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Posted: 4/23/2016 12:47:26 PM EDT
Two people who nobody fucked with were licensed electricians and welders, how did you guys learn to weld, OJT, school, dad???
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 12:52:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 12:56:25 PM EDT
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:01:29 PM EDT
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Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


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Any shipyard work? I did not mean licensed welders, just electricians
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:07:28 PM EDT
I don't know where the text part went on my post above.
The welders are half in half. Some took a trades course at the local college and got their certifications.The others have been around it their whole lives. Others started out as welders helpers and worked their way up.
Electricians have all hired on as helpers and worked their into the journeyman and masters licence.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:14:23 PM EDT
I make 30 and change for relining haul truck beds and loader buckets and a few other items.
Most people that claim they are welders don't know shit. We run a lot of 1/16 nickel wire at roughly 30 volts and around 400 inches a minute.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:30:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:31:21 PM EDT


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Quoted:



No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.





I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  





Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.





Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.
View Quote
i must be overcharging

 










by $60/hr


 



ETA: my biggest jobs were mostly welding custom bridges. did a 60 ft. bridge made from 8" I's arched 30" inches. jigged it up in the yard, shot in the corners and went to town. picked it up with a crane, set it on a flatbed semi and shipped it out. did a 216' ft. suspension bridge design/build project for a Boy Scout camp. had to demo a bridge built by the WPA in the 30's, run new cables and install the new bridge.all while hanging from cables 40 ft in the air. that one was fun. other smaller jobs when i owned an ornamental shop. i charged and still charge $75/hr when i fire up a welder, although i'm mostly retired now.







Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:37:28 PM EDT
I got a job as a saw operator when I was 21, (1998).
I saved the drops and practiced welding on my breaks or on down time.
The boss took notice and hired a new saw guy and put me in a welding position.

Now, I am more of a set up welder than a wire pourer.
One of the advantages of learning the skill in job shops as opposed to a production shop.

Biggest job I did were two 55 ton vapor phase tanks for processing EHV transformer cores.
The design and prints were German.
What a pain in the ass!

Now I make 55k building internal weldments for transformers.
The biggest being only 2 tons.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:38:59 PM EDT
I wouldn't exactly call it a dead end job, if you're a pipe fitter.  Even moreso if you are a union pipe fitter.

I would imagine that here in the St. Louis area, journeyman pipe fitter scale is somewhere between 30 and 40 bucks an hour with a benefits package somewhere between 10 and 20 dollars an hour.

Where you make your money at is in the overtime.  With the power houses and refineries around here, if they go down for whatever reason, they aren't making money.  So they throw man hours at it until they can start back up again.

So just like any other construction job, you are working yourself out of a job.

It would be better if you had a back up gig, farming, or fabing up your own roll cages.

Plan on being a traveler or a "roadwhore".

I was a millwright, and had just my 3G certification.

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:41:55 PM EDT
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For you fine chaps:

$36 steel lower - needs your skills.
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WTF. Why??????????????
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 1:46:42 PM EDT
I'm not a welder by trade but when I was young my best friends dad owned a shop that build custom trailers and trucks.  They stuck me with an older guy that taught me how and I was welding D rings on their trailers for tie downs by the time I was 14.  I only did it for one summer but thought I was killing it making $10 and hour!  Come to find out we weren't legally allowed to work there so he paid us cash and told us to keep it quite.  Still to this day the work I did in that shop is still with me.  I ended up working in their electronics shop which made me want to become an Electrical Engineer and that's where I am now.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:01:20 PM EDT
Welder by circumstance.  Once the box fell off of my dad's dump truck and I had to fabricate new beams and rails.  And hinges.  That would be the "biggest" job for me
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:16:56 PM EDT
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Quoted:


WTF. Why??????????????
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Quoted:
Quoted:  For you fine chaps:

$36 steel lower - needs your skills.


WTF. Why??????????????


Because superglue doesn't work.  

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_3_4/647105_Steel_AR_flats_from_the_Flat_Spot.html
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 3:38:44 PM EDT
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Quoted:
i must be overcharging  



by $60/hr
 

ETA: my biggest jobs were mostly welding custom bridges. did a 60 ft. bridge made from 8" I's arched 30" inches. jigged it up in the yard, shot in the corners and went to town. picked it up with a crane, set it on a flatbed semi and shipped it out. did a 216' ft. suspension bridge design/build project for a Boy Scout camp. had to demo a bridge built by the WPA in the 30's, run new cables and install the new bridge.all while hanging from cables 40 ft in the air. that one was fun. other smaller jobs when i owned an ornamental shop. i charged and still charge $75/hr when i fire up a welder, although i'm mostly retired now.
http://i1282.photobucket.com/albums/a533/rwilkins01/20121126_143501_zpsk7jbvyej.jpg


http://i1282.photobucket.com/albums/a533/rwilkins01/20130128_154129_zpsisb2ucvo.jpg
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Quoted:
Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


i must be overcharging  



by $60/hr
 

ETA: my biggest jobs were mostly welding custom bridges. did a 60 ft. bridge made from 8" I's arched 30" inches. jigged it up in the yard, shot in the corners and went to town. picked it up with a crane, set it on a flatbed semi and shipped it out. did a 216' ft. suspension bridge design/build project for a Boy Scout camp. had to demo a bridge built by the WPA in the 30's, run new cables and install the new bridge.all while hanging from cables 40 ft in the air. that one was fun. other smaller jobs when i owned an ornamental shop. i charged and still charge $75/hr when i fire up a welder, although i'm mostly retired now.
http://i1282.photobucket.com/albums/a533/rwilkins01/20121126_143501_zpsk7jbvyej.jpg


http://i1282.photobucket.com/albums/a533/rwilkins01/20130128_154129_zpsisb2ucvo.jpg
Holy cow!
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 4:06:02 PM EDT
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 4:14:25 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
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Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 4:38:35 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money
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Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money


I'm not sure how you mean that.  My shop works safely, but metal will win over human flesh every time.  We do what we can to prevent injuries, as insurance premiums for a fab shop can be pricey and nobody wants to get hurt obviously.  Everyone looks out for each other as well.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:06:42 PM EDT
went to school. havent done any big jobs. just days and days of 1000's of brackets to rods. in jigs.  not hard but mind numbing.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:46:42 PM EDT
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went to school. havent done any big jobs. just days and days of 1000's of brackets to rods. in jigs.  not hard but mind numbing.
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If you're in the northern part of our state, we're currently hiring. If you're looking.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:57:41 PM EDT
I went to school - but hobby welded doing 4x4 stuff previously.
I'm D1.1 certified, through WABO here in WA - in Stick, Flux, Solid Wire & Tig, Vertical up & Overhead.
Ran a Saw for awhile at a steel mill, making casings - boring as fawk - but we made some huge 20"x100" casings - I did the long seams on them.
Worked at a fab shop hand welding & did a big chunk of the structural, for the new student center, at the school I learned to weld at. That was cool.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:09:24 PM EDT
Mid 20s and I'm a welding engineer with a BS in welding engineering. Started out thinking I wanted to be a welder but the hot, dirty work got old fast so I kept going with my education. I've had plenty of summer jobs and side jobs welding. I've done everything from repair work in the field to production to stainless process piping which paid the most, 21/HR working for a company unless I got on those rare jobs that paid prevailing wage. If I would have stuck with it I could have gotten on that crew eventually but like I said, it wasn't for me.

I make roughly 75k in a town where the cost of living is next to nothing. Spend 40% of my day in my air conditioned office doing design work (fixtures, consulting for the design department) and the rest on the floor involved in welding and fab. I've got college friends doing similar jobs making over 100k. Keep in mind this is at age 25, managers make even more and it opens the door to the executive world (operations) if you've got a good head on your shoulders.

If you've got a son or daughter that has a hands on attitude, decent math smarts, and doesn't want to be stuck in their home town for the rest of their life. I recommend this path.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:12:37 PM EDT
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I'm not sure how you mean that.  My shop works safely, but metal will win over human flesh every time.  We do what we can to prevent injuries, as insurance premiums for a fab shop can be pricey and nobody wants to get hurt obviously.  Everyone looks out for each other as well.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money


I'm not sure how you mean that.  My shop works safely, but metal will win over human flesh every time.  We do what we can to prevent injuries, as insurance premiums for a fab shop can be pricey and nobody wants to get hurt obviously.  Everyone looks out for each other as well.

Safety inspectors who are welders is what I mean, they make good change just inspecting welds. I can't spell Pasciagula, the shipyard, a friend of mine goes inside boats just to inspect welds
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:15:19 PM EDT

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Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money

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Quoted:



Quoted:

I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  

I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,



Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money





Buddy of mine went from being a paid firefighter to a safety officer for a construction company. For as great as being a fireman is, safety pays way more $$$.



 

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:15:25 PM EDT
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If you're in the northern part of our state, we're currently hiring. If you're looking.
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Quoted:
went to school. havent done any big jobs. just days and days of 1000's of brackets to rods. in jigs.  not hard but mind numbing.


If you're in the northern part of our state, we're currently hiring. If you're looking.
If you get hired, buy me a cheesesteak
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:15:36 PM EDT
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Quoted:

Safety inspectors who are welders is what I mean, they make good change just inspecting welds. I can't spell Pasciagula, the shipyard, a friend of mine goes inside boats just to inspect welds
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money


I'm not sure how you mean that.  My shop works safely, but metal will win over human flesh every time.  We do what we can to prevent injuries, as insurance premiums for a fab shop can be pricey and nobody wants to get hurt obviously.  Everyone looks out for each other as well.

Safety inspectors who are welders is what I mean, they make good change just inspecting welds. I can't spell Pasciagula, the shipyard, a friend of mine goes inside boats just to inspect welds


So he's a CWI. Really that has nothing to do with safety at all.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:16:45 PM EDT
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Quoted:



Buddy of mine went from being a paid firefighter to a safety officer for a construction company. For as great as being a fireman is, safety pays way more $$$.

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Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money



Buddy of mine went from being a paid firefighter to a safety officer for a construction company. For as great as being a fireman is, safety pays way more $$$.



Yeah because everyone hates you for making them do shit they don't want to do.

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:40:15 PM EDT
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Safety inspectors who are welders is what I mean, they make good change just inspecting welds. I can't spell Pasciagula, the shipyard, a friend of mine goes inside boats just to inspect welds
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been in the business for 26 years now.  Learned on the job mostly, but had good mentors over the years.  
I hold D1.1 and D1.6 certs, but don't fab/weld anymore.  Now I'm on the inspection side of things,

Biggest single job was a paint curing oven for John Deere that took 14 flatbeds to ship last fall.  Sumbitch was like 340 ft. long once assembled on site.
Welders tell me safety is where it's at, big money


I'm not sure how you mean that.  My shop works safely, but metal will win over human flesh every time.  We do what we can to prevent injuries, as insurance premiums for a fab shop can be pricey and nobody wants to get hurt obviously.  Everyone looks out for each other as well.

Safety inspectors who are welders is what I mean, they make good change just inspecting welds. I can't spell Pasciagula, the shipyard, a friend of mine goes inside boats just to inspect welds


Ahh, ok. I'm responsible for everything that leaves my shop, dimensionally correct, complete weld quality inspection etc. A little bit of CWI work here and there, but if a customer wants me to do a full D1.1 on a job, the labor rate goes up to $300/hr plus, depending on what they need. It hardly ever comes up for that reason. Safety is a given, Weld inspection and testing isn't safety based, so I was confused.  
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:09:55 PM EDT

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went to school. havent done any big jobs. just days and days of 1000's of brackets to rods. in jigs.  not hard but mind numbing.
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That's basically my experience. I was in a tough spot and came across a good opportunity for a weld school at just the right time, is how I got into it.   Sounds like I have the same kind of factory production job, it's repetitive but easy. There isn't any realistic potential for advancement and it only pays $20/hr which isn't that great for my area. But I get decent benefits and it's a stable job.

 



I would like to move on to something better, that pays more and is more mentally challenging. But lack of time and money for additional schooling is an issue.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:47:06 PM EDT
Maintenance mechanic by trade, took classes in stick and oxy/ace welding.  Taught myself to TIG and MIG.  I've done some pretty neat stuff, not nearly as big as the bridges, pipefitters and such, though.  Design and fabrication used to be a big part of my job, not so much any more.  Mostly repair stuff now--I'm the only one left who can TIG worth a darn, especieally with aluminum and stainless.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:16:29 PM EDT
I often hoist/set for iron workers in NYC (Local 40, 580, 361) they're always hurting for licensed welders (NYC requires a license, NY state may as well). I know local 40 (structural iron workers) make over $50/hr and have an amazing benefit package of over $70/hr.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:45:05 PM EDT
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I often hoist/set for iron workers in NYC (Local 40, 580, 361) they're always hurting for licensed welders (NYC requires a license, NY state may as well). I know local 40 (structural iron workers) make over $50/hr and have an amazing benefit package of over $70/hr.
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Man, I always wanted to learn, I regret not learning
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:50:32 PM EDT


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No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.





I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  





Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.





Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.
View Quote
this




 
 
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:53:32 PM EDT
I learned on my own and just do side jobs for friends and the biggest project was welding the frame together on my first motorcycle, it was also probably the best welds I've ever done

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:59:44 PM EDT


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this
   
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Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


this
   


Nah.
It's regional.
A good fit up guy can make $20+ an hour around here.

I expect demand for skilled welders and fitter to increase as the baby boomers retire.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:06:53 PM EDT
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Quoted:




Nah.
It's regional.
A good fit up guy can make $20+ an hour around here.

I expect demand for skilled welders and fitter to increase as the baby boomers retire.
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Quoted:


Quoted:
Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


this
   


Nah.
It's regional.
A good fit up guy can make $20+ an hour around here.

I expect demand for skilled welders and fitter to increase as the baby boomers retire.


Back in January 2005, the carpenter's (millwright) union sent me to Vegas for a week to learn natural gas turbines.  I went around and asked people their  birth year.  The average age ended up being 43.  That was 11 years ago.  So they'd be about 54 now with a lot of them looking to retire either right now or in 5 to 10 years.

For pipefitters, who the fuck wants to be climbing around on scaffold when they're 55 or 60.  


Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:15:41 PM EDT
I'm an AWS certified welder. I started when I began working on industrial equipment. I like fabricating. I have done a lot of work on my Jeep including body work and roll cage fabrication. I have fabricated shelving that will hold 3600lbs. per shelf for steel plates used in hand fabricating venturi. I can also weld aluminum with a spool gun or tig. I used to do machine work as well. I am a mechanic by trade on Volvo CE. I have welded hauler beds, buckets and hammer housings. I think the biggest job would be the installation of thumbs on excavators especially the large ones.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:27:42 PM EDT
I've been welding since 1979.

The USAF trained me and certified me in TIG on several different alloys for manned flight hardware.

Since then I've welded in the oil patch, construction, fabrication, ornamental iron, and aerospace.

I've worked on the United States Space Shuttle External Tank for Lockheed Martin, Boeings Delta II and Delta IV, Mitsubishis liquid oxygen tanks for their space program, the ARES program for the N.A.S.A., and currently for Boeing on the SLS program.

VPPAW, GTAW, GMAW, Self Reacting Friction Stir, Conventional Friction Stir, and Plug Weld Friction Stir.

What do you want to know?

eta, this is the biggest moveable object that I've welded on.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:33:44 PM EDT
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I've been welding since 1979.

The USAF trained me and certified me in TIG on several different alloys for manned flight hardware.

Since then I've welded in the oil patch, construction, fabrication, ornamental iron, and aerospace.

I've worked on the United States Space Shuttle External Tank for Lockheed Martin, Boeings Delta II and Delta IV, Mitsubishis liquid oxygen tanks for their space program, the ARES program for the N.A.S.A., and currently for Boeing on the SLS program.

VPPAW, GTAW, GMAW, Self Reacting Friction Stir, Conventional Friction Stir, and Plug Weld Friction Stir.

What do you want to know?

eta, this is the biggest moveable object that I've welded on.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Externaltank.jpg
View Quote


What is friction stir?

Nevermind I wiki'ed it that's some neat shit!
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:42:10 PM EDT
Solid State Welding vs the more traditional Fusion Welding. The metal is brought to a plasticized state with friction and stirred together as the weld tool travels along the joint.

At about 3 minutes into this video is one of the guys that I work with, explaining the process.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:44:36 PM EDT
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Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.


View Quote

That is funny... I personally know welders who work from a shop that is less than 20 miles from their homes that weld steam and combustion turbine buckets that are easily making $100k+ a year. These are extremely smart and talented guys that are incredible at what they do. These guys are not your average "boiler makers" though...
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:46:34 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I've been welding since 1979.

The USAF trained me and certified me in TIG on several different alloys for manned flight hardware.

Since then I've welded in the oil patch, construction, fabrication, ornamental iron, and aerospace.

I've worked on the United States Space Shuttle External Tank for Lockheed Martin, Boeings Delta II and Delta IV, Mitsubishis liquid oxygen tanks for their space program, the ARES program for the N.A.S.A., and currently for Boeing on the SLS program.

VPPAW, GTAW, GMAW, Self Reacting Friction Stir, Conventional Friction Stir, and Plug Weld Friction Stir.

What do you want to know?

eta, this is the biggest moveable object that I've welded on.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Externaltank.jpg
View Quote

I am going to go out on a limb and say you might be making slightly more than the $12-15 an hour as a previous poster stated......
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:47:30 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I am going to go out on a limb and say you might be making slightly more than the $12-15 an hour as a previous poster stated......
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I've been welding since 1979.

The USAF trained me and certified me in TIG on several different alloys for manned flight hardware.

Since then I've welded in the oil patch, construction, fabrication, ornamental iron, and aerospace.

I've worked on the United States Space Shuttle External Tank for Lockheed Martin, Boeings Delta II and Delta IV, Mitsubishis liquid oxygen tanks for their space program, the ARES program for the N.A.S.A., and currently for Boeing on the SLS program.

VPPAW, GTAW, GMAW, Self Reacting Friction Stir, Conventional Friction Stir, and Plug Weld Friction Stir.

What do you want to know?

eta, this is the biggest moveable object that I've welded on.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Externaltank.jpg

I am going to go out on a limb and say you might be making slightly more than the $12-15 an hour as a previous poster stated......


X4 oops
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:02:46 PM EDT
For all you welders what can i expect to be making if I did more than just the standard stuff. Also can someone with a partially crippled arm get a job
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:08:03 PM EDT
I managed project that included the construction of a 150k gallon water storage tank.  They brought in 3 welders to weld the outer and inner skins once it was erected.

The top guy was paid $250/hour.  Low man made $200/hour.

Granted, they were suspended a couple hundred feet in the air in harnesses, but that's damn good money.  Downside was they traveled all over the US on jobs...finish one, fly out to the next.  They were subs for Caldwell Tanks FWIW.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:23:35 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

That is funny... I personally know welders who work from a shop that is less than 20 miles from their homes that weld steam and combustion turbine buckets that are easily making $100k+ a year. These are extremely smart and talented guys that are incredible at what they do. These guys are not your average "boiler makers" though...
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
No such thing a licensed welder AFAIK.

I started learning to weld when I was 13, got my first job as a welder when I was 16, went to two years of welding school, spent ten years welding pipe and tubes.  Been certified on everything from plate to low alloy heavy wall pipe and tubes.  

Welding that pays a lot of money is a series of dead-end jobs that take you to many different shit-hole refinery/powerplant/paper mill/oil field towns where you spend most of your money on hotels and all the associated expense of living on the road.  Not to mention that you will never have a family or any semblance of a stable, functional life.

Welding that doesn't keep you on the road will get you about $12-$15 an hour.



That is funny... I personally know welders who work from a shop that is less than 20 miles from their homes that weld steam and combustion turbine buckets that are easily making $100k+ a year. These are extremely smart and talented guys that are incredible at what they do. These guys are not your average "boiler makers" though...


Mmm hmm.  How many of those shops are in the US?  Two maybe?  Trust me.  I've been a welder, had a lot of friends who were welders, many who still are.  It ain't a very glam lifestyle.  The only ones who aren't burnt-out, broke, divorced, alcoholic, drug dependent, unhappy people are the ones who quit.  I'm one of 'em.  Got out of that rut and won't go back.  

I've worked pipelines, power plants, coal mines, oil field, refineries, commercial construction as a welder and inspector.  It's no kinda life.  Making lots of money and being a disaster in every other aspect of life is failure.  It's fine for a young single guy.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:36:00 PM EDT
If any of y'all was from New York City, you might be aware that licensing is in fact required. As I remember, you have to pass either the AWS or NYSDOT as a prerequisite to apply for a NYC license. And you have to speak English and have references as to your good moral character.


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
For all you welders what can i expect to be making if I did more than just the standard stuff. Also can someone with a partially crippled arm get a job
View Quote

If you can weld in a circle and are willing to travel, you can make six figures no problem. With a couple months off to enjoy it. If you can pass the test, you can get a job. It's really not very demanding work if you can make quality welds. As long as you work safe, show up on time, and make the weld, you'll be a GOLDEN ARM.


Half inch socket welds are the biggest thing I've welded:



Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:43:14 PM EDT
I am in my 40's and I started chipping slag for my dad since I was about 6 years old. By the time I was 12 I was working nearly every summer, holiday and weekend at the my dads weld shop. Ironically I had to teach myself how to weld when I was about 15. I now own the company and have weld certifications in AWS D1.1 AWS D17.1 in Aluminum, Steel, Stainless Steel/Inconel, Titanium, and others.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:46:49 PM EDT
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Quoted:
The only ones who aren't burnt-out, broke, divorced, alcoholic, drug dependent, unhappy people are the ones who quit.  

Making lots of money and being a disaster in every other aspect of life is failure.  
View Quote


The first statement is false.

The second one is true.


You make your own choices in life. Neither welding nor traveling for work makes you a fuckup.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 3:43:29 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I've been welding since 1979.

The USAF trained me and certified me in TIG on several different alloys for manned flight hardware.

Since then I've welded in the oil patch, construction, fabrication, ornamental iron, and aerospace.

I've worked on the United States Space Shuttle External Tank for Lockheed Martin, Boeings Delta II and Delta IV, Mitsubishis liquid oxygen tanks for their space program, the ARES program for the N.A.S.A., and currently for Boeing on the SLS program.

VPPAW, GTAW, GMAW, Self Reacting Friction Stir, Conventional Friction Stir, and Plug Weld Friction Stir.

What do you want to know?

eta, this is the biggest moveable object that I've welded on.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Externaltank.jpg
View Quote
What kind of fire extinguishing equipment is there when you weld fuel tanks?
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 3:51:53 AM EDT
Don't you guys go blind by looking at that bright light?
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