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Posted: 10/2/2014 5:53:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 11:58:39 AM EST by ske714]
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 5:56:59 AM EST
It didn't like that chair to much.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 5:57:33 AM EST
They paint that line on the floor for a reason. Anything that gets stuck to the magnet ain't coming off.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 5:57:44 AM EST
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Originally Posted By klutz347:
It didn't like that chair to much.
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Well, it sure wanted it bad.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 5:57:52 AM EST
There was a case in NY where an off duty cop took his pistol into a MRI Suite and it pulled the gun into the machine and caused it to discharge. Was a 1911 IIRC. Dont know if it was a proper one or one of the screwed up versions where someone redesigned perfection.

Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:00:11 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PSYWAR1-0:
There was a case in NY where an off duty cop took his pistol into a MRI Suite and it pulled the gun into the machine and caused it to discharge. Was a 1911 IIRC. Dont know if it was a proper one or one of the screwed up versions where someone redesigned perfection.

View Quote


It was a normal one in working condition with all safeties on.

The magnet pulled the firing pin forward into the primer once the gun itself couldn't get any closer.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:15:49 AM EST
http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2010/01/03/dont-bring-a-gun-near-an-mri/
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:16:27 AM EST
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:22:39 AM EST
It's such a powerful magnet it makes the very cells in your body vibrate (well the iron in them anyway), that kind of power is not to be trifled with.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:23:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.
View Quote



Same thing happen around 10 yrs ago at Westchester Medical Center, in Valhalla, NY, iirc.

Tech placed an older steel cylinder between the pt.'s legs, cut him in half lengthwise.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 6:49:18 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By phb1gt:



Same thing happen around 10 yrs ago at Westchester Medical Center, in Valhalla, NY, iirc.

Tech placed an older steel cylinder between the pt.'s legs, cut him in half lengthwise.
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Originally Posted By phb1gt:
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.



Same thing happen around 10 yrs ago at Westchester Medical Center, in Valhalla, NY, iirc.

Tech placed an older steel cylinder between the pt.'s legs, cut him in half lengthwise.

You'd think the name of the machine alone would give a pretty good clue
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:01:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.
View Quote



Beat me to that story...
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:04:27 AM EST
nom nom nom
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:40:12 AM EST
Story of a mobile MRI unit in Playa del Rey, CA (in L A County).

Snotty cop pulls up next to the trailer housing the MRI. Technician warns cop about possible damage to car. Snotty cop blows him off, leaves car for 15 minutes.

Car was towed.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:53:55 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
It's such a powerful magnet it makes the very cells in your body vibrate (well the iron in them anyway), that kind of power is not to be trifled with.
View Quote


But can it levitate a frog?


Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:00:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 9:12:43 AM EST by WildBoar]
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would hate for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:10:07 AM EST
Imagine what would happen to a patient wearing a steel butt plug.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 9:05:48 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would have for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one
View Quote

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 9:48:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By J75player:

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either
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Originally Posted By J75player:
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would have for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either


They always ask you if you've been around any metal grinding, in case you may have any in, or near your eyes. That would suck.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:09:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 10:21:27 AM EST by xviperx420]
Can't we use these for executions? Put a prisoners face just behind the wrench and then let the wrench go.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:12:31 AM EST
They are serious

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:18:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 10:18:46 AM EST by TinLeg]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By J75player:

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By J75player:
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would have for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either



I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:18:34 AM EST
That was pretty cool.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:21:27 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=92745

A 6-year-old boy died after undergoing an MRI exam at a New York-area hospital when the machine's powerful magnetic field jerked a metal oxygen tank across the room, crushing the child's head.

The force of the device's 10-ton magnet is about 30,000 times as powerful as Earth's magnetic field, and 200 times stronger than a common refrigerator magnet.


Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:25:06 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TinLeg:



I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.
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Originally Posted By TinLeg:
Originally Posted By J75player:
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would have for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either



I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.


A friend of mine had a bullet basically next to his spine, he could feel it moving when he went in one, but it didn't rip it out of his body. The movement of it caused them to take it out immediately though as to not cause anymore nerve damage.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:27:35 AM EST
They tug on my nipple rings
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:28:25 AM EST
How do they work?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:29:37 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
It's such a powerful magnet it makes the very cells in your body vibrate (well the iron in them anyway), that kind of power is not to be trifled with.
View Quote


Not the iron the atoms. How they vibrate is Based open what they are next to.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:35:03 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:44:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By J75player:

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By J75player:
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
All the ones I have seen are big donuts. It this one of the old obsolete ones? Are the open ones just as bad?

I would have for someone with screws in their neck or a plate in their head get in one

Most of that is non magnetic.
I have a large rod in my leg and several screws.
MRI is fine, and doesn't set off the detectors at the airport either



Is yours stainless or titanium? mine is stainless and I was ok in an MRI with it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:54:03 AM EST
Did some work on an MRI facility a few years back the unshielded magnet was so strong that we could stick tools on the wall outside the building
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:57:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By ske714:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BBx8BwLhqg
View Quote


Youd be in a world of hurt with some old forgotten shrapnel
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:57:58 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By phb1gt:



Same thing happen around 10 yrs ago at Westchester Medical Center, in Valhalla, NY, iirc.

Tech placed an older steel cylinder between the pt.'s legs, cut him in half lengthwise.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By phb1gt:
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.



Same thing happen around 10 yrs ago at Westchester Medical Center, in Valhalla, NY, iirc.

Tech placed an older steel cylinder between the pt.'s legs, cut him in half lengthwise.



WOW
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:58:59 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TinLeg:


I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.
View Quote


Because the tech doesn't want to make the papers. Unless I put them in myself (unlikely for an MRI tech) I'd say no way as well. It's fine for you to tell him they're non mag, but he has no way of knowing that. And grades of stainless have varying degrees of magnetic influence; very few of them are completely non mag.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:59:28 AM EST
We've lost:

O2 tanks
Ventilators
Surgical equipment
~100 pagers/cell phones
IV poles
Watches
Stethescopes
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:01:21 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By urbanredneck:



Beat me to that story...
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Originally Posted By urbanredneck:
Originally Posted By PMB1086:
I remember a case where a nurse or orderly carrying a oxygen tank (I think)entered the room where someone was getting an MRI. The tank got the pulled into the machine and killed the patient.



Beat me to that story...



Yeah..I was just looking for the orig news story footage..only found this after I got bored looking:


Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:01:58 AM EST
Generally, if your implant is anchored in bone it is OK to scan. I scan knee and hip replacements routinely looking for issues adjacent to the replacement.

Magnets are usually a no go, but there are some magnetic implants that can still be scanned under certain strict and controlled circumstances.

The open scanners are very weak compared to the video, the images suck and most implants manufactured in the past 20 years are fine for a 1.5T conventional machine anyways.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:08:06 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ultramagbrion:


Youd be in a world of hurt with some old forgotten shrapnel
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Originally Posted By ultramagbrion:
Originally Posted By ske714:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BBx8BwLhqg


Youd be in a world of hurt with some old forgotten shrapnel


That's why anyone with service history or who has worked around metal at all gets a few Xrays looked at closely before an MRI. I've had a few MRIs with my orthopedic surgeon, and based on my history he makes me get new Xrays every time just in case we missed something and got lucky the time before.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:11:28 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Flats:


Because the tech doesn't want to make the papers. Unless I put them in myself (unlikely for an MRI tech) I'd say no way as well. It's fine for you to tell him they're non mag, but he has no way of knowing that. And grades of stainless have varying degrees of magnetic influence; very few of them are completely non mag.
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Originally Posted By Flats:
Originally Posted By TinLeg:


I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.


Because the tech doesn't want to make the papers. Unless I put them in myself (unlikely for an MRI tech) I'd say no way as well. It's fine for you to tell him they're non mag, but he has no way of knowing that. And grades of stainless have varying degrees of magnetic influence; very few of them are completely non mag.



Oh I'm not complaining. I was nervous as hell when I read the Dr's orders for an MRI.

I was relieved to hear the tech say there was no way I was going in the machine.

I met the Dr. the day after. He was a bit sheepish and apologized for forgetting about my hardware.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:25:18 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TinLeg:



Oh I'm not complaining. I was nervous as hell when I read the Dr's orders for an MRI.

I was relieved to hear the tech say there was no way I was going in the machine.

I met the Dr. the day after. He was a bit sheepish and apologized for forgetting about my hardware.
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Originally Posted By TinLeg:
Originally Posted By Flats:
Originally Posted By TinLeg:


I have a complete replacement knee, rod, and several screws. On occasion it has come up and - after seeing the X-rays - the answer from the tech has always been an unequivocal "NO WAY!"


I don't know why some are different than others. I know my knee is a titanium alloy. The rods and screws are, I think, stainless.


Because the tech doesn't want to make the papers. Unless I put them in myself (unlikely for an MRI tech) I'd say no way as well. It's fine for you to tell him they're non mag, but he has no way of knowing that. And grades of stainless have varying degrees of magnetic influence; very few of them are completely non mag.



Oh I'm not complaining. I was nervous as hell when I read the Dr's orders for an MRI.

I was relieved to hear the tech say there was no way I was going in the machine.

I met the Dr. the day after. He was a bit sheepish and apologized for forgetting about my hardware.


You need to go to another facility. Knee replacement and hardware should not disqualify you from having an mri. Heck, there is even special software out the past few years to aid in scanning replacements.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:33:24 AM EST
I guess there is a reason I carry this stent card in my wallet.

I wonder if I should get a tattoo in case they don't see the card...hmmm.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:33:58 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Scooter86:

You need to go to another facility. Knee replacement and hardware should not disqualify you from having an mri. Heck, there is even special software out the past few years to aid in scanning replacements.
View Quote



This was ~15 years ago.


Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:41:36 AM EST
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Originally Posted By TinLeg:



This was ~15 years ago.


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Originally Posted By TinLeg:
Originally Posted By Scooter86:

You need to go to another facility. Knee replacement and hardware should not disqualify you from having an mri. Heck, there is even special software out the past few years to aid in scanning replacements.



This was ~15 years ago.



Ah, I see. The industry has progressed A LOT since then. Still, it is highly likely you could have had the scan even then.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:08:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DDalton:
I guess there is a reason I carry this stent card in my wallet.

I wonder if I should get a tattoo in case they don't see the card...hmmm.
View Quote



Thanks. I also have a stint card and had no idea why I was suppose to carry it. I quit carrying the little bottle of nitro pills.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:15:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Scooter86:

Ah, I see. The industry has progressed A LOT since then. Still, it is highly likely you could have had the scan even then.
View Quote



I guess I don't know what the specific dangers are - other than having a piece of metal stuck to the side of the machine.


Which sounds... excruciating, when that piece of metal is inside your leg.


I was under the impression there was still some danger even from non-ferrous metal.


Is that incorrect?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:19:12 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Silverbulletz06:
We've lost:

O2 tanks
Ventilators
Surgical equipment
~100 pagers/cell phones
IV poles
Watches
Stethescopes
View Quote
Lost them? Did you look inside the machine?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:22:03 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TinLeg:



I guess I don't know what the specific dangers are - other than having a piece of metal stuck to the side of the machine.


Which sounds... excruciating, when that piece of metal is inside your leg.


I was under the impression there was still some danger even from non-ferrous metal.


Is that incorrect?
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Originally Posted By TinLeg:
Originally Posted By Scooter86:

Ah, I see. The industry has progressed A LOT since then. Still, it is highly likely you could have had the scan even then.



I guess I don't know what the specific dangers are - other than having a piece of metal stuck to the side of the machine.


Which sounds... excruciating, when that piece of metal is inside your leg.


I was under the impression there was still some danger even from non-ferrous metal.


Is that incorrect?
Yes, there could be some issues but not from the field but rather from the radio frequency energy. There can also be issues with imaging due to these effects.

In the MRI, the magnetic field "holds" the hydrogen atoms, then they are blasted by RF which causes them to flip in the magnetic field, when the RF stops, the hydrogen atoms flip back, and in doing so, emit very specific RF which varies according to the chemical compounds containing the hydrogen.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:39:47 PM EST
Dam, I've got metal plates & screws in my arm and leg.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:41:19 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By scrum:


That's why anyone with service history or who has worked around metal at all gets a few Xrays looked at closely before an MRI. I've had a few MRIs with my orthopedic surgeon, and based on my history he makes me get new Xrays every time just in case we missed something and got lucky the time before.
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Originally Posted By scrum:
Originally Posted By ultramagbrion:
Originally Posted By ske714:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BBx8BwLhqg


Youd be in a world of hurt with some old forgotten shrapnel


That's why anyone with service history or who has worked around metal at all gets a few Xrays looked at closely before an MRI. I've had a few MRIs with my orthopedic surgeon, and based on my history he makes me get new Xrays every time just in case we missed something and got lucky the time before.

In case they missed something? Wouldn't the MRI you went through have "caught" anything missed in the XRAY?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:46:49 PM EST
So, I guess I shouldn't have my mechanical watch on my wrist when I get my next MRI, then?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:48:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 12:48:45 PM EST by Dace]
I once left a stainless steel cross necklace on during an MRI test on my knee. Nothing happened.

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