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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/17/2005 11:20:37 AM EDT
anyone have any ideal how to make it read incorrectly....not to fry it just make it read wrong.....

does strong magnets effect it?..

the GPS device head is a round unit that is mounted on top of the roof...it's about 6-8 inchs round I suppose...

of course...this is for entertainment purposes only

Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:22:06 AM EDT
Let me guess, you drive a truck/van at your place of employment?

Wrap it in foil.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:22:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fastang50:
Let me guess, you drive a truck/van at your place of employment?

Wrap it in foil.



His head?
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:23:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:24:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jackpot:
anyone have any ideal how to make it read incorrectly....not to fry it just make it read wrong.....

does strong magnets effect it?..

the GPS device head is a round unit that is mounted on top of the roof...it's about 6-8 inchs round I suppose...

of course...this is for entertainment purposes only




Unplug it.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:25:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Originally Posted By fastang50:
Let me guess, you drive a truck/van at your place of employment?

Wrap it in foil.



His head?



The whole damned CAR, Man!
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:25:09 AM EDT
Since sunspots can effect these things - I imagine it wouldn't take too complicated of a circuit (like a comb generator) to flood the front end of the receiver on one of these things.

This would be something that could be powered by a small 9 volt battery and end being smaller than a pack of cigs.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:25:36 AM EDT
Well, the roof mounted antenna has to connect somewhere. Also, it may require a DVD to run, check the trunk. It is electrical, maybe has a dedicated fuse...


ByteTheBullet (-:
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:26:51 AM EDT
A couple 5.56 rounds at close range. Or at not-so-close range. After all, this is ARFCOM.

Need help?
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:27:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jackpot:
anyone have any ideal how to make it read incorrectly....not to fry it just make it read wrong.....

does strong magnets effect it?..

the GPS device head is a round unit that is mounted on top of the roof...it's about 6-8 inchs round I suppose...

of course...this is for entertainment purposes only




if it's YOUR car, disconnect it.

if it's a company vehicle, quit your job.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:29:59 AM EDT
Watch out if you're renting a car!

http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/WEBONLY/publicfeature/jul04/0704sens.html

Sensors & Sensibility

It's alarming! It's no big deal! How your personal information is being collected and protected, used and misused

By Jean Kumagai & Steven Cherry

0704sens01.jpgWHEN CANADIAN TOURIST BYUNGSOO SON picked up a rental car from a Payless office in San Francisco last November and set off with his wife and son on a 12-day tour of the California coast, Las Vegas, and the Grand Canyon, he had no idea how pricey that trip would be. Upon dropping off the car, he was floored when the expected US $260 charge turned out to be a whopping $3400, the result of a $1-a-mile fee that kicked in when Son crossed the California-Nevada border. Accompanying the bill was a detailed map of the family's route, made possible by the Global Positioning System tracking device installed in the car. Son had never bothered to read all of the fine print in his rental contract—who does, really?—which mentioned the out-of-state penalty and the possible presence of a tracking device.

Get used to it. One-fourth of rental cars in the United States now have GPS tracking installed, and over the last several years, at least two other companies have used the devices to fine errant drivers. If the car were stolen, or it broke down in a desert or a snowstorm, the trackers could be a lifesaver, the rental companies say. Some renters, if asked, might even appreciate a map of their trip as a souvenir. But having your every move tracked like a fugitive's? Most drivers, surely, would object. <snip>

Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:30:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By markm:

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Originally Posted By fastang50:
Let me guess, you drive a truck/van at your place of employment?

Wrap it in foil.



His head?



The whole damned CAR, Man!



Well, I was thinking just the antenna but if you've got enough foil to do the whole mess go for it!
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:34:03 AM EDT
Google "GPS jammer"
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:48:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 11:49:45 AM EDT by ChrisLe]
Two ways:

The antenna needs a clear view of the sky to obtain the satellite signal. As such, the easiest way to defeat the system is by covering the antenna with aluminum foil, preventing it from acquiring a signal.

A more stealthy way of permanently disabling the device would be to acquire a syringe from somebody and inject a salt water solution into the base of the antenna (or anywhere along the length of the cable), making sure to penetrate the cable. This will corrode the wires within the antenna and will drive the repair guys nuts as he will have a near impossible time tracking down the problem.....I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:02:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:
Two ways:

The antenna needs a clear view of the sky to obtain the satellite signal. As such, the easiest way to defeat the system is by covering the antenna with aluminum foil, preventing it from acquiring a signal.

A more stealthy way of permanently disabling the device would be to acquire a syringe from somebody and inject a salt water solution into the base of the antenna (or anywhere along the length of the cable), making sure to penetrate the cable. This will corrode the wires within the antenna and will drive the repair guys nuts as he will have a near impossible time tracking down the problem.....I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...




Hmmmm...I like that idea.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:08:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 12:08:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 1:50:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheTacticalSolution:

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

.I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...




That's just because they don't have any idea what they are doing. Broken/corroded wires won't hinder someone with basic troubleshooting ability and a good DMM.



We're talking civil service mechanics in the service of NYC......Does the word 'clueless' mean anything?
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 1:53:39 PM EDT
Trace antenna back to control box. Disconnect.

If it is hard wired (soldered), and you don't want to permanantly kill it, cut power to the control device.

Jim
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 1:57:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:
A more stealthy way of permanently disabling the device would be to acquire a syringe from somebody and inject a salt water solution into the base of the antenna (or anywhere along the length of the cable), making sure to penetrate the cable. This will corrode the wires within the antenna and will drive the repair guys nuts as he will have a near impossible time tracking down the problem.....I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...



Gawd, I learn such cool stuff here everyday. This place ROCKS
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 1:59:23 PM EDT
The answer is heavy lead shielding for the entire car.

And a lead cup for your personals.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:14:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Originally Posted By fastang50:
Let me guess, you drive a truck/van at your place of employment?

Wrap it in foil.



His head?

Nope, his resume. Because any employer that uses such devices will FIRE any employee that tampers with them.


Maybe he read last week's news bit about the guy hunted and busted for Felony Hit-and-Run, after his On-Star system ratted him out for Air-bag deployment at an accident scene he fled from.

Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:27:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rayra:

Maybe he read last week's news bit about the guy hunted and busted for Felony Hit-and-Run, after his On-Star system ratted him out for Air-bag deployment at an accident scene he fled from.




Speaking of On-Star...


news.com.com/2100-1029_3-5109435.html

Court to FBI: No spying on in-car computers

The FBI and other police agencies may not eavesdrop on conversations inside automobiles equipped with OnStar or similar dashboard computing systems, a federal appeals court ruled.

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said Tuesday that the FBI is not legally entitled to remotely activate the system and secretly use it to snoop on passengers, because doing so would render it inoperable during an emergency.

n a split 2-1 rulingthe majority wrote that "the company could not assist the FBI without disabling the system in the monitored car" and said a district judge was wrong to have granted the FBI its request for surreptitious monitoring.

The court did not reveal which brand of remote-assistance product was being used but did say it involved "luxury cars" and, in a footnote, mentioned Cadillac, which sells General Motors' OnStar technology in all current models. After learning that the unnamed system could be remotely activated to eavesdrop on conversations after a car was reported stolen, the FBI realized it would be useful for "bugging" a vehicle, Judges Marsha Berzon and John Noonan said.

When FBI agents remotely activated the system and were listening in, passengers in the vehicle could not tell that their conversations were being monitored. After "vehicle recovery mode" was disabled, the court said, passengers were notified by the radio displaying an alert and, if the radio was not on, the system beeping.

David Sobel, general counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center, called the court's decision "a pyrrhic victory" for privacy.

"The problem (the court had) with the surveillance was not based on privacy grounds at all," Sobel said. "It was more interfering with the contractual relationship between the service provider and the customer, to the point that the service was being interrupted. If the surveillance was done in a way that was seamless and undetectable, the court would have no problem with it."

Under current law, the court said, companies may only be ordered to comply with wiretaps when the order would cause a "minimum of interference." After the system's spy capabilities were activated, "pressing the emergency button and activation of the car's airbags, instead of automatically contacting the company, would simply emit a tone over the already open phone line," the majority said, concluding that a wiretap would create substantial interference.

"The FBI, however well-intentioned, is not in the business of providing emergency road services and might well have better things to do when listening in than respond with such services to the electronic signal sent over the line," the majority said.

In a dissent, Judge Richard Tallman argued that a wiretap would not create unnecessary interference with emergency service and noted that "there is no evidence that any service disruption actually occurred. The record does not indicate that the subjects of the surveillance tried to use the system while the FBI was listening. One cannot disrupt a service unless and until it is being utilized.

"The record indicates that the only method of executing the intercept order in this case involved activating the car's microphone and transferring the car's cellular telephone link to the FBI. This conduct might have amounted to a service disruption, had the subjects of the surveillance attempted to use the system, but there is no evidence that they did."

The majority did point out that the FBI cannot order the system to be changed so that the emergency functions would work during surveillance. Congress ordered telephone companies to do just that in the 1994 Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, but current law does not "require that the company redesign its system to facilitate surveillance by law enforcement."

General Motors did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Wednesday. Its OnStar privacy policy says: "OnStar may disclose personal information if required to do so by law on (sic) in the good faith belief that such disclosure is reasonably necessary to comply with the legal process...OnStar cannot accept any responsibility for accidental or inadvertent disclosure, unauthorized access or for other disclosure as required by law or described in this policy."

The decision is binding only in California, Oregon, Nevada, Washington, Hawaii, and other states that fall within the 9th Circuit's jurisdiction. No other appeals court appears to have ruled on the matter.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:35:04 PM EDT
A lead cover of some kind would block the signal or just unplug the antenna. another option is the tuna can trick, tape a large tuna can over the antenna. This might not work on newer GPS systems.

20
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:38:01 PM EDT
wow, it actually applies...

Nuke it from orbit, its the only way to be sure.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 2:43:40 PM EDT
I would like to know how to disable the GPS built into my cellphone.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:14:26 PM EDT
Went out on a job one time that had some not so happy workers on it. They thought it was great fun to stick a pin thru our wires and cut off the ends so you couldn't see em.
I don't see why this wouldn't work on your gps power wires. It gets turned on and you will find the fuse in a big hurry. If the mechanics fix the problem well then you know which fuse to pull when you get the vehicle back.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 4:22:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 4:25:32 PM EDT by FREEFALLE7]
This site shows how to hack a on star system. none of my vehicles have GPS's, but when I get a new truck it will go by by

members.cox.net/onstar/

and a onstar forum

www.onstarforum.com/phpbb/viewforum.php?f=8&sid=37abe636547aede680354e4f0f72d5f3
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 7:53:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

Originally Posted By TheTacticalSolution:

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

.I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...




That's just because they don't have any idea what they are doing. Broken/corroded wires won't hinder someone with basic troubleshooting ability and a good DMM.



We're talking civil service mechanics in the service of NYC......Does the word 'clueless' mean anything?



thanks for wasting tax dollars ass
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:02:26 PM EDT
bad idea. A friend of mine got fired cause for some reason all the trucks he drove had problems with the GPS.
How did they prove it?
He was the only one with the problem
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:14:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
bad idea. A friend of mine got fired cause for some reason all the trucks he drove had problems with the GPS.
How did they prove it?
He was the only one with the problem



He just said it wasn't a work car, it's a rental. Although I don't see the problem myself---I've rented a car several times and taken it over state lines and there was no charge. I wouldn't rent a car from a place that would charge me mileage if I left the state.
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:15:02 PM EDT
Do rental car agreements have a proviso in the rental agreement that tampering with the GPS is verboten? They soon will, if they don't already.


Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:25:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lu380:
I would like to know how to disable the GPS built into my cellphone.



Only a few phones do. And those that do it is only enabled during emergency calls. Its possible it could be turned on remotely but I can't really say.

-Foxxz
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:27:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:48:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sharky30:

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

Originally Posted By TheTacticalSolution:

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

.I used method 2 at work and they've replaced component after component and still haven't figured it out...




That's just because they don't have any idea what they are doing. Broken/corroded wires won't hinder someone with basic troubleshooting ability and a good DMM.



We're talking civil service mechanics in the service of NYC......Does the word 'clueless' mean anything?



thanks for wasting tax dollars ass



You're welcome....
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 8:52:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HeavyMetal:
Most cellphone fix your position thru triangulation between multiple towers.

To deactivate, simply turn you cellphone off.



Only partially correct.

To help answer the original question about phones, who is your provider? If Nextel, then you're good for a few more weeks, others...
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 9:04:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lu380:
I would like to know how to disable the GPS built into my cellphone.

There's a menu option somewhere in its options to disable it for all but 911 calls, I do believe.
Link Posted: 8/20/2005 9:16:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rayra:

Originally Posted By lu380:
I would like to know how to disable the GPS built into my cellphone.

There's a menu option somewhere in its options to disable it for all but 911 calls, I do believe.



Correct. All phase 2 phones give us Lat/Long when dialing 911. No way to disable it.
Link Posted: 8/21/2005 5:59:08 AM EDT
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