
15.89% this year and only 75% in stocks, 25% in bonds.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:40:23 PM EDT
Rolled my 401k into a self-directed IRA.
Up from 69k to 103k since last April.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 2:59:19 PM EDT
69K to 103K in 8 months. WOW!!!!!!!!!! Especially in a period of flat market performance. What's that like 8+%/month. I don't know what you do for a living but if you can continue this type of performance you'd get rich managing money for a mutual fund company. That type of performance beats 99+% of professional money managers. Impressive.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:35:11 PM EDT
So...

How do I pick where to put the funds, suggestions?
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:46:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By migradog:
Rolled my 401k into a self-directed IRA.
Up from 69k to 103k since last April.


Not bad!
I quit Aug. 04, and rolled my 401k into an IRA.
From Sept. 04 until last Friday I'm up 144.6%
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:54:01 PM EDT
Just breaking even, need some advice.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 3:58:24 PM EDT
I typically keep my 401(k)s in mostly in S&P500 index funds or SPYDRs (S&P Depository Receipts) so my returns are the same as the S&P 500. As I get closer to retrirement, I will allocate more to government bonds and other high-quality fixed income securities to protect the principal.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:37:31 PM EDT
OK, how about some tips for us little guys.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:49:07 PM EDT


For the 12 months ending 9/30/2005 11.33%
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:57:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ScrubJ:
OK, how about some tips for us little guys.



Earn big, spend small.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 4:59:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/18/2005 5:06:04 PM EDT by migradog]

Originally Posted By rc2:
69K to 103K in 8 months. WOW!!!!!!!!!! Especially in a period of flat market performance. What's that like 8+%/month. I don't know what you do for a living but if you can continue this type of performance you'd get rich managing money for a mutual fund company. That type of performance beats 99+% of professional money managers. Impressive.



Luck mostly. And thanks to an astute Arfcommer who mentioned a Silicon shortage here in the forums a while back. I did some research on silicon producers and came up with Komatsu,(KMTUY) who owns most of the silicon producing mines. So I bought a bunch of their stock a $29.00 a share. It's up to $65.00 now. Add my E-Trade, Ebay, Motorola and some gas & oil stocks and I did okay.

Best tip I can give. Do your research!! If you find something interesting or have a hunch, check it out thoroughly. That's how I found Komatsu and then MEMC (WFR).



Link Posted: 12/18/2005 5:00:50 PM EDT
Being self-employed, I put money into IRA CDs.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 5:08:30 PM EDT
I'm 10 years from retirement so I'm not invested aggressivley.
I'm with Fidelity and it only did +4% this year.
Not good - but at least I didn't lose.....
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 5:33:04 PM EDT
slash-5 and BallasticTip

You guys would be best served by keeping most of your stock money in an index that tracks the Wilshire 5000 (Vanguard Total Stock Market for example). Then maybe mix in an international fund.

I think that 8-10% going forward will be an expected return. Remember that the types of returns that have been mentioned can never be maintained over a 10+ year period. migradog admits that luck played a big part in his return. migradog got about a 67% return over 8 months. If he could get 67% annually in a tax deferred account like a 401K/IRA his $100,000 would worth tens of millions in a decade or so. I hope he can do it but 8-10% is what I'd plan on.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:44:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/18/2005 9:45:54 PM EDT by migradog]
There is no way my portfolio will continue to grow the way it did these past few months and I will consider myself lucky to get 8-10% in the future. I am also finding it difficult to put in the time needed to manage my investments. I work a rotating shift, so I can usually see what's happening when the market opens before I leave for work and I check several times during the day to follow up. One thing I've learned is knowing when to sell is as important as knowing when to buy.

rc2 is right with finding decent mutual funds to invest in. Just try to diversify a little. There are some great international funds and funds that are investing in small companies are doing well too. T Rowe Price offers some good funds.

I also think it's a good idea to subscribe to some generic financial magazines like Kiplinger's or Smart Money to educate yourself in investing. Most web sites like Yahoo, Excite and MSN have investment sections as well and offer a great place for free research. TheStreet.com is another site I like.

Luck played a big part in my gains, I hope knowledge keeps them growing. I doubt I'll be worth millions, but I plan on retiring comfortably.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:47:19 PM EDT
The last I checked mine, it's lost this year.

Anyone got any good advice? I believe I have it 50% in company stock (I work for Dell), and 50% is diversified, but I can't recall if I went with an agressive profile or a conservative...

I remember for 03, I think it was, my return was 20%. No shit.
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 9:52:20 PM EDT
Don't have a 401k. IRA and another Scottrade account.

I'm averaging over 17% per year for the last 3 years. Not bad for a rookie
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 10:12:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
Anyone got any good advice? I believe I have it 50% in company stock (I work for Dell), and 50% is diversified,



It's a bad idea to have that much of your wealth tied up in the company you work for. If they company has problems you may find yourself out of a job and with a big hit to your portfolio.

The best idea is to just dump it into an index fund that tracks the Whilshire 5000 (essentially all the publicly traded companies in the US.) I don't think it will make 8-10% per year, since valuations are already pretty high and intrest rates are low and unlikely to get lower. Research shows that the low-cost index funds consistently beat actively traded funds. Leave it alone for 30 years and you'll do well.

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