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Posted: 1/25/2014 7:52:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 7:53:24 AM EDT by godzillamax]
I've got an '05 F250 diesel 6.0 superduty 4x4 with 110k miles. Needs new shocks. I do most the basic maintenance myself, but have never tried more mechanical repairs. I'm fairly comfortable working on my truck. Curious how hard this would be? Any special tools or equipment needed? Or just jack it up, unbolt old shocks and bolt on new ones?

Thanks
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 7:53:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 7:53:33 AM EDT by sitdwnandhngon]
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 7:53:49 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
View Quote

Coils
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 7:58:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By godzillamax:

Coils
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Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?

Coils



WMD
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:00:02 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By godzillamax:

Coils
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?

Coils


Are they set up like struts or are the shocks separate from the springs?

I have only ever worked on leaf springs on the front so I don't know, if they aren't like struts though same deal, just unbolt the shocks and put the new ones on.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:00:56 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By quick2k3:



WMD
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Originally Posted By quick2k3:
Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?

Coils



WMD

Coils = Weapon of Mass Destruction?
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:03:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 8:06:06 AM EDT by MiloBloom]
"Rent"  a coil compressor from Autozone to do the fronts.

Piece of cake.


ETA: Replace fronts with Bilstein 5100's to level off front-end if you haven't done
        anything with it to this point.



Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:06:50 AM EDT
In for the head injury
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:09:14 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Are they set up like struts or are the shocks separate from the springs?

I have only ever worked on leaf springs on the front so I don't know, if they aren't like struts though same deal, just unbolt the shocks and put the new ones on.
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?

Coils


Are they set up like struts or are the shocks separate from the springs?

I have only ever worked on leaf springs on the front so I don't know, if they aren't like struts though same deal, just unbolt the shocks and put the new ones on.

shocks are separate from coils
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:09:29 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.



Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.



Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
View Quote
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.



 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:09:37 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MiloBloom:
"Rent"  a coil compressor from Autozone to do the fronts.

Piece of cake.


ETA: Replace fronts with Bilstein 5100's to level off front-end if you haven't done
        anything with it to this point.



View Quote


From what I can find in google image search it wouldn't be needed. The shocks sit outside the coil.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:10:19 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 


Dude. I am from NY.

Syracuse is called the salt city. PB Blaster and the impact are mandatory for any project around here.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:12:16 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 


Clean threads off w/ wire brush, shot of PB Blaster once a day, for a few days, prior to removing originals.

Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:15:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.
 


This, rust is your only enemy.

Dave W.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:21:25 AM EDT
If you live up north, the most efficient way to remove shocks/struts is using a fire wrench. Use the coil spring compressors to shrink the spring down and then use the fire wrench to remove rusted bolts. If you don't have a fire wrench, lots of liquid wrench and a map gas torch with a good 6 sided wrench is the ticket. (fire wrench= acetylene torch).
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:23:29 AM EDT


I did my 03 F250 not long ago.  other than cussing rusty bolts, not a big deal.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:32:59 AM EDT
Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:55:31 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Alpha82:
Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.
View Quote


If an '05 is vintage what does that make my '95 Powerstroke?
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 8:56:30 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


If an '05 is vintage what does that make my '95 Powerstroke?
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Alpha82:
Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.


If an '05 is vintage what does that make my '95 Powerstroke?


Underpowered.
Yet reliable.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:19:18 AM EDT
A sawzall with a three inch metal cutting blade is a nice accessory to have when replacing truck shocks.



At least that's been the case for me.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:20:15 AM EDT
shocks are super easy, if they're struts it's little more involved.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:24:28 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dave15:


Underpowered.
Yet reliable.
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Originally Posted By Dave15:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Alpha82:
Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.


If an '05 is vintage what does that make my '95 Powerstroke?


Underpowered.
Yet reliable.


I'll give you that one. Tough old bitch just starts up when needed and gets me and my trailer where I need to go. 250k on the clock and just got a new clutch, hopefully I can get another 100k out of it before something major happens.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:25:23 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LutzNutz:
shocks are super easy, if they're struts it's little more involved.
View Quote


I hate struts, I always picture both clamps breaking loose at the same time and turning the bastard into a brain seeking missile.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:26:21 AM EDT
If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:28:12 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NathanJK:
If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.
View Quote


I love working on project cars, I hate with a passion working on daily drivers though.

I could build a Jeep from the axles up without taking a break if I had all the tools and material in the shop, and enjoy almost all of it.

Changing the oil on my work truck though gets me all annoyed.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:34:41 AM EDT
Only because I haven't seen this mentioned yet: Don't remove those front shocks with the suspension unloaded.  The spring would vigorously separate itself from the truck (or at least try to).  If you must jack it up, just lift it by the suspension.

I'm a big fan of the Bilstein shocks... Don't get cheap O shocks, you'll be disappointed.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 9:52:10 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


I love working on project cars, I hate with a passion working on daily drivers though.

I could build a Jeep from the axles up without taking a break if I had all the tools and material in the shop, and enjoy almost all of it.

Changing the oil on my work truck though gets me all annoyed.
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By NathanJK:
If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.


I love working on project cars, I hate with a passion working on daily drivers though.

I could build a Jeep from the axles up without taking a break if I had all the tools and material in the shop, and enjoy almost all of it.

Changing the oil on my work truck though gets me all annoyed.


I enjoyed working on cars until I built a project car .  The expense and frustration drove the love from me.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:03:16 AM EDT
Good luck with the front shocks. They're a PITA with the bolt in top. I couldn't get a wrench or impact on it so I had to do it with a wrench.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:08:01 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Alpha82:
Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.
View Quote

What kind of air tools would you need? I have a compressor, but not any air tools.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:08:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 10:10:01 AM EDT by Lester_Burnham]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NathanJK:
I enjoyed working on cars until I built a project car .  The expense and frustration drove the love from me.
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Originally Posted By NathanJK:





Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:




Originally Posted By NathanJK:


If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.






I love working on project cars, I hate with a passion working on daily drivers though.





I could build a Jeep from the axles up without taking a break if I had all the tools and material in the shop, and enjoy almost all of it.





Changing the oil on my work truck though gets me all annoyed.






I enjoyed working on cars until I built a project car .  The expense and frustration drove the love from me.



Yeah, same here.  Working on a '64 F100 that's become a great deal more of a "project" than I thought it was going to be.



OP:  spray the hell out of the nuts/bolts on your shocks the day before you plan on replacing them with PB Blaster.





 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:11:13 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NathanJK:
If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.
View Quote

Yeah, I just had my wife's car ('07 Mitsubishi Outlander) in the shop for a faulty tire pressure sensor needed to be replaced. I inquired about having them do new front and read struts. Price quote was $1,100. $470 for parts, and almost $600 for labor. Her car has 115k miles on it, and those probably need to be done.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:13:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 10:16:33 AM EDT by Lester_Burnham]



Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Yeah, I just had my wife's car ('07 Mitsubishi Outlander) in the shop for a faulty tire pressure sensor needed to be replaced. I inquired about having them do new front and read struts. Price quote was $1,100. $470 for parts, and almost $600 for labor. Her car has 115k miles on it, and those probably need to be done.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By godzillamax:
Originally Posted By NathanJK:



If it makes you feel any better, I'm about to go do struts and a lower control arm on my car .  I feel your car-work misery! I hate working on cars, but I love saving money.




Yeah, I just had my wife's car ('07 Mitsubishi Outlander) in the shop for a faulty tire pressure sensor needed to be replaced. I inquired about having them do new front and read struts. Price quote was $1,100. $470 for parts, and almost $600 for labor. Her car has 115k miles on it, and those probably need to be done.




Struts aren't too bad to do if you buy the whole strut/coil spring assembly.  They are a huge pain in the ass if you just replace the strut.





I am inside from my 3rd or 4th "warming up" since 11am, working on the most horrific automotive task I have ever done, replacing a damaged and of course, subsequently seized, 50 year old kingpin.
 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 10:30:20 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Dude. I am from NY.

Syracuse is called the salt city. PB Blaster and the impact are mandatory for any project around here.  
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.  


Dude. I am from NY.

Syracuse is called the salt city. PB Blaster and the impact are mandatory for any project around here.  


Plus a healthy supply of stainless steel and brass hardware so the next time won't be so bad.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 12:25:29 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


I hate struts, I always picture both clamps breaking loose at the same time and turning the bastard into a brain seeking missile.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By LutzNutz:
shocks are super easy, if they're struts it's little more involved.


I hate struts, I always picture both clamps breaking loose at the same time and turning the bastard into a brain seeking missile.


that's why I use four clamps.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 12:31:50 PM EDT
it obviously varies from vehicle to vehicle, but a combination of a pivoting head ratcheting wrench (like so) and large vice grips to rotate the shock itself works very well. Sawzall sometimes required.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 12:41:12 PM EDT
Spray bolts/nuts with WD40 or something, I broke the bottom bolt on my front lower A arm on my dodge taking it off, and that's all I got to say about that.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 2:51:27 PM EDT
Got tools. get to work.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:00:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FlyingGorilla:


Plus a healthy supply of stainless steel and brass hardware so the next time won't be so bad.
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Originally Posted By FlyingGorilla:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Originally Posted By Angry-American:
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
Unbolt shocks, bolt new ones on.

Piece of cake, for the rear anyway.

Does it have coils or leafs in the front?
Op lives in the rust belt, it may not be so easy.  


Dude. I am from NY.

Syracuse is called the salt city. PB Blaster and the impact are mandatory for any project around here.  


Plus a healthy supply of stainless steel and brass hardware so the next time won't be so bad.




This. ^^^
And never seize.  
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:02:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/25/2014 3:04:19 PM EDT by pale_pony]
If you cannot safely handle a strut compressor, you have NO friggin' business with a gun.



If you can handle a loaded weapon; keep your booger hook off of the bullet button until you're ready to fire, not muzzle sweep anyone, and utilize front and rear sights to hit a target at 10 yards, you can safely handle a strut compressor.

See YouTube for instructions and use your good judgment.


Wild strut stories are mostly crap concocted by people without a clue, or unscrupulous mechanics who are trying to convince people not to do a gravy DIY fix because they charge lots of money for it.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:04:43 PM EDT
It is not struts unless I am missing something . It should be a shock completely separate from the spring.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 6:10:59 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
From what I can find in google image search it wouldn't be needed. The shocks sit outside the coil.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:



Originally Posted By MiloBloom:

"Rent"  a coil compressor from Autozone to do the fronts.



Piece of cake.





ETA: Replace fronts with Bilstein 5100's to level off front-end if you haven't done

        anything with it to this point.




From what I can find in google image search it wouldn't be needed. The shocks sit outside the coil.
this, soak bolts/nuts with PB blaster or similar penetrating oil a couple of times for several days before you attempt to do the job, super easy job on a super duty

 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 6:12:37 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 50-140:


A sawzall with a three inch metal cutting blade is a nice accessory to have when replacing truck shocks.


View Quote

At least that's been the case for me.
for a chevy it is mandatory

 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 6:14:11 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:
I'll give you that one. Tough old bitch just starts up when needed and gets me and my trailer where I need to go. 250k on the clock and just got a new clutch, hopefully I can get another 100k out of it before something major happens.
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Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:



Originally Posted By Dave15:


Originally Posted By sitdwnandhngon:


Originally Posted By Alpha82:

Extremely easy on that vintage superduty, hardest part is if neccessary holding the hex on the shock body while backing off the top nut, with air tools it's less than 1/2 an hour all the way around.




If an '05 is vintage what does that make my '95 Powerstroke?




Underpowered.

Yet reliable.




I'll give you that one. Tough old bitch just starts up when needed and gets me and my trailer where I need to go. 250k on the clock and just got a new clutch, hopefully I can get another 100k out of it before something major happens.
mine (97) started right up after sitting for two months for a dump run, Lucky it has been warm in AK lately

 
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 6:25:22 PM EDT
Do it like this





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