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Posted: 4/25/2014 3:13:18 PM EDT
I'm interested in purchasing a used ACOG from a fellow Arfcommer but I'm wonder how long the tritium stays bright. I called Trijicon  to find out how much a "tune up" cost and for a second owner its 575.00!!
Thanks.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 3:16:47 PM EDT
Depends a lot on the concentration they use, and how much total mass of tritium makes it into the paint.

My factory Glock night sights have lasted roughly ten years before I felt they needed replacing, but that may be totally unrelated to how much tritium makes it into an ACOG.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 3:19:28 PM EDT
tritium half life is 12.3 years.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 3:19:42 PM EDT
IIRC Tritium has a half life of 12 years.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 7:28:44 PM EDT
Thanks for the info guys.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 7:35:36 PM EDT
Considering a model with the fiber optic?  That fiber optic is pretty damn effective....  You probably won't notice the dim tritium unless you're in a dark building 3,000 miles from civilization on an overcast night during a new moon.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 7:42:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/25/2014 7:43:11 PM EDT by TexasRifleman1985]
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Originally Posted By Circuits:
Depends a lot on the concentration they use, and how much total mass of tritium makes it into the paint.
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What paint?

The tritium is a gas kept in a pressurized glass vial coated internally with phosphorus.




OP: They become less than ideal to use in 10-15 years. The green ones tend to remain useful longer it seems, probably because your eyes can see it better.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:10:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ponger:
tritium half life is 12.3 years.
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Even if you assume that the light output is half its original amount when the tritium has decayed to half its original amount, the perceived brightness is still considerably more than half the original perceived brightness.

Perceived brightness is more of a logarithmic function than an linear one: A 50 percent reduction in light output power is barely noticeable to the human eye.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:14:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Skibane:


Even if you assume that the light output is half its original amount when the tritium has decayed to half its original amount, the perceived brightness is still considerably more than half the original perceived brightness.

Perceived brightness is more of a logarithmic function than an linear one: A 50 percent reduction in light output power is barely noticeable to the human eye.
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Originally Posted By Skibane:
Originally Posted By ponger:
tritium half life is 12.3 years.


Even if you assume that the light output is half its original amount when the tritium has decayed to half its original amount, the perceived brightness is still considerably more than half the original perceived brightness.

Perceived brightness is more of a logarithmic function than an linear one: A 50 percent reduction in light output power is barely noticeable to the human eye.


And I agree.
I have a 1911 with tritium mepro sights that is ten years old and the sights are still extremely visible.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:16:19 PM EDT
The serial number can be used to determine when it was built.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:16:37 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Considering a model with the fiber optic?  That fiber optic is pretty damn effective....  You probably won't notice the dim tritium unless you're in a dark building 3,000 miles from civilization on an overcast night during a new moon.
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Yup. I have a Minicog TA45 that the tritium is mostly dead in. It barely glows at night when there's very little ambient light. However, during the day or on a fairly good night; it'll still glow at a comfortable setting.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:20:49 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By pilotman:


Considering a model with the fiber optic?  That fiber optic is pretty damn effective....  You probably won't notice the dim tritium unless you're in a dark building 3,000 miles from civilization on an overcast night during a new moon.
View Quote




 
+1, those fiber optic tubes are like fucking vacuum cleaners sucking up photons and throwing them at you like an angry monkey with a handful of poo. But with less mess.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:26:11 PM EDT
The correct answer is 87 years of course.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:29:10 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Circuits:
Depends a lot on the concentration they use, and how much total mass of tritium makes it into the paint.

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No dude. Tritium is in a vial.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:40:43 PM EDT
Overall optic - great. Fiber Optics - great. Tritium - almost useless even when brand new.  I would be equally happy with mine if the tritium was dead.
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:44:22 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Considering a model with the fiber optic?  That fiber optic is pretty damn effective....  You probably won't notice the dim tritium unless you're in a dark building 3,000 miles from civilization on an overcast night during a new moon.
View Quote


Truth.

And 9 times out of 10 when you can see the glow, it's too dark to see WTF you're aiming at anyway

ACOG are still awesome sights
Link Posted: 4/25/2014 8:50:02 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 999monkeys:
Overall optic - great. Fiber Optics - great. Tritium - almost useless even when brand new.  I would be equally happy with mine if the tritium was dead.
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This.

My TA33 was a superb optic.  I sold it and went to a variable.  But in some ways I miss the ACOG.
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 7:51:07 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:


What paint?

The tritium is a gas kept in a pressurized glass vial coated internally with phosphorus.




OP: They become less than ideal to use in 10-15 years. The green ones tend to remain useful longer it seems, probably because your eyes can see it better.
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Originally Posted By TexasRifleman1985:
Originally Posted By Circuits:
Depends a lot on the concentration they use, and how much total mass of tritium makes it into the paint.


What paint?

The tritium is a gas kept in a pressurized glass vial coated internally with phosphorus.




OP: They become less than ideal to use in 10-15 years. The green ones tend to remain useful longer it seems, probably because your eyes can see it better.

Thanks.
Link Posted: 4/26/2014 7:54:06 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Ragin_Cajun:


Truth.

And 9 times out of 10 when you can see the glow, it's too dark to see WTF you're aiming at anyway

ACOG are still awesome sights
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Originally Posted By Ragin_Cajun:
Originally Posted By pilotman:
Considering a model with the fiber optic?  That fiber optic is pretty damn effective....  You probably won't notice the dim tritium unless you're in a dark building 3,000 miles from civilization on an overcast night during a new moon.


Truth.

And 9 times out of 10 when you can see the glow, it's too dark to see WTF you're aiming at anyway

ACOG are still awesome sights


You don't want to go down that clusterfuck  of a road.  
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