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Posted: 6/21/2016 11:38:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 12:17:55 AM EDT by scuba_steve]
Save your bullet.


Good dog. Beagle/hound mix that belongs to my daughter and who spends a lot of time at my place when my daughter is working. We don't have any other pets and neither does my daughter. Daughter rescued her at one year-old and it is six months later and we have had no luck with this issue. The dog doesn't have a mean bone in its body. Loves to play and loves us, but she just doesn't get that we don't like to be bitten when she is excited.

We all love this dog, but something has to change. We're reading stuff and may actually try a professional, but I was hoping some GD dog whisperers might be able to share some wisdom. Shit recently hit the fan, so I am pretty much asking for advice everywhere.

Thanks. Insert abuse below.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:40:48 PM EDT
Re-think. Good dogs don't bite.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:41:30 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By DnPRK:
Re-think. Good dogs don't bite.
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FPNI.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:42:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/21/2016 11:42:25 PM EDT by BoRdErBaCoN]
My Beagle is extremely territorial - we're going through the same thing. He has bit the other dog, he bit one of the cats...

We're keeping him on a short leash and under watchful eye since the baby was born. (9 month old daughter).

He's 6 - and a great dog - but one wrong move with her and the game will change abruptly - and not in his favor.

Good luck OP.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:43:09 PM EDT
Get a better dog.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:43:33 PM EDT
mouthing..
is not biting.

a lot of dogs mouth when excited and are playing. its canine behavior.

bites-hard snaps with growling cause pain
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:44:42 PM EDT
.

Bitter apple. When she tries to bite that she won't like it.

Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:45:06 PM EDT
Have you tried grabbing her by the muzzle when she's trying to bite and tell her no? My heeler was excitable like that when she was a pup. Worked well on her, She was an extremely smart dog.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:46:50 PM EDT
So a rough player is is what I am getting. Had a Dachshund like that one time. Never broke her of it since she was more stubborn that I am. Yet that is the Hound in her. Smart as shit yet just as stubborn. Yet when I had her they didn't have the shock collars that are out there now that in theory can be used to correct this. Just depends on how stubborn she is.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:47:30 PM EDT
We have a dog that started this way. Every time he bit I'd stick my thumb under his tongue and hold him like a bass for a minute. They can't bite down when you do it and don't enjoy it. Doesn't hurt him but within a couple days got the idea that people weren't something he wanted in his mouth.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:48:30 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By OKnativeson:
mouthing..
is not biting.

a lot of dogs mouth when excited and are playing. its canine behavior.

bites-hard snaps with growling cause pain
View Quote



Yeah, it sounds like that. There is no growling or aggressive behavior, pretty much ever. It's also not a hard snap. The dog is typically happy and excited when this is going on, trying to get us to throw a ball or something. But I haven't experienced this with other dogs. Not sure if it's the breed or how it was socialized before it was rescued.

Thanks for the word.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:49:41 PM EDT
When dog gets excited let it release energy on a toy. Get the dog trained to bite a toy. Never play with any animal with your hands, they become toys to them and learn to bite.

After the dog is tired of the toy, give it a treat.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:50:56 PM EDT
Shoot it.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:50:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Stillhooky:
We have a dog that started this way. Every time he bit I'd stick my thumb under his tongue and hold him like a bass for a minute. They can't bite down when you do it and don't enjoy it. Doesn't hurt him but within a couple days got the idea that people weren't something he wanted in his mouth.
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Yup. The bass hold worked for my Lab. Siracha hot sauce is good too.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:58:46 PM EDT
Based on your post, it sounds like play biting. I got my german shepherd puppy to stop play biting by simply stopping the play and walking away. He got the idea pretty quickly and quit doing it.
Link Posted: 6/21/2016 11:59:44 PM EDT
At this point, getting rid of the dog does not seem like an option. My daughter loves it more than life....and even though my wife claims she still loves me more, I have my doubts.

Thanks for the ideas. I will list out the serious ones and review with the family. Shock collar has already come up. Just wasn't sure how effective it would be for something like this.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:02:43 AM EDT
When the dog puts his mouth on your hand/arm, shove it as deep into the dogs mouth as you can. He will let go as he does not like this, and will learn to stop putting you in its mouth.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:05:11 AM EDT
How is his behavior corrected now?
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:07:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 12:20:50 AM EDT by scuba_steve]
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Originally Posted By Seydou:
How is his behavior corrected now?
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We pretty much all get stern and yell NO and stop interacting with her. She doesn't seem to get it.


ETA: Other times it's just that you are walking in the door after work and she is excited to see you. Sometimes when she is engaging with you then, there is this "mouthing." In that case we have all decided to stop and turn around, facing away from her and ignoring her. That ends the party, but I have no idea if this is even close to what we should be doing.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:08:37 AM EDT
My first Lab was a mouthy one. What we did is stop all play, grab her snout and hold her jaws together, exclaim "NO BITE" or "NO" in a very loud fierce voice and look directly in her eyes.

If it got really bad we'd flip her over onto her back like an older alpha dog would, growl at her, then let her up and shun her for a few minutes.

She eventually saw mouthing/biting as Not Fun Anymore and stopped.

She ended up so gentle about it we could slide her tongue out of her mouth like unrolling a windowshade and all she'd do is look depressed LOL.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:09:33 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Danner130:
Get a better dog.
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This.

Stop putting human emotions onto a fucking animal that you call a pet.

It's a DOG. Get a better one.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:26:07 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By OKnativeson:
mouthing..
is not biting.

a lot of dogs mouth when excited and are playing. its canine behavior.

bites-hard snaps with growling cause pain
View Quote

This.

There are a couple ways to stop it. Either be dramatic (as in holler OW!!! even if it doesn't really hurt). It does work, because they don't want to hurt you they just want to play but you may get a nick or two before they catch on. Or when the dog puts it's teeth on your hand, push IN until the gag and hold it for a couple seconds - they don't like that at all. Again, you might get a nick/scrape or two.

Or bitter apple spray on your hands. I did have a dog that liked the taste though, so YMMV.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:30:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By tactical221:
Shoot it.
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Originally Posted By tactical221:
Shoot it.



You should review the COC Addendum.

Here's the relevant section for you:
Pet Threads: Intentionally disrupting threads discussing member's pets will result in an account lock. If you have difficulty figuring out what "disrupting" a pet thread means, then you should probably avoid posting in them.

Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:31:17 AM EDT
Dogs interact with the world with their mouths the way we do with our hands. Their version of rough housing includes play biting. They learn to temper their bite when their playmates yelp when the bite is too hard.

Any teeth on human skin is too hard. When any of you feel teeth, let out a yelp and stop playing with the dog for a moment.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:31:45 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By scuba_steve:



We pretty much all get stern and yell NO and stop interacting with her. She doesn't seem to get it.


ETA: Other times it's just that you are walking in the door after work and she is excited to see you. Sometimes when she is engaging with you then, there is this "mouthing." In that case we have all decided to stop and turn around, facing away from her and ignoring her. That ends the party, but I have no idea if this is even close to what we should be doing.
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Originally Posted By scuba_steve:
Originally Posted By Seydou:
How is his behavior corrected now?



We pretty much all get stern and yell NO and stop interacting with her. She doesn't seem to get it.


ETA: Other times it's just that you are walking in the door after work and she is excited to see you. Sometimes when she is engaging with you then, there is this "mouthing." In that case we have all decided to stop and turn around, facing away from her and ignoring her. That ends the party, but I have no idea if this is even close to what we should be doing.

YES! That will work.

Immediately after she calms down and starts displaying wanted behavior, give her a treat to reinforce it.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:33:23 AM EDT
We have a border collie-aussie mix who when younger liked to bite and even killed a few chickens.

I decided to try an electronic/shock collar, I had to melt her down a few times, but she doesn't bite anymore and gets along fine with the hens.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:50:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By kar98k:
.

Bitter apple. When she tries to bite that she won't like it.

View Quote


when she inappropirately bites spray this in her mouth spray it also on objects you don't want her chewing on
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:51:46 AM EDT
Bite her back....hard.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:55:12 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By scuba_steve:



We pretty much all get stern and yell NO and stop interacting with her. She doesn't seem to get it.


ETA: Other times it's just that you are walking in the door after work and she is excited to see you. Sometimes when she is engaging with you then, there is this "mouthing." In that case we have all decided to stop and turn around, facing away from her and ignoring her. That ends the party, but I have no idea if this is even close to what we should be doing.
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Originally Posted By scuba_steve:
Originally Posted By Seydou:
How is his behavior corrected now?



We pretty much all get stern and yell NO and stop interacting with her. She doesn't seem to get it.


ETA: Other times it's just that you are walking in the door after work and she is excited to see you. Sometimes when she is engaging with you then, there is this "mouthing." In that case we have all decided to stop and turn around, facing away from her and ignoring her. That ends the party, but I have no idea if this is even close to what we should be doing.

That's thw right start but if it's not effectuve needs to be reinforced physically. Many good suggestions on that so far, cram hand down throat while saying no, fishhook their lower jaw, hold mouth closed, asserting alpha. Needs to be accompanied by immediate loud vocalization as soon as anyone feels teeth.

I'm a little concerned with your use of the term nipping though. Thats a quick bite usually with a bit of a lunge at you. That should not be tolerated.

Further just dont get the dog so excited. When people walk in the door ignore her or tell her to lay down or go to the bed/crate or whatever her spot is, no excited talk no petting nothing if she gets close give command. Don't play with her the same ruffhouse way, throw a toy or just take for a long structured walk where the dog must heel.

This is pretty common to deal with when they are pups but should have been nipped in the bud very early on. Beagles kinda make crap pets though they are bred to hunt not be a stuffed animal.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:57:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By 32DOHC:
Bite her back....hard.
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You make the face but this sometimes works with a dog that thinks it is in charge. It's about the only thing that works with an asshole cat.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 12:59:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 1:00:42 AM EDT by 32DOHC]
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Originally Posted By Obo2:

You make the face but this sometimes works with a dog that thinks it is in charge. It's about the only thing that works with an asshole cat.
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Originally Posted By Obo2:
Originally Posted By 32DOHC:
Bite her back....hard.

You make the face but this sometimes works with a dog that thinks it is in charge. It's about the only thing that works with an asshole cat.


I know..I did that once or twice with my puppy GSD.

Sometimes you gotta get creative.

Ignoring worked well too.

OP, assert your dominance.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 1:00:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By scuba_steve:
Save your bullet.
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Broadheads are reusable

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 1:01:55 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By OKnativeson:
mouthing..
is not biting.

a lot of dogs mouth when excited and are playing. its canine behavior.

bites-hard snaps with growling cause pain
View Quote

In the greyhound community, "nitting" (nibbling at shirt and jacket hems, sleeves and occassionally the arm or whatever underneath) and "wolfing" (soft-mouth holding) is well understood as a sign of the dog's affection.

At work, I have a client giant malamute girl that likes to gently take my hand with her mouth and walk with me across the room, as does my own greyhound girl. ... "Lassie" wouldn't have ever been able to save anyone, if she didn't lead her humans around by the hand ;-)

A well socialized puppy learns bite inhibition by 3 months, but you should be reinforcing that during play, etc. Some good reading: http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/teaching-bite-inhibition
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 3:28:44 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
Dogs interact with the world with their mouths the way we do with our hands. Their version of rough housing includes play biting. They learn to temper their bite when their playmates yelp when the bite is too hard.

Any teeth on human skin is too hard. When any of you feel teeth, let out a yelp and stop playing with the dog for a moment.
View Quote



This.

Used this technique on 4 different dogs now, worked every time.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 3:52:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Stillhooky:
We have a dog that started this way. Every time he bit I'd stick my thumb under his tongue and hold him like a bass for a minute. They can't bite down when you do it and don't enjoy it. Doesn't hurt him but within a couple days got the idea that people weren't something he wanted in his mouth.
View Quote



I did something similar with our beagle when I was a teenager. She learned even before that, that an "ow" was pain, came over and sheepishly licked my 'wound' with a look that showed concern. A scratch behind the ears let her know it was ok.

Its still a young, excitable dog. Give it time and lots of interaction to learn with.
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 8:56:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 8:59:18 AM EDT by 9divdoc]
Everytime he wants to bit or chew on you give him a chew toy...rawhide etc to chew on instead.
When he bites you give a command "no bite" works fine....then the appropriate chew object is put in his mouth...pat on the head with a "good boy"....for reinforcement.

Biting is self reinforcing behavior...dogs love to bite...the more they bite an object and interact positively with the object (reinforcement) the more they will bite...
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 9:00:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2016 9:09:31 AM EDT by 9divdoc]
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Originally Posted By Howlin_Mad:



This.

Used this technique on 4 different dogs now, worked every time.
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Originally Posted By Howlin_Mad:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
Dogs interact with the world with their mouths the way we do with our hands. Their version of rough housing includes play biting. They learn to temper their bite when their playmates yelp when the bite is too hard.

Any teeth on human skin is too hard. When any of you feel teeth, let out a yelp and stop playing with the dog for a moment.



This.

Used this technique on 4 different dogs now, worked every time.


This works well on many dogs...not all...but a great technique to start with....

The problem with negative reinforcers (punishment) is the bleeding over into other behaviors you might want or need..."trust" for example...

The best training with pups depends on their age (their particular stage of development)...there are windows of opportunity for both positive and negative learning at each stage of development.

You can create fears they never get over (traumatize) or trust they will never loose.

The best reinforcers (imo) are those that mimic what pups teach each other or what their mothers or elders would teach them in the pack (wolves and wild dogs)

So the yelping in pain and breaking off of social interaction should be a good one...when you squirt them in mouth with bitter apple...the hand, the bottle, the handler also become objects associate
with unpleasantness...at least yell no bite or even just NO!...

Problem is both reward and punishment have their greatest effects in immediacy...wait to long for either reward or punishment and the pup will have already forgotten what it was he did right or wrong.

Never loose an opportunity for correction...its ok for them to screw up because it is in the immediate correction of mistakes they learn
Link Posted: 6/22/2016 9:01:39 AM EDT
i use mouth spray, causes no harm gets the point across.
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