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Posted: 4/21/2007 5:47:44 PM EDT
I almost mowed over 3 little rabbits.  I am pretty sure they were abandoned as there was a dead one right outside the hole and they were pretty pathetic and weakly looking.  They didn't try and get away from me at all.  Well I would have just left them but I told my wife and that was not an option anymore.  So they have been staying in a box with cedar chips, a water bottle, rabbit food, and we've been putting fresh veggies in the box.  We have had them for about a week now.  They have eaten alot and drink alot.  They are alot more lively and show fear whenever we come around by tring to get away or hide.  One of them trys to jump out of the box when I get near and can almost do it.  They even look a little fatter.

When can I let these things go and them have a chance? I am not handling them much so that they won't get used to us and because I don't know what they could have diseases wise (I always wash my hands REALLY good after messing with them).  I am thinking about going ahead and letting them go but they are so small so I don't know and I promised my wife we would try and help them.

My second thought is raising them for a good stew.....

Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:50:43 PM EDT
[#1]
Stew Meat!
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:53:19 PM EDT
[#2]
9 iron
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:53:44 PM EDT
[#3]
Its a good sign they are trying to get away from you. I don't know... Maybe set up some area and observe how fast they are? Might be a good idea to set up some kind of burrow for them to take cover in from predators. It should be away from your house and probably just big enough for them as babies, that way they move out and find new places to stay as they get older. Just my guesses
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:54:55 PM EDT
[#4]
They are plenty old enough to be on their own..

Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:56:03 PM EDT
[#5]
somewhere, there is a hungry python dreaming of your little friends....
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:56:10 PM EDT
[#6]
My God thats cute. More pics of intense cuteness are needed to determine the proper answer to your question.  
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 5:58:45 PM EDT
[#7]
I had this happen a year or two back. The vet said when the little white patch on their head goes away they are ready to be set free. I gave them cats milk (I got this at the farm supply) and shredded carrots, lettuce and cilantro. They LOVE cilantro!!! Regular milk is bad for them. Good luck.

Lonnie
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 6:14:35 PM EDT
[#8]
Just let them loose in the house and you will know when!
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 6:21:57 PM EDT
[#9]

Quoted:
They are plenty old enough to be on their own..



+1000

Once they are eating solids, they're good to go basically.  

I keep domestic rabbits as pets but I raised one wild cottontail rabbit and read a lot about them.  You cannot raise pure cottontail rabbits in captivity.  They become more and more 'wild', eventually hurling themselves against the cage you keep them in or the wall of whatever enclosure.  As a sidenote, there are many animals that cannot be tamed even when raised from a very young age.  Cottontails are definitely one of them.  

As far as raising them for eating, don't bother.  They don't have a lot of meat on them.  There are plenty of good domestic breeds for that.  
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 6:22:48 PM EDT
[#10]
Either you're gonna eat them, or something else will.

Take your pick.
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 6:25:03 PM EDT
[#11]

Quoted:
and because I don't know what they could have diseases wise (I always wash my hands REALLY good after messing with them).


The only disease I would be concerned with is tularemia:


Many routes of human exposure to the tularemia bacteria are known to exist. The common routes include inoculation of the skin or mucous membranes with blood or tissue while handling infected animals, the bite of an infected tick, contact with fluids from infected deer flies or ticks, or handling or eating insufficiently cooked rabbit meat. Less common means of spread are drinking contaminated water, inhaling dust from contaminated soil or handling contaminated pelts or paws of animals. Tularemia is not spread from person to person.


Washing your hands is a good idea, but I wouldn't worry about it beyond that.
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 6:26:34 PM EDT
[#12]

Quoted:
My God thats cute. More pics of intense cuteness are needed to determine the proper answer to your question.  

Link Posted: 4/21/2007 7:14:48 PM EDT
[#13]
Have mercy!  If you keep wild wabbits that means some poor hawk or owl will be added to the endangered species list.  What will the fuds hunt?  The natural order of life is being altered.
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 7:15:37 PM EDT
[#14]
Have mercy!  If you keep wild wabbits that means some poor hawk or owl will be added to the endangered species list.  What will the fuds hunt?  The natural order of life is being altered.
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 7:18:23 PM EDT
[#15]
RUN AWAY! RUN AWAY!
Link Posted: 4/21/2007 7:33:42 PM EDT
[#16]
Thems good eatin

Link Posted: 4/21/2007 7:40:58 PM EDT
[#17]
Rabbit stew recipe includes rabbit, onions, celery, carrots, potatoes, mushrooms, and red wine.

INGREDIENTS:
1 rabbit, about 3 pounds, cut up
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons butter
1 cup chopped celery
2 medium onions, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
1 teaspoon salt
dash pepper
1 bay leaf
4 cups water
4 cups dry red wine
2 cups diced carrots
4 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
4 ounces sliced mushrooms, sauteed
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup water

PREPARATION:
Directions for rabbit stew.
Dredge rabbit pieces with 1/2 cup flour. Melt butter in a Dutch oven over medium heat; brown rabbit pieces on all sides. Add celery, onion, salt, pepper, bay leaf, 4 cups water, and wine; bring to the boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and simmer rabbit stew for 2 hours. Add carrots, potatoes, and mushrooms; cook for about 25 to 30 minutes longer, or until vegetables are tender. Combine 1/4 cup flour and 1/3 cup water; stir until well blended and smooth. Stir flour mixture into the broth; cook and stir until thickened.
Rabbit stew recipe serves 4.
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