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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/7/2005 9:49:50 AM EDT
I was having a problem with my lawn sprinkler system not functioning very good due to low water pressure. A sprinkler guy came to my house and turned up the pressure to about 70 PSI, which fixed the sprinkler issue. However, inside my house, now the water comes out of the faucets and shower with tremendous force. I'm kinda worried the pressure may be too high and bust a water pipe or something.

Does anyone know the rule of thumb for maximum water pressure for a typical house?

Note: My house was built in 2001.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:50:36 AM EDT
Just had that problem and set mine to 50
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:55:35 AM EDT
You have copper or plastic pipes???
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:02:21 AM EDT
Depending on the condition of your plumbing and type, it depends, but I'd say 70 is getting a tad high.

I'd throttle that back to 50-60 at the most.

You DON'T want to find out that 70 was.... "Oops, too much"

Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:05:54 AM EDT
The pipes themselves are not the weak point, the fixtures at the end of the pipe will start showing overpressure signs before a pipe will just flat out burst.

Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:06:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat: Does anyone know the rule of thumb for maximum water pressure for a typical house?
A question like that is a sure sign that something's wrong!
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:11:13 AM EDT
70 psi is high. If you are going to leave it like that, would strongly recommend you replace washing machine hoses. Get some that are wrapped with braided wire. Available at better hardware/home stores.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:16:05 AM EDT
Why wouldn't the put some type of regulator on the house portion of the water line, and put the sprinkler feed right after the water meter?
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:21:39 AM EDT
I have full pressure in my water system in my house right now. I had a plumber put on a pressure gauge and it was around 80lbs.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:37:35 AM EDT
When we bought this house and were renovating it, we opted not to install a water pressure regulator on the main line. The pressure was about 75-80 psi IIRC.

Quality fixtures can handle up to 85psi without problems, this also goes for washing machines, refrigerators, etc. However, for us, the water coming out of the shower heads was so much that it would fill the tub with 1-2 inches of water in a 10 minute shower.

We called our plumber back and had him install the regulator, and now our pressure is set to something like 60psi IIRC. It was a $100 job total for parts and labor and took him about an hour to do.

Your pipes can handle much more pressure than what you have, and you fixtures will be fine as well, but to use a crappy analogy I'll say the following... Having high water pressure is kind of like always driving on the top end - it tends to wear things out faster and leads to break downs. So install the regulator and set it to 5-10 pounds lower.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:42:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Leisure_Shoot:
Why wouldn't the put some type of regulator on the house portion of the water line, and put the sprinkler feed right after the water meter?



Done a fair amount of electrical work for a large sprinkler company here..... It's my understanding that that's what they're SUPPOSED to do.

Regulator between the high pressure for the sprinklers and the house piping.

Just easier to "Crank er up !" I guess.

Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:45:17 AM EDT
One hundred million.
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