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Posted: 3/21/2009 7:46:49 PM EDT
I have been doing some reading about the Sheriffs powers. It looks interesting. Some of these Sheriffs say you have more power than any federal agents.

link

another link
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 8:14:11 PM EDT
Are you looking for deputies or actual elected sheriffs?
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 8:36:27 PM EDT
From my understanding sheriffs can restrict access of federal and state personnel into their county, it can be overturned through a court though. Pretty cool for sure, and most sherriffs freely allow agents and staters in because they need help.
Link Posted: 3/21/2009 8:57:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By brazos609:
Are you looking for deputies or actual elected sheriffs?


It doesnt matter who it is. If you are just a deputy you can do your best to educate the guys you work with as to what the true powers of the office are.

Or eventually run for Sheriff yourself

Link Posted: 3/21/2009 9:42:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
From my understanding sheriffs can restrict access of federal and state personnel into their county, it can be overturned through a court though. Pretty cool for sure, and most sherriffs freely allow agents and staters in because they need help.


There are some pretty interesting laws regarding sheriff's (in Indiana at least). One being that only the coroner may place the sheriff under arrest.

Now let's say Mr. Sheriff get's pulled over on DUI suspension and the officer has reason to detain the Sheriff. I believe the Coroner has to actually place the Sheriff under arrest. Not sure how all that would play out, but I do believe police chiefs have been arrested for DUI so I assume an elected Sheriff has been as well.

I also believe it's against Indiana statute for a sheriff to be booked in his own jail...for obvious reasons.

The Sheriff is a very important and powerful position in government IMO; both historically and in the modern.

Link Posted: 3/21/2009 10:12:15 PM EDT
Deputy checking in here.

Same in Louisiana as far as the coroner being the only one who can actually arrest the Sheriff.

Not so sure about the whole denying access thing, but it doesn't sound too far fetched to believe.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 2:43:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jagchaser:

It doesnt matter who it is. If you are just a deputy you can do your best to educate the guys you work with as to what the true powers of the office are.

Or eventually run for Sheriff yourself



As Deputy Sheriffs our powers as Law Enforcement Officers are spelled out in the law already; no need to educate our coworkers.

I wouldn't want to have to deal with the politics of being an administrator.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 6:29:56 AM EDT
When people ask me what I do different as a "Deputy Sheriff" rather than a "Police Officer", I tell them the main difference is I'm part cop, part mail man. (paper service)
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 6:52:38 AM EDT
I believe in Oregon atleast the Sheriff, is the coroner, as far as pronouncing death, but for removal of "persons' funeral homes are called for the most part.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 7:10:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By jagchaser:

It doesnt matter who it is. If you are just a deputy you can do your best to educate the guys you work with as to what the true powers of the office are.

Or eventually run for Sheriff yourself



As Deputy Sheriffs our powers as Law Enforcement Officers are spelled out in the law already; no need to educate our coworkers.

I wouldn't want to have to deal with the politics of being an administrator.



I didnt realize that you Deputy Sheriffs knew everything, my bad
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 8:01:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By jagchaser:

It doesnt matter who it is. If you are just a deputy you can do your best to educate the guys you work with as to what the true powers of the office are.

Or eventually run for Sheriff yourself



As Deputy Sheriffs our powers as Law Enforcement Officers are spelled out in the law already; no need to educate our coworkers.

I wouldn't want to have to deal with the politics of being an administrator.



I didnt realize that you Deputy Sheriffs knew everything, my bad


Not everything, just most everything.


j/k
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 10:16:44 AM EDT
We derive our authority from the sheriff and the oath we take to him (he office). Speaking for my county and my state only, we generally have broader powers and arrest authority than the local municipalities. That causes some friction between us and the local police agencies. Overall, we are a much smaller agency, but I feel as though that allows us to train our deputies to a higher standard. I also think that the sheriff takes internal discipline issues much more seriously than the local chief.

Having done both, I am much happier as a deputy than I was as an officer.


-REAPER2502
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 10:29:41 AM EDT
Some places mix up both positions. Consolidation between city and county agencies has occurred. The Sheriff is elected and in charge. There is none of the junk from the city council and he reports directly to the people.

Officers then have city and county jurisdiction.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 11:11:29 AM EDT
Hello From COlorado. . . . . .
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 11:29:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By jagchaser:

It doesnt matter who it is. If you are just a deputy you can do your best to educate the guys you work with as to what the true powers of the office are.

Or eventually run for Sheriff yourself



As Deputy Sheriffs our powers as Law Enforcement Officers are spelled out in the law already; no need to educate our coworkers.

I wouldn't want to have to deal with the politics of being an administrator.



I didnt realize that you Deputy Sheriffs knew everything, my bad


I didn't say we knew everything; you said we needed to educate our coworkers; we get all of that stuff drilled into us in basic school and during in-service training. No need to "educate" them, as you originally said.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 11:37:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2009 11:37:54 AM EDT by NorCal_LEO]
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 4:29:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By NorCal_LEO:
Originally Posted By jagchaser:
I didnt realize that you Deputy Sheriffs knew everything, my bad



If you have a question or concern, we would be happy to discuss it. Posting shots or trolling for an argument will result in the thread being locked.


Sorry about that. I just got alittle defensive about his comment. The most of the Sheriffs I have talked to dont realize how powerful the position is. I realize that I dont know how well all Sheriffs are trained, and I probably dont know all of the pros and cons to the Sheriff position. Do they really drill ALL OF THIS into you during basic and in-service training? If so that is great.

I was just suggesting that "if some Sheriffs dont understand their full power" then others in their department could help inform them.

If the shoe fits wear it. Dont take it personally because I suggest that some may not understand their power. Maybe the ones that disregard their powers do not understand it, more than likely they understand the scope of their power and choose to bow down to the feds to keep the peace.

I have tremedous respect for the Sheriff's office here, and I think that they may be the last thing that stands between the feds and the people.

I really can appreciate and relate to the attitude of Rabidfox50's reply

I didnt realize that you Deputy Sheriffs knew everything, my bad



Not everything, just most everything.


j/k


That is the type of attitude I am used to seeing out of my Sheriff.





Link Posted: 3/22/2009 4:49:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2009 4:49:45 PM EDT by rc109a]
In Va the Sheriff is an elected official, this give them much more authority then police chiefs. I have seen Sheriffs refuse State Police to operate in their county. I think the best way it was summed up was police offices can be involved in criminal matters, while sheriff's can be involved in both criminal and civil matters. Sheriff's also have statewide authority (most will only operate in their own juridiction though), while police officers are restricted to their jurisdiction. Another point about the power is that deputies work at the pleasure of the sheriff. The sheriff can fire anyone who works for him for any reason. This is a reason why it becomes dangerous to be in the upper chain of commnd come elction time. If the incoming sheriff does not like his officers, they will fire them and get new ones. They don't need a reason. It become very political.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 5:37:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By rc109a:
In Va the Sheriff is an elected official, this give them much more authority then police chiefs. I have seen Sheriffs refuse State Police to operate in their county. I think the best way it was summed up was police offices can be involved in criminal matters, while sheriff's can be involved in both criminal and civil matters. Sheriff's also have statewide authority (most will only operate in their own juridiction though), while police officers are restricted to their jurisdiction. Another point about the power is that deputies work at the pleasure of the sheriff. The sheriff can fire anyone who works for him for any reason. This is a reason why it becomes dangerous to be in the upper chain of commnd come elction time. If the incoming sheriff does not like his officers, they will fire them and get new ones. They don't need a reason. It become very political.


Deputies can have labor unions the same as other officers, just as Sgt/Lt/Captains can be in their respective unions, however (at least around here) a Chief Deputy will not be.


Link Posted: 3/22/2009 7:14:11 PM EDT
Deputy Sheriff present...

Funny fact: Some crazy ass paranoid anti-goverment types believe only Sheriff's Deputies are real law enforcement. Because they are elected and not appointed like Police Chiefs and such. Odd.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 8:38:51 PM EDT
I would agree with that. I'm very pro LEO, and have had multiple family members in the profession for generations. One thing that was clear to me is that Highway Patrol Troopers are nothing more than traffic cops, sure they can do other things but there job is to write tickets. It was in good fun however, because relations are good between my family in LE, and troopers they joke back and forth. For my profession, HP isn't all that good, for some it may be.
Link Posted: 3/22/2009 8:49:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheFightinFrog:
Deputy Sheriff present...

Funny fact: Some crazy ass paranoid anti-goverment types believe only Sheriff's Deputies are real law enforcement. Because they are elected and not appointed like Police Chiefs and such. Odd.





Dont put me on your list!!
Link Posted: 3/23/2009 6:13:14 AM EDT
DEPUTY/DETECTIVE, POLK COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE, DES MOINES, IOWA, SIGNING IN.
Link Posted: 3/23/2009 4:27:14 PM EDT
Deputy in So. Kal.; we outrank any police officer.
Link Posted: 3/23/2009 4:54:26 PM EDT
I cant speak for all of Texas, but where I work Constables are the paper pushing process servers for the county with full arrest powers.County deputies and city officers are equal as far as arrest powers. I work for a very small town but I have county wide jurisdiction for traffic/misd/felony. I can write traffic cites anywhere in the county as long as I send the ticket to correct JP's office, not to say that I wonder the county stopping cars but I could if need be. This doesn't happen often but occasionally I observe something outside my city that just cant be overlooked ex- I was on my home one night on a two lane county road and checked a car at 124 mph........he got paper and had to see the precinct judge in that area, I got a hearty hand shake and a pat on the back from the judge. All peace officer in Texas have state wide jurisdiction with on view felonies. Troopers also have state wide authority(obviously), but mainly work traffic and accidents.
Link Posted: 3/23/2009 4:57:11 PM EDT
We have a lot of those where I'm from. They will yell that they don't recognize your authority all throughout the arrest and booking process.


Fun times.
Originally Posted By TheFightinFrog:
Deputy Sheriff present...

Funny fact: Some crazy ass paranoid anti-goverment types believe only Sheriff's Deputies are real law enforcement. Because they are elected and not appointed like Police Chiefs and such. Odd.


Link Posted: 3/24/2009 5:01:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Windex:
We have a lot of those where I'm from. They will yell that they don't recognize your authority all throughout the arrest and booking process.


Fun times.
Originally Posted By TheFightinFrog:
Deputy Sheriff present...

Funny fact: Some crazy ass paranoid anti-goverment types believe only Sheriff's Deputies are real law enforcement. Because they are elected and not appointed like Police Chiefs and such. Odd.




Did you ask them what their AR15.com screen names are?
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 3:28:01 PM EDT
Unfortunately with an elected sheriff you can end up with a totally unqualified person at the helm, maybe even a real estate broker.
Link Posted: 3/24/2009 6:20:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 762DM:
Unfortunately with an elected sheriff you can end up with a totally unqualified person at the helm, maybe even a real estate broker.


No kidding.
Link Posted: 3/25/2009 3:27:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 762DM:
Unfortunately with an elected sheriff you can end up with a totally unqualified person at the helm, maybe even a real estate broker.


No different than an elected city council telling their employee (police chief) how to do his job.

Link Posted: 3/29/2009 4:17:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RDP:
Originally Posted By 762DM:
Unfortunately with an elected sheriff you can end up with a totally unqualified person at the helm, maybe even a real estate broker.


No different than an elected city council telling their employee (police chief) how to do his job.



Its different in that the Chief can make a trained and experienced argument for or against a particular directive, and can work around instructions given. The other guy is simply a loose cannon.
Link Posted: 3/30/2009 5:11:17 AM EDT
PA is a little strange when it comes to this. From what I've seen they do more work for the prison system than they do any other LEO work. Mostly transporting inmates around. They don't seem to have the same responsibilities as Sheriffs in other states. Maybe someone can chime in on exactly what Sheriffs do in PA.

CMS
Link Posted: 3/30/2009 7:05:28 AM EDT
Originally Posted By cms81586:
PA is a little strange when it comes to this. From what I've seen they do more work for the prison system than they do any other LEO work. Mostly transporting inmates around. They don't seem to have the same responsibilities as Sheriffs in other states. Maybe someone can chime in on exactly what Sheriffs do in PA.

CMS


Can't speak for PA, but in NYS the only mandated functions of the Sheriff are running the jail and maintaining a Civil Department. About half of NYS counties do not maintain a Road Patrol.
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