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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/9/2005 12:39:46 PM EDT
Just doing some estimating here at work.....not sure what those 80lbs bags will produce off hand. If know one knows I'll call, but I'm curious how many do it yourselfers are online today
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:48:12 PM EDT
Not sure about a Sauna Tube, but it only takes two bags to ruin a hot tub.....or so I heard
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:50:13 PM EDT
How long? Theres a formula for it on the back of the bag.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:54:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 12:55:28 PM EDT by Hokie]

Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
How long? Theres a formula for it on the back of the bag.



standard 4' sauna tube

I don't have a bag of quikcrete under my desk, which is why I'm soliciting the hive mind for a quick answer....alas, thus far the response time is less than respectable
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:55:02 PM EDT
Is there a body in the tube?
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:55:59 PM EDT
which hotel pissed you off?
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:56:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
Is there a body in the tube?



lol...

nope, my bad, I should have clarified. A worthy question indeed though. The sauna tube is assumed to be empty.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:57:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 1:16:33 PM EDT by Janus]
According to my crappy math...

Each foot of 8" diameter pipe will require .34 cu. ft. of concrete.

According to Quickrete's website and 80 lb bag will fill .6 cu. ft.



edit. stupid English System and it't 12 inches/foot
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:58:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Merrell:
which hotel pissed you off?




LOL!
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:58:18 PM EDT
Whatchoo lookin to bury, Willis? You know how many yards the bag will fill? Ought to be easy to figure, from there. No instant answer, though.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 12:59:04 PM EDT
4'x8" tube?

I'd buy four bags - return one or two if you need to.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:00:17 PM EDT
After the plumer's story, Im scared you asked this!
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:01:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 1:03:13 PM EDT by Hokie]

Originally Posted By Janus:
According to my crappy math...

Each foot of 8" diameter pipe will require .5 cu. ft. of concrete.

According to Quickrete's website and 80 lb bag will fill .6 cu. ft.



ah no wonder I couldn't find it...I was spelling it wrong....dammit. I hate it when I do that.

Thanks for the info. You guys are funny.

As much as I'd LOVE to bury someone, I have 6 Sauna tubes to fill tomorrow. I'm building a 16X20 foot deck off my house. The design calls for 4 tubes, but I'm an Arfcommer, I'll do 6 just to be sure. I still have to convince my wife why I insist on parkerized patio furniture. It's funny, I deal in yards and tons at work, but put me in front of a bag of quickrete and I'm lost.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:01:43 PM EDT
Hokie, do you mean sono tube???
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:02:32 PM EDT
He means SONOTUBE. A common cylindrical cardboard concrete form.

A = pi*r^2

V= A*L

3.1416 *16 = 50.26

Say the tube is 3 feet long. 36 inches. That is 1809 cubic inches. 1728 cubic inches to the cubic foot. One 80 pound sack is about 1/2 a cubic foot so 3 sacks should do you fine.

About a bag per foot if using lots of rebar and coil.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:04:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mark75101:
Hokie, do you mean sono tube???



I'm a Mainer....I spelled it like that to keep the accent

"Sah-Nah" "Toob"
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:04:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
He means SONOTUBE. A common cylindrical cardboard concrete form.

A = pi*r^2

V= A*L

3.1416 *16 = 50.26

Say the tube is 3 feet long. 36 inches. That is 1809 cubic inches. 1728 cubic inches to the cubic foot. One 80 pound sack is about 1/2 a cubic foot so 3 sacks should do you fine.

About a bag per foot if using lots of rebar and coil.



Cool. Thanks homey.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:06:19 PM EDT
Argh, that is what you were looking for. I didn't answer because I wasn't sure what you were looking for.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:08:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 1:08:19 PM EDT by Hokie]

Originally Posted By RiftWeaver:
Argh, that is what you were looking for. I didn't answer because I wasn't sure what you were looking for.



No worries, you can work off your guilt by driving over to my house tomorrow to help dig these fuggers.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:09:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By RiftWeaver:
Argh, that is what you were looking for. I didn't answer because I wasn't sure what you were looking for.



No worries, you can work off your guilt by driving over to my house tomorrow to help dig these fuggers.



I have some Tannerite
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:09:08 PM EDT
You are talking about sonotube??





And you didnt give us length. How can we give you bags with no known length???


Anywho, if your grade is on, with no excess hole or waste, according to my numbers, you will need one bag for every foot of tube.





Call your local Ready Mix supplier!!!!

And your local Seattle mixer driver always suggests overordering 10% to prevent any unneeded delays in work.

Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:10:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 1:12:01 PM EDT by Hokie]

Originally Posted By CavVet:
You are talking about sonotube??

www.concreteacc.com/images/sonotube.jpg



And you didnt give us length. How can we give you bags with no known length???


Anywho, if your grade is on, with no excess hole or waste, according to my numbers, you will need one bag for every foot of tube.





Call your local Ready Mix supplier!!!!

And your local Seattle mixer driver always suggests overordering 10% to prevent any unneeded delays in work.




You DARE bring the stick animation into MY thread!!!

I stated 4' earlier

I'm sure hiring a Seattle truck would be very cost efficient for a 1/2 yard of concrete dropped in Maine. I'll call Monday!
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:11:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:

Originally Posted By mark75101:
Hokie, do you mean sono tube???



I'm a Mainer....I spelled it like that to keep the accent

"Sah-Nah" "Toob"



Gotcha
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:15:08 PM EDT
(pie x radius squared) x length in feet = volume of the cylinder
Don't forget to convert your units.


If you want to get real tricky you can caculate the material yeild by using the specific gravity of each compoent, the actual weight of each material and the quantity of each to determine solid volume density. Or you can just read the bag and it will give you an approx. yeild.

I'll leave the solution to the student.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:15:18 PM EDT
Another good tip is to estimate the volume of the form without rebar, chairs (used to elevate rebar off bottom) or fill sacks (sandbags used to establish footers).

So many times I have seen instances where people though a cubic yard was three cubic feet...since tape measures are in feet, I have seen one order for 9 times as much 'crete as what was needed. I even caught one new contractor stumbling on that mistake, correcting him before he made an expensive error. Believe it or not, he was in the booth next to me at a food joint.

Kinda embarassing when a total stranger saves you some serious cash...but he took it well.

1 cubic yard = 27 cubic feet

1 cubic foot = 1728 cubic inches.

1 gallon = 231 cubic inches.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:16:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 1:19:45 PM EDT by Hokie]
I'm 150% on the math, I just didn't know off-hand how much volume an 80lbs back of Quickrete produces.

Well, I'm off to Home Depot, thanks for the dialogue gentlemen! If anyone's bored tomorrow head on over for some beers n' pressure treated wood splinters!

Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:19:50 PM EDT
160 pounds per cubic foot. Must know this to design overhead forms. Kinda sucks when forms collapse with wet 'crete.

Water is only 62 pounds per cubic foot. Dry sand is 130.

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