Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 10/26/2004 2:52:29 PM EST
Just curious for future reference.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:04:19 PM EST
If you are new to Financial Services the Series 7 is fairly tough...IIRC you'll need to know the ins and outs of stocks Bonds (especially Municipal) options etc..Anything below 70 is failing..I took mine on a computer. After 6 hrs and hundreds of questions you hit the submit button..It took about 30 seconds to tabulate. If I failed I would have lost my job..I got a 74
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:43:05 PM EST
Not hard, but you need a lot of time to study them, as most of the info will be completely new to you, and it's impossible to absorb it all in a short period of time.

The best way to study for it is to read the books once, then take the practice exams and look up the answers for all the ones you got wrong. I couldn't pass it until I started doing that, passed with an overall score of 78% on my first real exam.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:49:11 PM EST
At one time I held a Series 3, but now I trade just for myself.

Just like VooDoo said **...IIRC you'll need to know the ins and outs of stocks Bonds (especially Municipal) options etc..**

Study, study, study.

Anyone here trade Futures?
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:54:45 PM EST
I used to trade options on stocks but the market's not volatile enough for me to do that anymore.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 3:55:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
If you are new to Financial Services the Series 7 is fairly tough...IIRC you'll need to know the ins and outs of stocks Bonds (especially Municipal) options etc..Anything below 70 is failing..I took mine on a computer. After 6 hrs and hundreds of questions you hit the submit button..It took about 30 seconds to tabulate. If I failed I would have lost my job..I got a 74



I'm new to financial services, but am halfway done with my MBA in finance, so I'm not starting out from scratch. I'm just curious for future employment reasons.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 4:09:59 PM EST
I have a 6 and 63, the 7 is tough, the study guide I got is as big as a telephone book.
PITA. the CFP is tough, too, I know several people who have taken it. but if you study and take the practice tests you should be fine, just like anything worthwhile.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 4:25:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By raven:
I used to trade options on stocks but the market's not volatile enough for me to do that anymore.





*I used to trade options on stocks but the market's not volatile enough for me to do that anymore.*

Kewl.

Volatilty has been a bit low on S&P and ND100


I like currencies myself.

I look to trade ES/NQ everyday. Nice day on ES today ... little action on NQ however.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 4:54:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By xbigfootx:

Originally Posted By VoodooChile:
If you are new to Financial Services the Series 7 is fairly tough...IIRC you'll need to know the ins and outs of stocks Bonds (especially Municipal) options etc..Anything below 70 is failing..I took mine on a computer. After 6 hrs and hundreds of questions you hit the submit button..It took about 30 seconds to tabulate. If I failed I would have lost my job..I got a 74



I'm new to financial services, but am halfway done with my MBA in finance, so I'm not starting out from scratch. I'm just curious for future employment reasons.



I got my MBA before I got into Financial Services...As tough as the testing might be..it won't be anywhere near as tough as building a book of business from scratch. When I tried it cold-calling was allowed. How do you guys do it nowadays?
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 5:17:06 PM EST
VooDoo

Referals are the best way to get more business.

I always liked mailers ... target the affluent zip codes and personalize the letters. Make it short and professional. One page, three of four paragraphs. Nice paper (white of off white, perhaps a linen finish) with matching envelope, black ink. If you send your business card with the letter, staple it to the letter, don't use paperclips.

If this is your own business, a nice and simple logo could help.

The biggest expence is postage stamps ... I recommend NOT to use 3rd rate postage.

People today shy away with cold-calling ... however, if you're good at it, do it. Some have a knack for it, some don't.

Regards ~

Link Posted: 10/26/2004 6:30:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By icantdance:
VooDoo

Referals are the best way to get more business.

I always liked mailers ... target the affluent zip codes and personalize the letters. Make it short and professional. One page, three of four paragraphs. Nice paper (white of off white, perhaps a linen finish) with matching envelope, black ink. If you send your business card with the letter, staple it to the letter, don't use paperclips.

If this is your own business, a nice and simple logo could help.

The biggest expence is postage stamps ... I recommend NOT to use 3rd rate postage.

People today shy away with cold-calling ... however, if you're good at it, do it. Some have a knack for it, some don't.

Regards ~





I've been out for 3 years...Love the job but I couldn't make it work after 2 years of effort. Had a kid on the way so I needed something stable. Market was heading down when I needed my total assets and commissions to be heading up. Some days I miss it.
Link Posted: 10/26/2004 6:45:40 PM EST
I have my 7, 26, 63, and 65, plus I'm a CFS (Cerified Fund Specialist) and have my Life Insurance Licenses. Although I don't have my CFP, the best description of the exam came from a friend (a retired Air Force Major, with an MBA): "I'd rather do my MBA over-it was easier." The CFS is a relative walk in the park, and nowhere near as comprehensive. If you're just coming off your MBA, you may want to take a swing, while your study skills are still sharp. Just my .02.

Top Top