Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 6/15/2009 6:00:59 PM EST
My wife and I went to look at a place we are going to rent, but we found a spot that concerns us.

The house is a bit damp from being closed up but this one spot on the ceiling, about the size of a baseball, where there appears to have been a leak in the roof (not anymore) has a black tinge to it.

A friend of mine said it's mold and that some bleach and Kilz will fix it, but we intend on having kids in this house so we want to make sure.

I have no idea about it and have never seen it in person, so any help is appreciated. We're supposed to be moving in this Saturday.





Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:02:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 6:05:16 PM EST by wildearp]
You need to know that the source is under control. I would open that wall. Have a licensed mold removal technician provide an estimate and insist it is done correctly. This will be a huge bargaining chip in the price of the house, or it could be a deal killer. What you don't see may be quite extensive. Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.

I had black mold inside my exterior wall due to a shower leak. I masked and gloved up, bleached it up, and removed and bagged it all under positive ventilation.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:21:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.


That's my thing. I'm not even sure it's mold. I think it just may be a stain, but he says he thinks it mold. There's no fuzzy shit on the surface, the only thing "moldy" is the color.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:33:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
You need to know that the source is under control. I would open that wall. Have a licensed mold removal technician provide an estimate and insist it is done correctly. This will be a huge bargaining chip in the price of the house, or it could be a deal killer. What you don't see may be quite extensive. Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.

I had black mold inside my exterior wall due to a shower leak. I masked and gloved up, bleached it up, and removed and bagged it all under positive ventilation.


Fuck that. Do not open the wall.

Have a licensed mold removal company come in and open the wall - they will hang plastic tarps to insure that the area is isolated and the mold cannot go airborne and contaminate the rest of the house.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:34:57 PM EST
87 grams
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:35:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By shocktrp:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
You need to know that the source is under control. I would open that wall. Have a licensed mold removal technician provide an estimate and insist it is done correctly. This will be a huge bargaining chip in the price of the house, or it could be a deal killer. What you don't see may be quite extensive. Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.

I had black mold inside my exterior wall due to a shower leak. I masked and gloved up, bleached it up, and removed and bagged it all under positive ventilation.


Fuck that. Do not open the wall.

Have a licensed mold removal company come in and open the wall - they will hang plastic tarps to insure that the area is isolated and the mold cannot go airborne and contaminate the rest of the house.





This is what I am worried about.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:36:00 PM EST
If you cure the water problem the mold will not grow again. Make sure it stays dry, bleach and kilz. Its all you need. If it is still getting wet then nothing will work.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:37:04 PM EST
Not sure... what's it taste like?





Seriously, like the other guys said, a professional opinion is warranted.

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:38:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
Originally Posted By shocktrp:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
You need to know that the source is under control. I would open that wall. Have a licensed mold removal technician provide an estimate and insist it is done correctly. This will be a huge bargaining chip in the price of the house, or it could be a deal killer. What you don't see may be quite extensive. Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.

I had black mold inside my exterior wall due to a shower leak. I masked and gloved up, bleached it up, and removed and bagged it all under positive ventilation.


Fuck that. Do not open the wall.

Have a licensed mold removal company come in and open the wall - they will hang plastic tarps to insure that the area is isolated and the mold cannot go airborne and contaminate the rest of the house.





This is what I am worried about.



I wouldnt worry about it. It would have to be wet somewhere else for it to grow. "licensed mold removal company" = fuck you in the ass
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 6:52:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
If you cure the water problem the mold will not grow again. Make sure it stays dry, bleach and kilz. Its all you need. If it is still getting wet then nothing will work.


Yes and no.

No you don't just need to kill the mold. Industry standards of practice say it MUST be removed. Mold spores can cause health issues no matter if they are capable of growth, actually growing, or neither. The spore itself may have a micotoxin on it that the mold grows/uses to compete with other molds for dominance in a certain location. That would be a toxigenic mold. Even if it isn't toxigenic ALL molds can be allergenic and cause problems such as asthma etc. All mold no matter what type should be removed. If possible by a certified remediation company. In the OP's case that would mean removal and replacement of drywall and whatever else they find during inspection. Also possible mold removal from structural wood by soda blasting. Products such as Kilz only encapsulate the mold and this is not done except in cases where you can't get to it.

Yes you need to fix the moisture intrusion problem in order to keep the mold from growing. Mold will not grow without moisture.

While the photo makes it appear to be a minor problem, this is a issue that should be cleared up before you move in. This sort of stuff may be minor now but can quickly evolve into a expensive problem down the road. I work for a laboratory and deal with testing for molds on a routine basis.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:00:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
My wife and I went to look at a place we are going to rent, but we found a spot that concerns us.

The house is a bit damp from being closed up but this one spot on the ceiling, about the size of a baseball, where there appears to have been a leak in the roof (not anymore) has a black tinge to it.

A friend of mine said it's mold and that some bleach and Kilz will fix it, but we intend on having kids in this house so we want to make sure.

I have no idea about it and have never seen it in person, so any help is appreciated. We're supposed to be moving in this Saturday.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/PantherArms/mold.jpg





I'd be very suspect. I'm thinking since you want to rent the place, the owner tried to cover something up, but the problem is so big that it can't be covered. Or they're lazy. Since you want to rent, why not find another location, since I doubt the owner would want to tear their place up?
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:07:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By yumbeef:
Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
My wife and I went to look at a place we are going to rent, but we found a spot that concerns us.

The house is a bit damp from being closed up but this one spot on the ceiling, about the size of a baseball, where there appears to have been a leak in the roof (not anymore) has a black tinge to it.

A friend of mine said it's mold and that some bleach and Kilz will fix it, but we intend on having kids in this house so we want to make sure.

I have no idea about it and have never seen it in person, so any help is appreciated. We're supposed to be moving in this Saturday.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/PantherArms/mold.jpg





I'd be very suspect. I'm thinking since you want to rent the place, the owner tried to cover something up, but the problem is so big that it can't be covered. Or they're lazy. Since you want to rent, why not find another location, since I doubt the owner would want to tear their place up?


Cause we have to be out by the end of the month and we're supposed to move Saturday.

This has been a huge clusterfuck. Apparently, it's not done being a clusterfuck.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:09:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
If you cure the water problem the mold will not grow again. Make sure it stays dry, bleach and kilz. Its all you need. If it is still getting wet then nothing will work.


This,

and what is the crazy mold scare?
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:09:53 PM EST
I don't know about dangerous, but my wife used to cough relentlessly before going to sleep. When I remodeled the hall and pulled up the carpet there was about a foot square of it in the wood floor in front of the water tank closet. I scrubbed it all with bleach and she hasn't coughed at bedtime since.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:10:53 PM EST

Looks like a water stain from a previous leak. But to be on the safe side spray with 50 percent Clorox and 50 percent water on the outside initially. Let it sit for about an hour. Then peel off the layer of texture and paper of the drywall. If you still see the dark color on the actual drywall material which is gypsum, spray it again with the solution and let it sit for the same amount of time. The trick is not to let the mold spores airborne. Do drape around the affected area with plastic to contain any loose material. Wear a half mask repirator and eye protection.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:27:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 7:32:07 PM EST by VaFarmBoy]
Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Honestly, it really doesn't look too bad, but it is not worth the risk. It really appears to be more of a stain due to a ceiling leak, possibly no mold at all.


That's my thing. I'm not even sure it's mold. I think it just may be a stain, but he says he thinks it mold. There's no fuzzy shit on the surface, the only thing "moldy" is the color.


Take a Q-Tip, dab it in straight bleach, and touch it to the black area. If the color lightens and it goes away where you dabbed it, it is mold. If it does not, it is not mold. It is possible that it is mold on the surface from poor ventilation in a bathroom, or there is insulation missing in the celing at that spot. It is also entirely possible that you will find mold on the other side, and if so, probably worse than this visible spot. If so, a water leak is most likely the culprit. You definitely want this checked out if your intial Q-Tip test says it is mold. Mold can make you itch when in the house, to cause breathing problems, to actually killing you if it is bad enough.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:28:43 PM EST
I figure I need to toss in my $.02 worth.

I've done some poking around on the 'net regarding this, and the consensus is that bleach, even "undiluted" is still a very weak solution that's mostly water. Adding water = adding to the mold problem.

If you insist on doing it yourself, just use a very little amount, and on the affected area only. Spraying all around the area with what's mostly water just adds to the problem.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:31:11 PM EST
As long as the water source has been repaired not really an issue. Could be more growing above the ceiling. By industry standards, removal inside a containment is not warranted unless the growth is larger than 10 sf.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 7:47:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By kevinb120:
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
If you cure the water problem the mold will not grow again. Make sure it stays dry, bleach and kilz. Its all you need. If it is still getting wet then nothing will work.


This,

and what is the crazy mold scare?


Google up Jay Leno and mold lawsuit.

I saw them demo an entire apartment building in my previous hometown due to black mold.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:45:02 PM EST
black mold is no big deal at all, do not be alaramed.

Just use bleach to clean it up.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:00:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 9:03:59 PM EST by scottfire1957]
It's really too bad that something like this, that's been around for years, has nothing about it on the intarwebs with definitive information for remediation or sources for same.

I would have thought I could have discovered a veritable cornucopia of information about mold, black mold etc. etc., but without looking myself, I guess I'm incorrect.


ETA: There is probably nobody in the yellow pages that can help either. No bother looking there either.


ETA: Renting? Get something in the dadgum contract, get it fixed or whatever.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:06:51 PM EST
Bleach it...see if it lightens.

If you were single I'd say deal with it and kill it. And you should be okay. If you have a family, and may have a child. I'd walk away on GP.


It's generally easily handled early on...but....with a family. No.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:18:16 PM EST
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:34:37 PM EST
Black mold is SO several years old, and evidently NOT the health threat that it was first imagined to be, especially by the "NEWS MEDIA!"

Really. Grab a new headline.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:45:28 PM EST
I had something like that on my bathroom ceiling also. A guy I used to work with did mold testing as a part time gig. He came over and tested and it turns out it wasn't the evil black mold after all. Cleaned it with some bleach and it never came back. The initial mold test should cost between $90 and $150 depending on where you are.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 9:58:00 PM EST
honestly. Cut it out and spray the fuck out of the insides with 100% chlorine bleach. Promise you nothing will grow. Patch up the sheetrock. repaint :)
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 10:00:53 PM EST
Remember... the famed "black mold" is Stachybotrys spp. and it requires moisture to grow. Take away the water, and you'll take care of the mold problem (that is, if you're really that worried about it). If you're demo'ing the area, wear a respirator and hang plastic... but you should be doing than anyway, just to keep the dust out of your lungs, and out of the rest of the house. You don't want to inhale massive quantities of powdered mold and gypsum... that CAN be a problem. The occasional spore shouldn't be a big deal if you're not allergic.

Some molds are toxigenic (they produce various mycotoxins), and you wouldn't want to ingest a large amount. Ergotism (also called Saint Anthony's Fire) is a mold-induced illness from antiquity. It's produced by the Claviceps purpurea species of fungus. It grows on certain improperly-stored grains, and isn't something you'd want to experience.

A few airborne spores shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if you're not living in a damp cave (or a serious "sick building" domicile). You already inhale mold spores every single day... everybody does.

Unless your house is truly damp and rotting around you, a little mildew in your bathroom grout does not constitute a mold emergency. Get some bleach.


Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:15:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Remember... the famed "black mold" is Stachybotrys spp. and it requires moisture to grow. Take away the water, and you'll take care of the mold problem (that is, if you're really that worried about it). If you're demo'ing the area, wear a respirator and hang plastic... but you should be doing than anyway, just to keep the dust out of your lungs, and out of the rest of the house. You don't want to inhale massive quantities of powdered mold and gypsum... that CAN be a problem. The occasional spore shouldn't be a big deal if you're not allergic.

Some molds are toxigenic (they produce various mycotoxins), and you wouldn't want to ingest a large amount. Ergotism (also called Saint Anthony's Fire) is a mold-induced illness from antiquity. It's produced by the Claviceps purpurea species of fungus. It grows on certain improperly-stored grains, and isn't something you'd want to experience.

A few airborne spores shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if you're not living in a damp cave (or a serious "sick building" domicile). You already inhale mold spores every single day... everybody does.

Unless your house is truly damp and rotting around you, a little mildew in your bathroom grout does not constitute a mold emergency. Get some bleach.




The above is wise advice.

I doubt it is Stachybotrys though as it only grows were it is really really wet. Like standing water wet. More likely a common Aspergillus/Penicillium-type mold. I don't know who said it above, but the industry standard is that it is usually homeowner remediatable if under 10 sq ft. But you are renting so just make the landlord fix the leak, remove/replace the drywall and move on with your life.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:19:23 AM EST
Much like every snake in the water is called a Moc, every piece of mold is assumed to be the dreaded type of toxic mold. In most cases it's not. Fix the leak, don't worry too much...

If you are allergic to mold spores, you are going to have issues living anywhere but AZ.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:33:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02


I have seen damage with my asthmatic son who is severely allergic to mold. He ended up with pneumonia twice documented to being due to mold.

Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:41:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02


I have seen damage with my asthmatic son who is severely allergic to mold. He ended up with pneumonia twice documented to being due to mold.



Your son is allergic to mold... different kettle of fish. Asthmatics are commonly atopic, and allergic to all sorts of things.

Did they actually culture the mold out of his lungs? If not, how did they determine that his pneumonia was due to mold? Aspergillus causes pulmonary disease, but usually only in people with severe cavitary tuberculosis, HIV+ patients, and the like.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:49:32 AM EST
Make sure the water source is stopped.
Set up a negative air containment chamber.
Cut the stain out.
Inspect for visible mold growth.
Physically remove all mold affected drywall.
Sand / wire brush all affected framing.
Treat all affected areas with an anti microbial agent
Dry thoroughly
Replace drywall.


Bleach is not best choice. Sporiciden would be much better.

$2000.00 to $4000.00 if I do it.
Contact an Environmental Hygienist for testing and recommendations.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:57:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02


I have seen damage with my asthmatic son who is severely allergic to mold. He ended up with pneumonia twice documented to being due to mold.



Your son is allergic to mold... different kettle of fish. Asthmatics are commonly atopic, and allergic to all sorts of things.

Did they actually culture the mold out of his lungs? If not, how did they determine that his pneumonia was due to mold? Aspergillus causes pulmonary disease, but usually only in people with severe cavitary tuberculosis, HIV+ patients, and the like.

The only cultures they did were sputum cultures and blood cultures. Chest x-rays of course. I don't remember the name of the diagnosis one of the times, but one of the other times was mycoplasma. The doc said it was related to mold exposure. He just recently got over a different type of pneumonia (third time of pneumonia) but that was due to being intubated for tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy. The first 2 times he had pneumonia he was around 2-3 years old.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:23:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02


I have seen damage with my asthmatic son who is severely allergic to mold. He ended up with pneumonia twice documented to being due to mold.



Your son is allergic to mold... different kettle of fish. Asthmatics are commonly atopic, and allergic to all sorts of things.

Did they actually culture the mold out of his lungs? If not, how did they determine that his pneumonia was due to mold? Aspergillus causes pulmonary disease, but usually only in people with severe cavitary tuberculosis, HIV+ patients, and the like.

The only cultures they did were sputum cultures and blood cultures. Chest x-rays of course. I don't remember the name of the diagnosis one of the times, but one of the other times was mycoplasma. The doc said it was related to mold exposure. He just recently got over a different type of pneumonia (third time of pneumonia) but that was due to being intubated for tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy. The first 2 times he had pneumonia he was around 2-3 years old.


Mycoplasma is a common organism in kids... almost everybody gets it at one time or another. I wouldn't sweat that one.

What he may have been inferring is that the asthma exacerbations (from the mold) set your son up for opportunistic pneumonias of a more conventional sort. Once you've got the inflammation, bronchospasm, impaired mucus clearance and other pulmonary toilet issues going, it's easier for a bonafide infection to set up. It's not necessarily that the infection itself is from the mold.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:30:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 7:31:23 AM EST by kraftwerk]
What's on the other side of the affected drywall? Attic space? Is there a window above there on the next floor?
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 7:35:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Remember... the famed "black mold" is Stachybotrys spp. and it requires moisture to grow. Take away the water, and you'll take care of the mold problem (that is, if you're really that worried about it). If you're demo'ing the area, wear a respirator and hang plastic... but you should be doing than anyway, just to keep the dust out of your lungs, and out of the rest of the house. You don't want to inhale massive quantities of powdered mold and gypsum... that CAN be a problem. The occasional spore shouldn't be a big deal if you're not allergic.

Some molds are toxigenic (they produce various mycotoxins), and you wouldn't want to ingest a large amount. Ergotism (also called Saint Anthony's Fire) is a mold-induced illness from antiquity. It's produced by the Claviceps purpurea species of fungus. It grows on certain improperly-stored grains, and isn't something you'd want to experience.

A few airborne spores shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if you're not living in a damp cave (or a serious "sick building" domicile). You already inhale mold spores every single day... everybody does.

Unless your house is truly damp and rotting around you, a little mildew in your bathroom grout does not constitute a mold emergency. Get some bleach.




Thank you for that breath of common sense!
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:07:11 AM EST
Originally Posted By kraftwerk:
What's on the other side of the affected drywall? Attic space? Is there a window above there on the next floor?


There's attic space above it. My BIL said to stick a clothes hanger through it and go up top, find the hangar, and pull back the insulation. If the spot is fuzzy and larger than 1 ft diameter, then worry about it. Otherwise, shoot it with bleach and Kilz: repaint.

I think thats the general consensus I'm getting here too.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:10:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 8:14:00 AM EST by PantherArms762]
Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Remember... the famed "black mold" is Stachybotrys spp. and it requires moisture to grow. Take away the water, and you'll take care of the mold problem (that is, if you're really that worried about it). If you're demo'ing the area, wear a respirator and hang plastic... but you should be doing than anyway, just to keep the dust out of your lungs, and out of the rest of the house. You don't want to inhale massive quantities of powdered mold and gypsum... that CAN be a problem. The occasional spore shouldn't be a big deal if you're not allergic.

Some molds are toxigenic (they produce various mycotoxins), and you wouldn't want to ingest a large amount. Ergotism (also called Saint Anthony's Fire) is a mold-induced illness from antiquity. It's produced by the Claviceps purpurea species of fungus. It grows on certain improperly-stored grains, and isn't something you'd want to experience.

A few airborne spores shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if you're not living in a damp cave (or a serious "sick building" domicile). You already inhale mold spores every single day... everybody does.

Unless your house is truly damp and rotting around you, a little mildew in your bathroom grout does not constitute a mold emergency. Get some bleach.




Thanks TGM. in reality I'm not really that worried about it. But we are getting ready to start trying for kids and I don't want the baby or my pregnant wife in that shit.

I may ask about an 8 month lease and just GTFO and buy something. We have been fucked around on two houses and are coming up on move day so I really have my dick in a ringer to make this work.

Our place is already rented so we have to be out by the end of the month or we're homeless.

ETA: Seriously, if this shit is bad I am going to freak the fuck out and have a mental breakdown.

Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:15:26 AM EST
Ask the English Seriously have any of you been to England, I think that shit is there notional plant.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:16:09 AM EST
Am I the only one who thought this was another Obama thread?
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 9:49:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
Originally Posted By ihatespngbob:

Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
I've had people who come into the ER complaining of the "black mold," combined with any number of vague, non-specific complaints/maladies. They're always angry about it, and wanting me to write a letter about its dangers so they can pressure/sue their landlord. They're utterly convinced that the mold spores are killing them.

I've never seen a single serious medical illness from this feared scourge. I get the distinct impression that the dangers of "black mold" are vastly overblown, particularly if you're not frankly allergic to it. It smacks of a prime "money making opportunity," and not in a good way.

Just my $.02


I have seen damage with my asthmatic son who is severely allergic to mold. He ended up with pneumonia twice documented to being due to mold.



Your son is allergic to mold... different kettle of fish. Asthmatics are commonly atopic, and allergic to all sorts of things.

Did they actually culture the mold out of his lungs? If not, how did they determine that his pneumonia was due to mold? Aspergillus causes pulmonary disease, but usually only in people with severe cavitary tuberculosis, HIV+ patients, and the like.

The only cultures they did were sputum cultures and blood cultures. Chest x-rays of course. I don't remember the name of the diagnosis one of the times, but one of the other times was mycoplasma. The doc said it was related to mold exposure. He just recently got over a different type of pneumonia (third time of pneumonia) but that was due to being intubated for tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy. The first 2 times he had pneumonia he was around 2-3 years old.


Mycoplasma is a common organism in kids... almost everybody gets it at one time or another. I wouldn't sweat that one.

What he may have been inferring is that the asthma exacerbations (from the mold) set your son up for opportunistic pneumonias of a more conventional sort. Once you've got the inflammation, bronchospasm, impaired mucus clearance and other pulmonary toilet issues going, it's easier for a bonafide infection to set up. It's not necessarily that the infection itself is from the mold.

That could be quite possible.

Top Top