Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 6/29/2015 1:52:29 PM EDT
I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.

I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 1:56:41 PM EDT
I sure wouldn't ask for 20k.  I'd lay out your position on why you think you are underpaid without asking for a specific number and see what they offer you.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 1:56:50 PM EDT
Only when you ask for more than you are worth.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 1:57:31 PM EDT
It shouldn't hurt to ask, and you can always negotiate more vacation or something else as well.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 1:58:18 PM EDT
Shoot high, and then work to make them know they made the right decision!
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:03:41 PM EDT
The reason I was shooting so high is because the guy I'm going to ask basically told me in couple weeks I could walk into his office and ask for way more than we had been talking about( 3-4%). He is also the one the showed me what the top salaries are.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:03:46 PM EDT
Quoted:
I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.

I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?
View Quote



Is asking your boss for a 50% raise "pushing it"....no, not at all. You march right in there and demand that raise
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:06:44 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Is asking your boss for a 50% raise "pushing it"....no, not at all. You march right in there and demand that raise
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.

I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?



Is asking your boss for a 50% raise "pushing it"....no, not at all. You march right in there and demand that raise


Maybe I should have been more clear. This isn't asking for a raise at the same level I'm currently at. It would be moving into a higher position that already has set pay scales. I'm just not sure how far up on the scale I should be asking for. I'm $15,000 under what the top is for my level.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:06:45 PM EDT
This concept of "asking" for a raise is a foreign concept to me.  Does your company not have a compensation policy that addresses periodic pay increases, promotions, etc.?   If one of my employees came and asked me for a raise I'd be reverting right back to the corporate HR folks.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:12:41 PM EDT
Impossible to answer your question without much more information but, Would largely depend on the local job market including local unemployment/employment, cost of living(COLA), your personal worth to the company, the company's economic condition, etc..
Honestly, a 40%+ salary increase may be a bit excessive(granted I do not know the facts) and could be a bit of a stretch as well as seen as a bit offensive.
In most cases no matter what you think your personal worth is many companies see many employees as replaceable. Knowing well, they could potentially fill your chair by the end of the day. Not to mention replaceable at a lower salary range.
The best of luck.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:13:26 PM EDT
A buck 295
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:13:27 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This concept of "asking" for a raise is a foreign concept to me.  Does your company not have a compensation policy that addresses periodic pay increases, promotions, etc.?   If one of my employees came and asked me for a raise I'd be reverting right back to the corporate HR folks.
View Quote


i think most non-union jobs that require special skills are negotiable inside a certain range.  not every person with the same job title gets the same amount of work done or generates the same amount of revenue for the employer.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:14:23 PM EDT
I would ask for 15k and 10k would be the lowest. I learned a long time ago everyone is replaceable.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:15:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:16:27 PM EDT
Ask for $10k with 6 month evaluations to establish performance expectations and what is needed to get that last +$10k that you are not asking for prematurly.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:18:49 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Ask for $10k with 6 month evaluations to establish performance expectations and what is needed to get that last +$10k that you are not asking for prematurly.

View Quote
If he's being underpaid now he'll never see that other 10k.I bet it's a place you have to make your deal going in and raises are scarce.



 
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:21:11 PM EDT
Do you have any idea how much ch they charge for your services ? Might help in knowing what you could ask for .

Also depends on how big an asshole your boss is, whether he will get pissed if you come off as ...."greedy"

For some anecdotal evidence , my services are charged at five times what they pay me.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:21:20 PM EDT
Quoted:
I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.

I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?
View Quote



...so the highest paid position that you're planning to move into is 20k more than you make currently.


But instead, you're asking if you should ask for $25k more?
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:24:24 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Maybe I should have been more clear. This isn't asking for a raise at the same level I'm currently at. It would be moving into a higher position that already has set pay scales. I'm just not sure how far up on the scale I should be asking for. I'm $15,000 under what the top is for my level.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.



I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?






Is asking your boss for a 50% raise "pushing it"....no, not at all. You march right in there and demand that raise




Maybe I should have been more clear. This isn't asking for a raise at the same level I'm currently at. It would be moving into a higher position that already has set pay scales. I'm just not sure how far up on the scale I should be asking for. I'm $15,000 under what the top is for my level.





 
You're lucky they're letting you negotiate at all. Most of the time when you're up for a promotion they tell you what you'll be making and you either take it or leave it.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:27:00 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:





  You're lucky they're letting you negotiate at all. Most of the time when you're up for a promotion they tell you what you'll be making and you either take it or leave it.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:


Quoted:

I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.



I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?






Is asking your boss for a 50% raise "pushing it"....no, not at all. You march right in there and demand that raise




Maybe I should have been more clear. This isn't asking for a raise at the same level I'm currently at. It would be moving into a higher position that already has set pay scales. I'm just not sure how far up on the scale I should be asking for. I'm $15,000 under what the top is for my level.



  You're lucky they're letting you negotiate at all. Most of the time when you're up for a promotion they tell you what you'll be making and you either take it or leave it.

That's not true in my experience.

 
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:29:05 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



...so the highest paid position that you're planning to move into is 20k more than you make currently.


But instead, you're asking if you should ask for $25k more?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I have the opportunity to ask for a much higher raise than just a few percent, but I'm not sure what too much to ask for is. My direct supervisor is leaving the company and I have been told with that I will either be taking that position possibly or being moved up in my current position with a much larger work load. My main boss showed me a couple weeks ago what the highest pay is for my current position is and it is $15,000 more a year than I'm at now. The top pay for the supervisor role is $20,000 or more than what I make now.

I have been under paid for a while now and most of the work coming my way or that I currently do couldn't be quickly transferred to anyone else if I left. I basically have a ton of leverage and have been told that by my boss. So what do you all think, if I'm at $50,000 now, would coming in at $70,000-$75,000 be pushing it?



...so the highest paid position that you're planning to move into is 20k more than you make currently.


But instead, you're asking if you should ask for $25k more?


I know it as at least 20 more, but it could actually be more than that. My position goes up to $65,000, so I'm assuming the position supervising people like me is higher. I know the starting pay is higher. All the positions have a set pay range.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:29:20 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



That's not true in my experience.  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:



  You're lucky they're letting you negotiate at all. Most of the time when you're up for a promotion they tell you what you'll be making and you either take it or leave it.

That's not true in my experience.  
Then either you're lucky too or I'm unlucky in my corporate experience.

 
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:32:11 PM EDT
Ask for an $11k raise.

Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:34:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:34:41 PM EDT
I don't think this is really me asking for a huge raise, as it is more me asking where on the higher up pay scale I should be asking for. If the higher position has a base of $62,000 and a top of say $70-75k where should I be asking based on what I currently make? Or is my current salary irrelevant since this is a new position?
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:34:58 PM EDT
With only $5K difference between your position's max and the supervisor's max, you should figure out how much more work you're likely to see.  Do you want the supervisor position?  How does that work differ?

I'd say your limit on this is $20K and that's only if you get the supervisor job.  You're more likely to get $10-15K at most, but that shouldn't stop you from asking for $100K
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:37:46 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Impossible to answer your question without much more information but, Would largely depend on the local job market including local unemployment/employment, cost of living(COLA), your personal worth to the company, the company's economic condition, etc..
Honestly, a 40%+ salary increase may be a bit excessive(granted I do not know the facts) and could be a bit of a stretch as well as seen as a bit offensive.
In most cases no matter what you think your personal worth is many companies see many employees as replaceable. Knowing well, they could potentially fill your chair by the end of the day. Not to mention replaceable at a lower salary range.
The best of luck.
View Quote


I digress. Good luck in your new job search.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:38:29 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I don't think this is really me asking for a huge raise, as it is more me asking where on the higher up pay scale I should be asking for. If the higher position has a base of $62,000 and a top of say $70-75k where should I be asking based on what I currently make? Or is my current salary irrelevant since this is a new position?
View Quote



With those numbers , I wouldn't have a problem asking for the middle

If the top is 75k , I'd go 68 .
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:43:09 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I sure wouldn't ask for 20k.  I'd lay out your position on why you think you are underpaid without asking for a specific number and see what they offer you.
View Quote

ask for double.

you don't ask you don't get.

personally I expect you'll get  two times the work for about half of what  you  should get for doing it. After all you've shown you will. So....

now is your time to try to make it right.

Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:43:42 PM EDT
It depends on your value to the organization, your perceived value in the new position, and what salary you could reasonably command should you decide to go elsewhere.

Seriously, determine what you are worth, and move accordingly:

A few years back I re-evaluated my market value.  I told my boss I wanted a 50% raise, or "I can't guarantee how long I will remain here".  By the end of the day, I had a 10% raise, at an organization where squeezing 3-4% out of them is pushing your luck.  10% being less than 50%, however, I began looking for work.  6 weeks after I made my demand, I was sitting at the desk in my new job, with about a 65% pay increase.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:47:08 PM EDT
In my experience, asking for a raise is a gamble. The best case I ever made for a raise was flatly denied, but at another job I only asked for an inflation adjustment and they gave a 50% raise.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:48:28 PM EDT
My life experience has taught me never to start negations with a number. I would start with "as I assume my new duties and roles what will my new salary be?"  That way you have a starting point of where they are at. If they are thinking of a $2,000 raise you will look like an ahole. If they offer you $20,000 more then you are golden. Anything in the middle allows you to work out the number.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:52:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



With those numbers , I wouldn't have a problem asking for the middle

If the top is 75k , I'd go 68 .
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I don't think this is really me asking for a huge raise, as it is more me asking where on the higher up pay scale I should be asking for. If the higher position has a base of $62,000 and a top of say $70-75k where should I be asking based on what I currently make? Or is my current salary irrelevant since this is a new position?



With those numbers , I wouldn't have a problem asking for the middle

If the top is 75k , I'd go 68 .

Personally I would start off by going for 70K. Remember it's called NEGOTIATING.
Go in there with all the facts, reviews, (what you have done for your company) and stand strong.
If you are a lazy ass turd that is just there to get a pay check, and do nothing to progress the company, Take what your getting now and shut up.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 2:53:40 PM EDT
So your boss, the guy who sets your salary, is telling you that you should be asking for more money, yet he isn't telling you how much they would be willing to pay you?
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 3:09:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
So your boss, the guy who sets your salary, is telling you that you should be asking for more money, yet he isn't telling you how much they would be willing to pay you?
View Quote


Two week ago when he told me that he couldn't tell me that someone else was leaving coming up. Our discussion a couple weeks ago was about me leaving because I wasn't making enough. I had found out that a couple people that really sucked and were on the verge of being fired bore they quit were making much more than me. I was pissed and I confronted him. He told me to hold on because I would have a lot of leverage in the coming weeks. I'm holding on and am now about to see how that leverage works out.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 3:54:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My life experience has taught me never to start negations with a number. I would start with "as I assume my new duties and roles what will my new salary be?"  That way you have a starting point of where they are at. If they are thinking of a $2,000 raise you will look like an ahole. If they offer you $20,000 more then you are golden. Anything in the middle allows you to work out the number.
View Quote


sales 101..let them give the first #. that way you ahve the upper hand as this poster describes
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 4:25:18 PM EDT


Minimum wage is increasing 20% in Illinois over the next 7 years.  Factor that into your salary.  If you commit to a salary that does not keep up to this formula, you will  be paid less over the next few years.  Assume your current wage is 100% higher than a minimum wage employee, if you commit to a % higher wage now, it will be diminished as lower earners get the 20% government sanctioned increases.  Therefore reducing your worth.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 7:52:28 PM EDT
So I had somewhat of a talk today and it turns out that I need to apply for the position, they need to interview other people as well, but from the sounds of it I should have it after going through the corporate process. The process could take a couple months and I could end up pretty much doing the old persons job without the title or money until then. I did find out that it starts between 68 and 80. I might just be a little pissed if I go through all of this and they change their mind. Actually really pissed since he made it sound like it should be mine and the person that is leaving thinks it should be as well. Maybe I should just start looking elsewhere just in case.

The joys of working for an $11 billion dollar corporation.
An error occurred on the server when processing the URL. Please contact the system administrator.

If you are the system administrator please click here to find out more about this error.