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Posted: 1/28/2014 5:21:01 PM EDT
I have been thinking about getting a beehive for a few years now.

I have one rural acre of my very own and all around our entire property is blackberries, gallons of them for us each year. I am totally surround by woods and farmland on three sides and one neighbor through a hedgerow. I have a pretty good sized garden each year and my wife love to plan flowers all over the place, there would be plenty of action for some motivated bees. I could tuck their hive back in the far corner and they wouldn't be bothered by anyone.

I know literally nothing about bees though, and don't really know anyone local that has them.

What steps does one take to getting a hive set up, and is it feasible to think I might get a little honey from them?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:24:37 PM EDT
[#1]
You can order one online, as well as all the necessary equipment and supplies.  My sister kept bees for a long time, started out with one hive, and produced lots of honey.  She got my folks into it as well, and they did well until they got too old to work the hives.  Go for it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:26:34 PM EDT
[#2]
Ride around the Farm country till you find some of these




Take one


Profit.




Make sure your not at rick of having that killer bee hybrid invade there WAY bad.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:27:44 PM EDT
[#3]
Find a 1970's hair salon?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:29:21 PM EDT
[#5]
My sister got into bee keeping a few years ago. She got in contact with a local beekeeper and he gave her lots of tips, plus a reading list. She now has 4-5 fully functional hives and sells local honey.

Usually, beekeepers will be ready for a new hive. Periodically, an  established hive will split up (this is called "swarming"), with about 1/3 of the bees leaving with a new queen. They temporarily set up housekeeping in a tree, bush, or under the eaves of someone's house. The beekeeper is frequently called by the county* to remove them. At this stage they are quite docile; you can find pics of people moving them with bare hands, faces, etc.

There's a procedure to introduce them into their new home, the beekeeper can tell you what it is, it involves having at least 2 complete boxes IIRC.

BTW I'm told that if you encounter some "africanized" bees, you can tame them by replacing their queen with a domestic "un-africanized" bee queen.




*In many areas, it is actually illegal to kill a swarm of bees, so they are removed live.


DISCLAIMER: I am not a beekeeper, I'm passing along some of my sister's and brother's experiences.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:29:36 PM EDT
[#6]
IBTBK1
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:31:18 PM EDT
[#7]
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:32:48 PM EDT
[#8]
Knock it out of a tree with a bat?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:33:03 PM EDT
[#9]

Quoted:


I have been thinking about getting a beehive for a few years now.



I have one rural acre of my very own and all around our entire property is blackberries, gallons of them for us each year. I am totally surround by woods and farmland on three sides and one neighbor through a hedgerow. I have a pretty good sized garden each year and my wife love to plan flowers all over the place, there would be plenty of action for some motivated bees. I could tuck their hive back in the far corner and they wouldn't be bothered by anyone.



I know literally nothing about bees though, and don't really know anyone local that has them.



What steps does one take to getting a hive set up, and is it feasible to think I might get a little honey from them?
View Quote




Read the thread I linked above.  It had EVERYTHING.



Join a local beekeeping club.  Classes are being held NOW.  Find a local beekeeper to mentor you.



Order a package of bees no later than March 1.  Don't wait until March.  You'll get too far behind the curve for this year.



No honey until Year 2 - and then only if they are thriving and have excess.



 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:34:18 PM EDT
[#10]
find one in the woods, just grab it an bring it home, it'll be fine.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:34:49 PM EDT
[#11]
I started last year. I love it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:36:35 PM EDT
[#12]
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:39:21 PM EDT
[#13]
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:39:28 PM EDT
[#14]
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Quoted:
find one in the woods, just grab it an bring it home, it'll be fine.
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Funny you mention that, I have a funny story.

One day at my parents house when I was still living there, about 15 or 16 years old a huge cherry tree in the pasture fell over one day, about 40 ft tall and very large at the base.

It hit the ground and split in half and a billion honey bees flew out, that sucker was honey comb for about 20 feet solid inside.

We all took turns running in and grabbing buckets of it and got stung all to hell, we had honey for years.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:43:17 PM EDT
[#16]
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Quoted:
I started last year. I love it.
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I have to start over this year.....






Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:45:27 PM EDT
[#17]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


It's unfortunate that happened, but having photographic evidence of the perp is hilarious.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:48:33 PM EDT
[#18]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


Neighbor had his hives destroyed that way.  Before he put up replacement hives he installed an electric fence around their location.  25,000volts and zero bear attacks on the new hives.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:50:35 PM EDT
[#19]
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He's  a  decent  size  blackie, isn't  he ?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:51:40 PM EDT
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Funny you mention that, I have a funny story.

One day at my parents house when I was still living there, about 15 or 16 years old a huge cherry tree in the pasture fell over one day, about 40 ft tall and very large at the base.

It hit the ground and split in half and a billion honey bees flew out, that sucker was honey comb for about 20 feet solid inside.

We all took turns running in and grabbing buckets of it and got stung all to hell, we had honey for years.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
find one in the woods, just grab it an bring it home, it'll be fine.


Funny you mention that, I have a funny story.

One day at my parents house when I was still living there, about 15 or 16 years old a huge cherry tree in the pasture fell over one day, about 40 ft tall and very large at the base.

It hit the ground and split in half and a billion honey bees flew out, that sucker was honey comb for about 20 feet solid inside.

We all took turns running in and grabbing buckets of it and got stung all to hell, we had honey for years.


that actually sounds pretty awesome
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:54:48 PM EDT
[#21]
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Quoted:


that actually sounds pretty awesome
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
find one in the woods, just grab it an bring it home, it'll be fine.


Funny you mention that, I have a funny story.

One day at my parents house when I was still living there, about 15 or 16 years old a huge cherry tree in the pasture fell over one day, about 40 ft tall and very large at the base.

It hit the ground and split in half and a billion honey bees flew out, that sucker was honey comb for about 20 feet solid inside.

We all took turns running in and grabbing buckets of it and got stung all to hell, we had honey for years.


that actually sounds pretty awesome


We hooked about an 8 foot chunk that didn't split up to the tractor and dragged up way out back and put it in a tree, they stayed active in it for about 3 more years and then they were just gone. They probably had a hard time bouncing back from their house falling over and exploding.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:54:54 PM EDT
[#22]


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One thing I'll say for Mann Lake - they have two free shipping periods each year.  If you are ordering woodware (hives, supers, nucs, frames etc etc etc etc) - free shipping can save you $50-100+ in shipping fees.  Wood is HEAVY.  Not to mention foundation, tools etc.





Their prices and quality are GREAT.  They are my primary go-to source.





 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 5:57:45 PM EDT
[#23]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


Hang bacon on the wire. That way the bear gets tender parts of his face touching the wire. We have bears that will crash through hot wires. The thick hide and hair with low nerve counts minimizes the affect of the voltage. But after learning that the wire is hot (to the face), the bear will learn to stay away the first time.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:00:30 PM EDT
[#24]
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Quoted:



One think I'll say for Mann Lake - they have two free shipping periods each year.  If you are ordering woodware (hives, supers, nucs, frames etc etc etc etc) - free shipping can save you $50-100+ in shipping fees.  Wood is HEAVY.  Not to mention foundation, tools etc.

Their prices and quality are GREAT.  They are my primary go-to source.
 
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Quoted:



One think I'll say for Mann Lake - they have two free shipping periods each year.  If you are ordering woodware (hives, supers, nucs, frames etc etc etc etc) - free shipping can save you $50-100+ in shipping fees.  Wood is HEAVY.  Not to mention foundation, tools etc.

Their prices and quality are GREAT.  They are my primary go-to source.
 


I live 40 min from Mann Lake, and 50 min from Dadant. It's great. And painful to my wallet.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:02:16 PM EDT
[#25]


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Quoted:



find one in the woods, just grab it an bring it home, it'll be fine.
View Quote






Or you can collect swarms (if you can find one).  Here is one I collected off a kid's jungle gym set:
















































 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:03:44 PM EDT
[#26]

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Quoted:
I live 40 min from Mann Lake, and 50 min from Dadant. It's great. And painful to my wallet.
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Quoted:



Quoted:








One think I'll say for Mann Lake - they have two free shipping periods each year.  If you are ordering woodware (hives, supers, nucs, frames etc etc etc etc) - free shipping can save you $50-100+ in shipping fees.  Wood is HEAVY.  Not to mention foundation, tools etc.



Their prices and quality are GREAT.  They are my primary go-to source.

 




I live 40 min from Mann Lake, and 50 min from Dadant. It's great. And painful to my wallet.




Its official.  I hate you.



 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:05:07 PM EDT
[#27]
There is actually a surprising amount of beekeepers listed in the yellow pages
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 6:11:52 PM EDT
[#28]
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