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Posted: 9/8/2004 11:38:18 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:43:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2004 11:44:05 AM EST by Blued-Steel]
What brand solar lantern is that?
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:45:06 AM EST
move to indiana until halloween ;)
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:48:08 AM EST
Reminds me of this:


It's hurricane season, best to be prepared. We have entered the hurricane season. Every day for the next several months, you'll turn on the TV to see a weather person pointing to some radar blob out in the Atlantic Ocean and making two basic meteorological points:

(1) There is no need to panic.
(2) We could all be killed! 

Yes, hurricane season is an exciting time to be in Florida. If you're new to the area, you're probably wondering what you need to do to prepare for the possibility that we'll get hit by "the big one." Based on our experiences, we recommend that you follow this simple three-step hurricane preparedness plan:

STEP 1: Buy enough food and bottled water to last your family for at least three days
STEP 2: Put these supplies into your car.
STEP 3: Drive to Nebraska and remain there until Halloween.

Unfortunately, statistics show that most people will not follow this sensible plan. Most people will foolishly stay here in Florida. We'll start with one of the most important hurricane preparedness items:

HOMEOWNERS' INSURANCE:
If you own a home, you must have hurricane insurance. Fortunately, this insurance is cheap and easy to get, as long as your home meets two basic requirements:

(1) It is reasonably well-built, and
(2) It is located in Nebraska.

Unfortunately, if your home is located in Florida, or any other area that might actually be hit by a hurricane, most insurance companies would prefer not to sell you hurricane insurance, because then they might be required to pay YOU money, and that is certainly not why they got into the insurance business in the first place. So you'll have to scrounge around for an insurance company, which will charge you an annual premium roughly equal to the replacement value of your house. At any moment, this company can drop you like used dental floss. Since Hurricane Andrew, most Floridians have had an estimated 27 different home-insurance companies. This week, I'm covered by the Bob and Big Stan Insurance Co., under a policy which states that, in addition to my premium, Bob and Big Stan are entitled, on demand, to my kidneys.

SHUTTERS:
Your house should have hurricane shutters on all the windows, all the doors, and -- if it's a major hurricane -- all the toilets. There are several types of shutters, with advantages and disadvantages:

Plywood shutters: The advantage is that, because you make them yourself, they're cheap. The disadvantage is that, because you make them yourself, they will fall off.

Sheet-metal shutters: The advantage is that these work well, once you get them all up. The disadvantage is that once you get them all up, your hands will be useless bleeding stumps, and it will be December. Roll-down
shutters: The advantages are that they're very easy to use, and will definitely protect your house. The disadvantage is that you will have to sell your house to pay for them.

Hurricane-proof windows: These are the newest wrinkle in hurricane protection. They look like ordinary windows, but they can withstand hurricane winds! You can be sure of this, because the salesman says so. He lives in Nebraska.

HURRICANE PROOFING YOUR PROPERTY:
As the hurricane approaches, check your yard for movable objects like barbecue grills, planters, patio furniture, visiting relatives, etc. You should, as a precaution, throw these items into your swimming pool (if you don't have a swimming pool, you should have one built immediately).
Otherwise, the hurricane winds will turn these objects into deadly missiles.

EVACUATION ROUTE:
If you live in a low-lying area, you should have an evacuation route planned out. (To determine whether you live in a low-lying area, look at your driver's license; if it says "Florida," you live in a low-lying area). The purpose of having an evacuation route is to avoid being trapped in your home
when a major storm hits. Instead, you will be trapped in a gigantic traffic jam several miles from your home, along with two hundred thousand other evacuees. So, as a bonus, you will not be lonely.

HURRICANE SUPPLIES:
If you don't evacuate, you will need a mess of supplies. Do not buy them now! Florida tradition requires that you wait until the last possible minute, then go to the supermarket and get into vicious fights with strangers over who gets the last can of SPAM. In addition to food and water, you will need the following supplies:

• 23 flashlights. At least $167 worth of batteries that, when the power goes off, turn out to be the wrong size for the flashlights.
• Bleach. (No, I don't know what the bleach is for. NOBODY knows what the bleach is for, but it's traditional, so GET some!)
• 55 gallon drum of underarm deodorant.
• A big knife that you can strap to your leg. (This will be useless in a hurricane, but it looks cool.) • A large quantity of raw chicken, to placate the alligators. (Ask anybody who went through Andrew; after the hurricane, there WILL be irate alligators.)
• $35,000 in cash or diamonds so that, after the hurricane passes, you can buy a generator from a man with no discernible teeth.

Of course these are just basic precautions. As the hurricane draws near, it is vitally important that you keep abreast of the situation by turning on your television and watching TV reporters in rain slickers standing right next to the ocean and tell you over and over how vitally important it is for everybody to stay away from the ocean.

Good luck, and remember: It's great living in Paradise.


Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:53:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:53:36 AM EST
((clap))((clap))((clap)) Excellant work Steyr!!

Explanation w/ pics...great work!

I am still trying figure out how to wire my portable generator to the fuse box. Gonna call an electrician tomorrow.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:54:37 AM EST

Originally Posted By BlammO:
Reminds me of this:


It's hurricane season, best to be prepared. We have entered the hurricane season. Every day for the next several months, you'll turn on the TV to see a weather person pointing to some radar blob out in the Atlantic Ocean and making two basic meteorological points:

(1) There is no need to panic.
(2) We could all be killed! 

Yes, hurricane season is an exciting time to be in Florida. If you're new to the area, you're probably wondering what you need to do to prepare for the possibility that we'll get hit by "the big one." Based on our experiences, we recommend that you follow this simple three-step hurricane preparedness plan:

STEP 1: Buy enough food and bottled water to last your family for at least three days
STEP 2: Put these supplies into your car.
STEP 3: Drive to Nebraska and remain there until Halloween.

Unfortunately, statistics show that most people will not follow this sensible plan. Most people will foolishly stay here in Florida. We'll start with one of the most important hurricane preparedness items:

HOMEOWNERS' INSURANCE:
If you own a home, you must have hurricane insurance. Fortunately, this insurance is cheap and easy to get, as long as your home meets two basic requirements:

(1) It is reasonably well-built, and
(2) It is located in Nebraska.

Unfortunately, if your home is located in Florida, or any other area that might actually be hit by a hurricane, most insurance companies would prefer not to sell you hurricane insurance, because then they might be required to pay YOU money, and that is certainly not why they got into the insurance business in the first place. So you'll have to scrounge around for an insurance company, which will charge you an annual premium roughly equal to the replacement value of your house. At any moment, this company can drop you like used dental floss. Since Hurricane Andrew, most Floridians have had an estimated 27 different home-insurance companies. This week, I'm covered by the Bob and Big Stan Insurance Co., under a policy which states that, in addition to my premium, Bob and Big Stan are entitled, on demand, to my kidneys.

SHUTTERS:
Your house should have hurricane shutters on all the windows, all the doors, and -- if it's a major hurricane -- all the toilets. There are several types of shutters, with advantages and disadvantages:

Plywood shutters: The advantage is that, because you make them yourself, they're cheap. The disadvantage is that, because you make them yourself, they will fall off.

Sheet-metal shutters: The advantage is that these work well, once you get them all up. The disadvantage is that once you get them all up, your hands will be useless bleeding stumps, and it will be December. Roll-down
shutters: The advantages are that they're very easy to use, and will definitely protect your house. The disadvantage is that you will have to sell your house to pay for them.

Hurricane-proof windows: These are the newest wrinkle in hurricane protection. They look like ordinary windows, but they can withstand hurricane winds! You can be sure of this, because the salesman says so. He lives in Nebraska.

HURRICANE PROOFING YOUR PROPERTY:
As the hurricane approaches, check your yard for movable objects like barbecue grills, planters, patio furniture, visiting relatives, etc. You should, as a precaution, throw these items into your swimming pool (if you don't have a swimming pool, you should have one built immediately).
Otherwise, the hurricane winds will turn these objects into deadly missiles.

EVACUATION ROUTE:
If you live in a low-lying area, you should have an evacuation route planned out. (To determine whether you live in a low-lying area, look at your driver's license; if it says "Florida," you live in a low-lying area). The purpose of having an evacuation route is to avoid being trapped in your home
when a major storm hits. Instead, you will be trapped in a gigantic traffic jam several miles from your home, along with two hundred thousand other evacuees. So, as a bonus, you will not be lonely.

HURRICANE SUPPLIES:
If you don't evacuate, you will need a mess of supplies. Do not buy them now! Florida tradition requires that you wait until the last possible minute, then go to the supermarket and get into vicious fights with strangers over who gets the last can of SPAM. In addition to food and water, you will need the following supplies:

• 23 flashlights. At least $167 worth of batteries that, when the power goes off, turn out to be the wrong size for the flashlights.
• Bleach. (No, I don't know what the bleach is for. NOBODY knows what the bleach is for, but it's traditional, so GET some!)
• 55 gallon drum of underarm deodorant.
• A big knife that you can strap to your leg. (This will be useless in a hurricane, but it looks cool.) • A large quantity of raw chicken, to placate the alligators. (Ask anybody who went through Andrew; after the hurricane, there WILL be irate alligators.)
• $35,000 in cash or diamonds so that, after the hurricane passes, you can buy a generator from a man with no discernible teeth.

Of course these are just basic precautions. As the hurricane draws near, it is vitally important that you keep abreast of the situation by turning on your television and watching TV reporters in rain slickers standing right next to the ocean and tell you over and over how vitally important it is for everybody to stay away from the ocean.

Good luck, and remember: It's great living in Paradise.





My sides are hurting now...


Glad you made it, SA.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 11:57:56 AM EST

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Originally Posted By BlammO:
Reminds me of this:


It's hurricane season, best to be prepared. We have entered the hurricane season. Every day for the next several months, you'll turn on the TV to see a weather person pointing to some radar blob out in the Atlantic Ocean and making two basic meteorological points:

(1) There is no need to panic.
(2) We could all be killed! 

Yes, hurricane season is an exciting time to be in Florida. If you're new to the area, you're probably wondering what you need to do to prepare for the possibility that we'll get hit by "the big one." Based on our experiences, we recommend that you follow this simple three-step hurricane preparedness plan:

STEP 1: Buy enough food and bottled water to last your family for at least three days
STEP 2: Put these supplies into your car.
STEP 3: Drive to Nebraska and remain there until Halloween.

Unfortunately, statistics show that most people will not follow this sensible plan. Most people will foolishly stay here in Florida. We'll start with one of the most important hurricane preparedness items:

HOMEOWNERS' INSURANCE:
If you own a home, you must have hurricane insurance. Fortunately, this insurance is cheap and easy to get, as long as your home meets two basic requirements:

(1) It is reasonably well-built, and
(2) It is located in Nebraska.

Unfortunately, if your home is located in Florida, or any other area that might actually be hit by a hurricane, most insurance companies would prefer not to sell you hurricane insurance, because then they might be required to pay YOU money, and that is certainly not why they got into the insurance business in the first place. So you'll have to scrounge around for an insurance company, which will charge you an annual premium roughly equal to the replacement value of your house. At any moment, this company can drop you like used dental floss. Since Hurricane Andrew, most Floridians have had an estimated 27 different home-insurance companies. This week, I'm covered by the Bob and Big Stan Insurance Co., under a policy which states that, in addition to my premium, Bob and Big Stan are entitled, on demand, to my kidneys.

SHUTTERS:
Your house should have hurricane shutters on all the windows, all the doors, and -- if it's a major hurricane -- all the toilets. There are several types of shutters, with advantages and disadvantages:

Plywood shutters: The advantage is that, because you make them yourself, they're cheap. The disadvantage is that, because you make them yourself, they will fall off.

Sheet-metal shutters: The advantage is that these work well, once you get them all up. The disadvantage is that once you get them all up, your hands will be useless bleeding stumps, and it will be December. Roll-down
shutters: The advantages are that they're very easy to use, and will definitely protect your house. The disadvantage is that you will have to sell your house to pay for them.

Hurricane-proof windows: These are the newest wrinkle in hurricane protection. They look like ordinary windows, but they can withstand hurricane winds! You can be sure of this, because the salesman says so. He lives in Nebraska.

HURRICANE PROOFING YOUR PROPERTY:
As the hurricane approaches, check your yard for movable objects like barbecue grills, planters, patio furniture, visiting relatives, etc. You should, as a precaution, throw these items into your swimming pool (if you don't have a swimming pool, you should have one built immediately).
Otherwise, the hurricane winds will turn these objects into deadly missiles.

EVACUATION ROUTE:
If you live in a low-lying area, you should have an evacuation route planned out. (To determine whether you live in a low-lying area, look at your driver's license; if it says "Florida," you live in a low-lying area). The purpose of having an evacuation route is to avoid being trapped in your home
when a major storm hits. Instead, you will be trapped in a gigantic traffic jam several miles from your home, along with two hundred thousand other evacuees. So, as a bonus, you will not be lonely.

HURRICANE SUPPLIES:
If you don't evacuate, you will need a mess of supplies. Do not buy them now! Florida tradition requires that you wait until the last possible minute, then go to the supermarket and get into vicious fights with strangers over who gets the last can of SPAM. In addition to food and water, you will need the following supplies:

• 23 flashlights. At least $167 worth of batteries that, when the power goes off, turn out to be the wrong size for the flashlights.
• Bleach. (No, I don't know what the bleach is for. NOBODY knows what the bleach is for, but it's traditional, so GET some!)
• 55 gallon drum of underarm deodorant.
• A big knife that you can strap to your leg. (This will be useless in a hurricane, but it looks cool.) • A large quantity of raw chicken, to placate the alligators. (Ask anybody who went through Andrew; after the hurricane, there WILL be irate alligators.)
• $35,000 in cash or diamonds so that, after the hurricane passes, you can buy a generator from a man with no discernible teeth.

Of course these are just basic precautions. As the hurricane draws near, it is vitally important that you keep abreast of the situation by turning on your television and watching TV reporters in rain slickers standing right next to the ocean and tell you over and over how vitally important it is for everybody to stay away from the ocean.

Good luck, and remember: It's great living in Paradise.





My sides are hurting now...


Glad you made it, SA.


Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:30:01 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:43:24 PM EST
I'll bump again because you did a fantastic job of thinking this through and posting the info in a very user-friendly way. I'll add this to my archives.

Glad you survived Francis. Sorry for the hijack.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:00:17 PM EST
I'll be more prepared ala Steyr AUG next year. After Andrew, I now take things much more seriously. I was 23 back then and had no family. Now I have a wife and two young daughters to protect. We survived Frances without a problem. No electric for 2 days (although my neighbors just west of us had zero power interruptions.) A generator is on the top of the list along with a shaker unit. The breeze inside the house was nice, but in the aftermath of an "Andrew" AC would be really nice.

We ate at Sonny's Sunday night and 10 minutes after we got home, the power returned.
We were lucky this time. Next time it could be worse. Much worse.

HS1
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:06:47 PM EST
Thanks for all of the tips! I will rememeber them if I ever move back to a hurricane state. Were getting ready for cold weather he in MO. Let it snow!
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:07:12 PM EST
Those of us in South Florida (Dade & Broward counties) got real lucy with Charlie and Frances but Ivan is still out there. I was in Dade during Andrew and had no water for 11 days and no electricity for 14 days. The house was shuttered tightly so it survived.

Three days after Andrew I remember having to drive up north to Boca (50+ miles) with $200 in my pocket and 4 large ice chest to buy water and ice. First store I found open (in Dania) wanted $5 for a bag of ice. Second place I found open was a Pizza Hut and the manager wanted $30 to fill each ice chest with ice. Finally went up north and found Burger King where the manager filled all 4 ice chest with ice for nothing and gave me a cup of coke. Finally got back home after about 10 hours with 4 ice chest full of ice and about 40 gallons of water. Neighbors appreciated the ice and water. Oh yeah, I got a tank of gas too.

Now, every spring I stock up on enough food and water for 15 days for my family (me, wife and 2 dogs) and have everything ready to bug out in 1 hour or less (need to prepare all importanrt documents, personal papers, pics of the house inside and out on CD's, etc.). I had the house secured with shutters and had everything put away from the outside in 3 hours. Finally, I keep about $500-$600 in small bills in the safe.

Need to be prepared to live in paradise.


Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:09:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/8/2004 3:09:52 PM EST by atomicferret]
Did you run into any situations where that MP5 justified its cost? I hope not. Glad to see you survived.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:10:00 PM EST
Does anyone get ice blocks and keep a freezer full of them?
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:12:05 PM EST
No one has asked yet? Where's the action report
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:15:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
Does anyone get ice blocks and keep a freezer full of them?



No it is better to freeze jugs ahead of time.
Then they don't leak and you can drink them if they thaw.

Bob

Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:16:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By peekay:
No one has asked yet? Where's the action report



When I was preparing for Frances last week, my wife wanted to know where her pistols was (a Browning Hi-Power) and my shotgun
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:20:05 PM EST

Originally Posted By CFII:
move to indiana until halloween ;)



+1
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:24:38 PM EST

Originally posted by peekay:
No one has asked yet? Where's the action report



Late Saturday night some guy decides to pound at my door. Since the power was out, I couldn't see him through the peephole. Figuring it was better to answer the door than to let the guy assume nobody was home, I opened the door. The light from my M3 lit him up real nice and startled him quite a bit. He responded with, " Oh, i'm sorry. I can't get my friends house right." He quickly left once he noticed my presence and large stature. It's funny though, he had no idea the light was attached to my G17. This admittance would have been better had he been more persistant in entering my home. He was lucky. Next time, maybe I won't answer the door just to see what might happen next!

HS1
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:34:22 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:39:35 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 9:26:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
It takes an amazing piece of shit to try and steal generators from people FOLLOWING a hurricane. I wish we had gotten them.



Why buy things and prepare when you can just steal it? That's the attitude of people who won't plan ahead for anything their entire lives.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 9:37:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By atomicferret:
Did you run into any situations where that MP5 justified its cost? I hope not. Glad to see you survived.



Yes I did. Just having it available and the piece of mind that brought was worth every penny.

An added bonus was one night before I went outside the wife grabbed one of the other MP5s, stuck a hot mag in it and slung it before coming outside behind me.


PICS!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 9:49:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/9/2004 9:52:46 AM EST by M1-Matt]

Originally Posted By sixgunsblazing:

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:

Originally Posted By atomicferret:
Did you run into any situations where that MP5 justified its cost? I hope not. Glad to see you survived.



Yes I did. Just having it available and the piece of mind that brought was worth every penny.

An added bonus was one night before I went outside the wife grabbed one of the other MP5s, stuck a hot mag in it and slung it before coming outside behind me.


PICS!!!!!





BTW SteyrAUG this is a great post. This info is valuable even for thoes who do not live in a Hurricane Area.
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 11:42:52 AM EST

Tag.


Bigfeet
Link Posted: 9/13/2004 10:13:05 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 1:36:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 1:53:40 PM EST
Tag
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 5:39:26 PM EST

Fire in the hole!


Bigfeet
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