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Posted: 5/23/2005 1:55:50 PM EDT
I have a 1996 Jimmy. Trans was rebuilt 20k mile ago by local shop. 3rd & 4th went out.

Shop owner says the guys that were running the shop have since been 'run off' for poor work/selling his stock & keeping money. Trans had a 6mo/6k mile warranty, but owner admits it should have lasted longer. His 'idea' of helping me is a $200 off of a $1600 rebuild.

I told him there was no damned way I would pay that. I did not expect a free rebuild. But paying $1400 now after having it done 10 months ago is BS.

So how hard is rebuilding it? I've got a line on a tech manual, & the parts kits run about $180~$250. I am skilled enough to do the remove/install, but am leery of the rebuild.

Any advice is welcomed.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 2:01:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 2:04:33 PM EDT by KS_Physicist]
Look for an independent mechanictransmission guy.

Assuming that the major parts are reusable (case, drums, shafts, gears) you're only talking a few hundred for parts and labor. I had great results from an independent guy rebuilding my 'Cuda trans, after the local chain transmission ship completely screwed it up.

Unless labor on those GM trannies is a whole lot different from labor on Chrysler trannies, you should be able to knock a thou off that quote!

Jim

p.s.--If you rebuild it yourself, cleanliness and caution are the keys! Dent/scratch the valve body and you buy a new one. Open the valve body and watch ball bearings (valves) and springs go everywhere--and you're buying a new one. Personally, I'd leave it to the pros unless you have all of the following: the time to do a full rebuild without large breaks, an organized shop where you can do the rebuild yourself, mechanical ability to improvise stands and tools, and enough money to buy another trans if you screw this one up!
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 2:07:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:
Look for an independent mechanictransmission guy.

Assuming that the major parts are reusable (case, drums, shafts, gears) you're only talking a few hundred for parts and labor. I had great results from an independent guy rebuilding my 'Cuda trans, after the local chain transmission ship completely screwed it up.

Unless labor on those GM trannies is a whole lot different from labor on Chrysler trannies, you should be able to knock a thou off that quote!

Jim

p.s.--If you rebuild it yourself, cleanliness and caution are the keys! Dent/scratch the valve body and you buy a new one. Open the valve body and watch ball bearings (valves) and springs go everywhere--and you're buying a new one. Personally, I'd leave it to the pros unless you have all of the following: the time to do a full rebuild without large breaks, an organized shop where you can do the rebuild yourself, mechanical ability to improvise stands and tools, and enough money to buy another trans if you screw this one up!



Big huge +1. If you're leery AT ALL about doing a tranny, and aren't sure of EXACTLY what you're doing, and don't have the tools necessary, leave it to the pros.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:16:26 PM EDT
I'm not a wrench-head but more of a tinkerer. However, the advice I have ALWAYS been given is that while you may rebuild your engine yourself, you'd better be an expert at trannys to do your own. Maybe you got the guy who was still "learning" doing the major work on your tranny last time.

Sorry to hear about that.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:18:15 PM EDT
Is it a slushbox or stick? Manual transmissions are easy to rebuild, autos are not exactly meant for novices.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:22:15 PM EDT
leave it to a pro. The seals and internals have to come out/ go in a certian way. You will not know if it's good or bad till fully reassembled and in the truck. A few hundred $ parts and labor sounds about right , unless somethiing major let go. For $1400 you are near getting a new replacement trans.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:27:38 PM EDT
Automatic trannys are quite complicated, especially newer ones with all the electronics and technology that goes with them. Some things are best left to people who know what they're doing, and this is one of them - even if it costs you. While manual trannys aren't as complex, I personally wouldn't attempt a rebuild of one either.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:36:11 PM EDT
SatelliteMan: Sorry to hear that your tranny job went into the crapper. I sure wouldn't take it back to the original tranny guy, that's for the birds, he/his help messed it up. I would check around with other people who live in your community of a good, reputable tranny guy. Personally, I wouldn't do it because you probably don't have the specials, and knowledge to do it right. You won't be saving awhole lot of money, just pay someone to it, you'll probably end up saving money.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:41:35 PM EDT
If you have an automatic and the big six, it is probably the electronic version of the 700R4. Those are very strong transmissions, but not my first choice for learning about the guts of a tranny.

Valve body work is no big deal, but you need to have a good manual and good instructions with your parts kit. B+M transmission parts are geared toward the DIY hotrod crowd. I have used their valve body kits and full tranny overhaul kits with excellent results.

On your situation, offer the owner $250 toward the parts and split the labor. Probably the best yopu will get out of him.

Oh, and put an aux tranny cooler on that thing if it doesn't already have one.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:42:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 6:45:04 PM EDT by PigGuy]
What is that a 4L60E? Four speed auto, right?

ETA - Where in Ohio are you?
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:46:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PigGuy:
What is that a 4L60E? Four speed auto, right?

ETA - Where in Ohio are you?




Yes


One step under a 4L80E which is like an RV/3/4 ton tranny
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:48:37 PM EDT
I ran two transmission shops for four years, give or take... not a wrench but I've learned a few things.
1) Don't go back. He's as good as told you the breakdown is his fault and he's still going to charge you full pop. He's not your friend.
2) Find an ATRA affiliated shop. Stay away from chains. You should have gotten a longer warranty than 6/6, more like 12/12 or longer. Longer warranties may be available if you pay more.
3) Do Not Try This At Home! Trained Professional On Closed Course! If you R&I it yourself have the rebuilder drive it first and check your installation immediately afterwards.
4) Look for a GM dealer. GM rebuilt transmissions (SRTA) usually have a 36/36 warranty good at any GM dealer. Call for a price quote and compare dollars and warranties with the local shops.
5)Remember that any warranty is only as good as whoever's offering it. There are a lot of ATRA shops and GM dealers around... warranty is no good if you break down 1500 miles from Bubba's Garage, the only place the warranty is good at.
6)Tell the shop owner you are going to small claims court, because by his own admission he did substandard work. Offer to settle for a 50% refund. If he wiggles, go to court.
7)Stay away from installing a used transmission. You've already got one and don't like it.

1911fan
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 6:52:19 PM EDT
impalassforum.com/noncgi/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=7;t=015128

Impalassforum.com would be a good start, though, be weary, the LT1 was a beast, the trans was built better, but in addition, those guys beat on them, believe me, I'm one of them. Either way, I'd buy a used one before rebuilding if you're on a budget.

Vince Janis, of Janis Transmission in Akron is a master of the 200-4R, I'm sure he's good with damn near anything else too. I'm taking my Grand National's transmission there in a week or two, as soon as my torque converter arrives.
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:37:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SatelliteMan:
So how hard is rebuilding it? I've got a line on a tech manual, & the parts kits run about $180~$250. I am skilled enough to do the remove/install, but am leery of the rebuild.
Any advice is welcomed.



Most people could probably get it right after 2-5 tries
Or you could get someone that has done it more than that many times to help you
(or better yet, you could just help them)

Do you like snap rings?
(do you have a oversized press?)
Link Posted: 5/23/2005 11:40:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/23/2005 11:41:12 PM EDT by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 12:21:41 AM EDT
The hands on part of rebuilding a 4L60 is not that difficult .
What makes it difficult is little tweaks that make the build
last and getting some of the nylon seals in place without the
proper tools .

I have rebuilt hundreds of automatic tyranny’s over the years
being a professional tech because I had to . Now that I own
my own shop . I farm out trans work to a friend that specializes in it .
It isn’t that my trans work was bad . I just know that he has a talent for it .

It’s kind of like playing the piano . Anyone can learn how to do it
But only a select few will be truly great at it
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 12:38:52 AM EDT
Buy one out of the junkyard for a quarter of the rebuild price and install it yourself.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 3:06:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 3:14:07 AM EDT
How difficult? It's impossible!!! (For me anyway).


Sorry, carry on.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 3:15:57 AM EDT
well I only know of one tranny that can be rebuilt without any special tools. and thats gm's th400. which in my opinion is the best tranny ever made by anyone.

my advice is. get the best tech book you can find. which by the way is a factory tech book. read through it, see what tools are needed and what tools you can make. and go from there.

and go get another tranny just like it that is beyond repair and practice on it. thats what i do with anything that i have never done before.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 3:18:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/24/2005 3:24:40 AM EDT by MikeTx]
I can try to walk you through it if you email me. To answer your question, it's not hard to learn how to build them, the hard part is learning what to do once it's built and doesn't work right.

Parts you will need:

Overhaul kit
band
bushings
sun gear shell
torque converter
Transgo shift kit (to fix worn out TCC regulator bore) unless you have the reaming tool
Any worn hard parts

Tools needed

15 mm socket
13 mm socket
10 mm socket
8 mm socket
Bushing drivers
ring installers and sizers
volt ohm meter
Speed handle
air gun
air compressor
flat file
picks or tiny screw driver for pry tool and checking valves
Hammer
Air blower
Spring compressor
If the bell housing is the removable kind, you will need a large torx socket to take it off. I think it's a 65, but don't remember.

Electronic component resistance checks

Force motor close to 4.5 ohms
2 shift solonoids close to 22 ohms
PWM solenoid close to 11 ohms
3-2 downshift solenoid close to 22 ohms
Pressure manifold - just use the diode function to see that each switch goes from normally open to normally closed or vice-versa. There are 5 switches the computer reads here to see where you have the shifter at. Also, you should scan the computer before pulling it. Send me the codes, if any.

Regardless of what you may have heard, clearances are not all that critical. Most likely, if your unit is "going to neutral" on the 2-3 shift, then the 3-4 clutch set is fried. Set the clearance on this one set of clutches to about .040 - .060, closer to .040 is better to prevent spin up on shift. Set band clearance to about .060 travel.

Link Posted: 5/24/2005 3:50:40 AM EDT
you know that stuff you put together for your kid? the one that had all those extra parts you didnt need. well, trannys need every one of them parts put back in correctly
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 4:20:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TomJefferson:

Originally Posted By Hoppy:
Buy one out of the junkyard for a quarter of the rebuild price and install it yourself.



Good advise here.

Tj



He's already got a used trans, why get another?
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 4:25:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MikeTx:

Originally Posted By TomJefferson:

Originally Posted By Hoppy:
Buy one out of the junkyard for a quarter of the rebuild price and install it yourself.



Good advise here.

Tj



He's already got a used trans, why get another?



+1
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 5:13:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MikeTx:

Originally Posted By TomJefferson:

Originally Posted By Hoppy:
Buy one out of the junkyard for a quarter of the rebuild price and install it yourself.



Good advise here.

Tj



He's already got a used trans, why get another?




Yea, the rebuilt one did so well the last time.

How much are you going to sink into a ten year old car? A 4WD Jimmy is worth anywhere between 3 and 4.5K around here.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 8:47:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PigGuy:
What is that a 4L60E? Four speed auto, right?

ETA - Where in Ohio are you?




It is the 4L60E, 4sp. I'm in Athens Co.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 8:58:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MikeTx:
I can try to walk you through it if you email me. To answer your question, it's not hard to learn how to build them, the hard part is learning what to do once it's built and doesn't work right.

Parts you will need:

Overhaul kit
band
bushings
sun gear shell
torque converter
Transgo shift kit (to fix worn out TCC regulator bore) unless you have the reaming tool
Any worn hard parts

Tools needed

15 mm socket
13 mm socket
10 mm socket
8 mm socket
Bushing drivers
ring installers and sizers
volt ohm meter
Speed handle
air gun
air compressor
flat file
picks or tiny screw driver for pry tool and checking valves
Hammer
Air blower
Spring compressor
If the bell housing is the removable kind, you will need a large torx socket to take it off. I think it's a 65, but don't remember.

Electronic component resistance checks

Force motor close to 4.5 ohms
2 shift solonoids close to 22 ohms
PWM solenoid close to 11 ohms
3-2 downshift solenoid close to 22 ohms
Pressure manifold - just use the diode function to see that each switch goes from normally open to normally closed or vice-versa. There are 5 switches the computer reads here to see where you have the shifter at. Also, you should scan the computer before pulling it. Send me the codes, if any.

Regardless of what you may have heard, clearances are not all that critical. Most likely, if your unit is "going to neutral" on the 2-3 shift, then the 3-4 clutch set is fried. Set the clearance on this one set of clutches to about .040 - .060, closer to .040 is better to prevent spin up on shift. Set band clearance to about .060 travel.




Thanx for the offer. I *think* I may be better off to buy a remanufactured one & have my mechanic install it.

The response from the repair shop was " Well, XXX did not own/was not running the shop when yours was rebuilt. We have 'run off' the guys that did your work. They were doing poor work/not replacing parts/using used parts'.

Now, mind you, after telling me this they want $1400.00 to fix it.

If I had a way to prove they did not replace, or put in used parts I'd be taking them to court. As it is I will not reccommend them to anyone. And I deal with a lot of people in my job.
Link Posted: 5/24/2005 11:16:04 AM EDT
+1 on the ImpalaSSForum. They seem to like a rebuilder called TeamTripp in Savanah, GA. He will sell a rebuilt and beefed up transmission (nearly Corvette quality?) with a decent warranty for around $1200. I have not decided whether to go with a GM rebuild, a TeamTripp, a used, or some other rebuilt model for my dying 4L60E.

GunLvr
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