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Posted: 9/12/2004 5:04:26 PM EST
I've always been interested in History and Firearms and wonder how I'd go about becoming a Historian? What kind of classes would I need to take in school, is there any schools that are better then others or as long as they have the classes are they all about equal? I'd like to be on History Channel shows talking about firearms history or the history of a battle, I think I'd be good at it since I've read about it and watched it most of my life. I"m 43 and really need to fine something that I enjoy and am good at to do for the rest of my working life. Talk to ya'll later.[
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:05:43 PM EST
go to college and get a degree in history. then get your masters and doctorate...you should be on the history channel by the time your 55
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:07:54 PM EST
Go to college, geek out in history, make great grades, write papers for peer-reviewed journals that get you noticed, get to know people and establish yourself as a serious, professional scholar. This should only take about eight years of your life to accomplish.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:08:13 PM EST
Actually, a shorter route to being a "historian" is to get an MLS degree - Master's of Library Science. Look into it.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:09:09 PM EST
You mean AN historian, don't you?
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:09:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By -Absolut-:
go to college and get a degree in history. then get your masters and doctorate...you should be on the history channel by the time your 55



Pretty much...
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:14:17 PM EST
I just think it'd be neat to do something that I'm already good at. I watch "Tales of the Gun" and know as much or more then the people that are on the show. I just think if a person has to work for a living why not do something that you enjoy and have a natural aptitude for. I think I could test out of some classes, that might save a year or so of study. I'll have to check into the local Community College to see what's available.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:15:46 PM EST
I have an uncle who is a historian and museum curator for the Army. His degree is in art, and he is also a military illustrator. he started as a lowly museum tech and worked his way up. he has done off camera work for the History Channel, as well as with Dale Dye, the film "Dances With Wolves", and others, and a few books (all profits are given to the museum).
he knows more about military shyte than anyone I know, from the Pilgrims to yesterday, although he is really a Civil War wierdo lol.
Anyway, he studied art on the GI Bill. It wouldn't hurt to cultivate acquaintances with folks already in the field. it's a smallish community and they all know or know of each other.

He's a great guy and my favorite relative, right up there with my Father and my sons.

Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:20:40 PM EST
Get several degrees in history. Write articles that get you noticed. Typically this will involve something with "race, class, gender". On the strength of your PhD and your contacts and your published work get a teaching gig for peanuts at a small college and spend every waking moment grading semi-literate papers by ignorant undergrads. That's the best case. It's more likely that you'll wind up doing the adjunct thing and teach on one year contracts, moving from college to college until you have enough published to latch on somewhere. The most likely case is that you never get into the college teaching thing at all and wander off to do something else. Law school is a famous escape hatch.
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 5:27:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/12/2004 5:30:45 PM EST by corwin1968]
A guy who went to my high school (I think two years younger than me) has been a commentator at least twice on Wild West Tech. When I first saw and recognized him I did some research and it seems he has degrees in JOURNALISM!!

Seems he is the editor of Old West magazine and somehow got tapped by the history channel.

Even though the PhD route is probably by far the most common to become an "historian" there are other ways to make a living in the field.

Good luck!!
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 7:35:59 AM EST
Also learn another language--that will be very important.

GunLvr
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