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Posted: 10/12/2004 7:26:20 AM EST
I need to learn to weld... As a youth (teen) I used to do minor ARk/Stick welding on my Grandfathers Farm but most of that was simple stuff or crude repairs to equipment...

I have been looking at welding options and it really looks like I need to learn to TIG weld for many of the small projects that I want to do.... Gun stuff (1919a4,, Bren, AKs, etc) and Classic Mustang (1967 Mustang Convertible) work mostly...

I am also cusious what would be a decent BOTTOM level TIG welder and what kind of money do I need to invest to get the basic machine to try to learn?

Thanks for any advise!
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:31:17 AM EST
Why tig over mig?

I believe you can do everything you described with a mig welder since I did not see the need to weld aluminum.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:41:36 AM EST
My understanding was that for sheet metal that TIG was suggested or needed.... Now, if you think MIG will work... how hard is that to learn? What about the gasless Mig systems that use a flux filled wire?
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:44:58 AM EST

Originally Posted By Quarterbore:
I have been looking at welding options and it really looks like I need to learn to TIG weld for many of the small projects that I want to do.... Gun stuff (1919a4,, Bren, AKs, etc) and Classic Mustang (1967 Mustang Convertible) work mostly...



Something has gone very wrong if you need to weld on an AK. The only exception is permanently attaching a long muzzle attachment to the 12 inch long AMD 65 barrel. Even in that case, it's an unstressed little bead...
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:48:47 AM EST
If you know how to oxy/acetelen (sp) weld/ braze...you should be able to TIG.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:50:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/12/2004 7:51:26 AM EST by Quarterbore]

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:

Something has gone very wrong if you need to weld on an AK. The only exception is permanently attaching a long muzzle attachment to the 12 inch long AMD 65 barrel. Even in that case, it's an unstressed little bead...



Well, some people's brains just don't quite when they should... The welding project I am working on is welding up a rear trunion for a pistol build... I also have a couple extra holes in the AK receiver that need to be welded closed and with a franken pistol like this there is no better place to learn to weld...

Yup... That's ME =>

As for Brazing... I have done some with teh MAPP/Oxy setup and it came out pretty good if I do say so myself!
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 7:58:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By fallingwrench:
Why tig over mig?

I believe you can do everything you described with a mig welder since I did not see the need to weld aluminum.



TIG is very clean and can be used on just about everything .......given the size of the welder . MIG is great for production runs or mild steel Aluminum with a MIG is.................. lets say a CHEAP machine aint gonna work for ya I would buy a TIG over MIG but thats me I have a couple of TIGS {lincolns} a 255 and a 375 they are not cheap but will do anything I need including Alum.. Stainless, Nickel Bronze. Mag. Steel, Bronze, . My .02 PG
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 8:02:35 AM EST
mig welding is plenty strong i think. and its easy, i taught my self how to mig weld with a book abought on amazon.com i have welded exhaust pipes on a shelby cobra replica my dad and i built and even started welding a tube frame for a sandrail. when i get home from school i am going to try an ak-47 lower weld kit. mig welders are cheap too compared to tig IIRC.

Jservis
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 8:10:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/12/2004 8:13:31 AM EST by Rob877]
Tig welding is A art Here is The Tig Welder I use At Work Isn’t Cheep but Does a good Job. My opinion is you have to have a lot of welding experience before even attempting using a tig welder. Take some welding Classes the best way to learn how to tig weld. The Only Thing I hate About Tig welding is when you bump your elbow on some thing metal when your welding and then you will get the shock of your life.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 8:22:09 AM EST
Since we're talking welding here. Would it be possible to stick weld a lump of metal onto a 1911 grip safety and then shape it? Would it be possible to stick weld some extra metal onto the frame tangs (in the rear) of a 1911 to fill the gap between the grip safety and the frame?

Stick welder is all I have access to at present.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 8:24:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Since we're talking welding here. Would it be possible to stick weld a lump of metal onto a 1911 grip safety and then shape it? Would it be possible to stick weld some extra metal onto the frame tangs (in the rear) of a 1911 to fill the gap between the grip safety and the frame?

Stick welder is all I have access to at present.



I dont see why not, but you risk ruining the heat treatment of the frame if you get it too hot, I'd try the grip safety first since they are cheap to replace, just be prepared to do a lot of filing to get it down, and dont try to put too much metal on in one pass.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 8:36:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Since we're talking welding here. Would it be possible to stick weld a lump of metal onto a 1911 grip safety and then shape it? Would it be possible to stick weld some extra metal onto the frame tangs (in the rear) of a 1911 to fill the gap between the grip safety and the frame?

Stick welder is all I have access to at present.



If your welder is AC/DC all you need is a TIG torch, regulator, and gas bottle.
I have an old Miller AC/DC arc welder, a 100 amp TIG torch for steel, S.S., etc,
a 150 amp torch with a high freq. unit for aluminum. I use Argon for everything.
(Too lazy to keep changing bottles) I find TIG (except on Aluminum) to be real easy to do small neat looking welds. YMMV as always.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 9:50:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By Wraith:

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Since we're talking welding here. Would it be possible to stick weld a lump of metal onto a 1911 grip safety and then shape it? Would it be possible to stick weld some extra metal onto the frame tangs (in the rear) of a 1911 to fill the gap between the grip safety and the frame?

Stick welder is all I have access to at present.



If your welder is AC/DC all you need is a TIG torch, regulator, and gas bottle.
I have an old Miller AC/DC arc welder, a 100 amp TIG torch for steel, S.S., etc,
a 150 amp torch with a high freq. unit for aluminum. I use Argon for everything.
(Too lazy to keep changing bottles) I find TIG (except on Aluminum) to be real easy to do small neat looking welds. YMMV as always.



I beleive you would also need a hi freq box TIG welding on the 1911 would be alot less heat transfer
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 9:50:10 AM EST
The nice thing about TIG is that it can weld the nicest looking welds imaginable by hand.

You can also do very small welds with complete control like welding 1911 rails up to size.

It can take a long time to master. I spent 3 months in welding school welding with TIG for 2 months, 8 hours a day, and I would never say I am an exceptional welder.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 9:54:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By propguy:

Originally Posted By Wraith:

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Since we're talking welding here. Would it be possible to stick weld a lump of metal onto a 1911 grip safety and then shape it? Would it be possible to stick weld some extra metal onto the frame tangs (in the rear) of a 1911 to fill the gap between the grip safety and the frame?

Stick welder is all I have access to at present.



If your welder is AC/DC all you need is a TIG torch, regulator, and gas bottle.
I have an old Miller AC/DC arc welder, a 100 amp TIG torch for steel, S.S., etc,
a 150 amp torch with a high freq. unit for aluminum. I use Argon for everything.
(Too lazy to keep changing bottles) I find TIG (except on Aluminum) to be real easy to do small neat looking welds. YMMV as always.



I beleive you would also need a hi freq box TIG welding on the 1911 would be alot less heat transfer



Strike for arc on everything but Alum. Hi freq. does make for easy welding, but is not needed.
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:05:19 AM EST
Tig is the most versitile form of welding. It takes practice though.
The key to using tig is the argon. You want to be able to purge the area that you are welding. Oxygen will fuck up you weld.
I use a miller 250 or 350 series.
A used 250 is all you would ever need.
SYNCROWAVE 250 DX
www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/productguide.html
Although i have been hearing good things about the lincoln series lately.



Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:07:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By 3-7INFANTRY:
Tig is the most versitile form of welding. It takes practice though.
The key to using tig is the argon. You want to be able to purge the area that you are welding. Oxygen will fuck up you weld.
I use a miller 250 or 350 series.
A used 250 is all you would ever need.
SYNCROWAVE 250 DX
www.millerwelds.com/products/tig/productguide.html
Although i have been hearing good things about the lincoln series lately.






I have a 375 with the Micro Start no Hi Freq She runs like a dream
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:11:23 AM EST
If you are fair to middlin in the handyman arena , I give TIG a difficulty rating of about 4 if you are only talking small jobs that aren't aluminum or some exotic metal. On mild steel , CM or even most stainless it's a piece of cake and clean as a whistle.
No hi freq needed unless it's aluminum. Clean it all very well just before striking the arc and you are on your way.

One hint.... don't use a coathanger ....that blue stuff is NOT flux.

Rip
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:18:01 AM EST


I've TIG welded for many years, miles and miles of it. (mostly stainless where looks count)

It's a great skill to learn.


Anyone can do a sloppy tig weld. It's an art to do it right.

The downside is that funky burnt argon smell that stays in your skin even after you shower


Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:41:18 AM EST
TIG provides best results. MIG can be satisfactory and is well suited for those with a low level of skill. Buy a used TIG or expect to pay $1500 + for a Miller or Lincoln. TIG is very clean, great penetration, minimal heat migration and works with all metals. If you are willing to invest the time to learn and practice, it is a great system.

I find it easier than stick, harder than MIG but not much. I have vision problems that contribute to that opinion. Be sure to buy good helmet (I love autodarkening ones), wear long sleeves and appropriate gloves. Many guys wear a scarf or use other method to provide coverage below helmet - above shirt. TIG can really give you a sunburn!
Link Posted: 10/12/2004 10:56:38 AM EST
I get sun burns all of the time from my arc/stick welder...You would think I would learn but when I need to weld I just do it...about an hour later I realize I wasn't covered!
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