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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/5/2004 12:31:32 PM EST
Hello All,
Ive been doing some research on cooking an entire pig.Here in South Louisiana we hang them meshed between reinforcment wire in front of an oak or pecan fire.Its a slow process but the end result is really delicious(cochon de lait as we call it) But on the internet I saw where people cook them in the ground and under rocks and all kinds of different ways!!Which have you done or seen/ate? Shane
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:36:17 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:39:22 PM EST
That Hawaiian pit thing. Tasty
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:44:26 PM EST
Bra! You aint cooking no hog in the ground in Louisiana! I have never dug a hole deeper than about 12" without it filling up with water when I lived in Louisiana. Have a Bouchere'. Fry them gratons. Make some boudin and pass a good time.

Cajun®
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:52:30 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:54:28 PM EST
That is a ton of work.

But worth it....................
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 12:56:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By kpel308:
My buddy and I laid an above ground pit using cinder blocks. Made a floor about 8 feet by 5 feet, and hooked up a rotisserie. We had walls about 3 feet high to reflect the heat.

The pig was a young one, about 90 pounds. We started charcoal in chimney starters, then poured it along the sides of the walls. We spent all night watching it turn and then had it the following afternoon. The skin was as crisp as glass.

Low and slow is the key.



They cook it over a fire in the Philippines, but the rotisserie is powered by two people, one on each end.
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:02:49 PM EST
I was at a party that the hog was cooked in ground....very nice end product.

I helped with one on a spit. Wasn't as good as the one in the ground.

MT
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:04:53 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:06:15 PM EST
Slowly!
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:06:26 PM EST
Cooked two hogs for my daughters wedding. Rented a double cooker that was
made out of old fuel oil tanks with a wash machine motor and gear/chain mechanism
for the rotisserie of both cookers that were mounted on a trailer.

Held the hogs on the skewer with chicken wire wrapped around them.
It took 6- #20 bags of charcoal each and about 12 hours. First time I ever
roasted hogs, but everybody raved about how good it was, so I guess I did ok.

GM
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:15:44 PM EST
Dose RONCO make on of them cookers ?
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:19:40 PM EST
Search "LA CHINA CAJA" You can make the same thing at home,Use thier cooking instructions
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:20:50 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:27:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Bra! You aint cooking no hog in the ground in Louisiana! I have never dug a hole deeper than about 12" without it filling up with water when I lived in Louisiana. Have a Bouchere'. Fry them gratons. Make some boudin and pass a good time.

Cajun®



I have no idea what you just said.......
Link Posted: 9/5/2004 1:56:06 PM EST
What goes rrrrnnn-rrrrrrnnn-rrnnnnn-oink-sizzle? A hog on a rotisserie!
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:39:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Bra! You aint cooking no hog in the ground in Louisiana! I have never dug a hole deeper than about 12" without it filling up with water when I lived in Louisiana. Have a Bouchere'. Fry them gratons. Make some boudin and pass a good time.

Cajun®

co mo sa va? where down dare did you live you? Im originally from Avoyelles Parish Me yaa
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:42:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By 22three:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Bra! You aint cooking no hog in the ground in Louisiana! I have never dug a hole deeper than about 12" without it filling up with water when I lived in Louisiana. Have a Bouchere'. Fry them gratons. Make some boudin and pass a good time.

Cajun®

co mo sa va? where down dare did you live you? Im originally from Avoyelles Parish Me yaa




You know.....sometimes I think we should have let them win that damn war................

Sgat1r5
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:43:19 PM EST
"Cuban Coffin"
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:58:02 PM EST
What you do is…

Dig a pit about 8 feet wide and 5 feet deep in sand (must be sand).
Line the bottom and side of the pit with large rocks.
Make a big fire in the middle of the pit using large hard woods and let it burn for 12 hours or more (do not use gasoline or lighter fluid to light the fire as it will retain the odor).
Spread the charcoal (burned wood) all around the pit.
Line the bottom and side of the pit with banana leaves.
Salt a whole medium size pig (about 80 pounds) and put it in the middle of the pit
Cover the pig with more banana leaves.
Put some of the large hot rocks on the side and on top of the pig.
Put more banana leaves to cover everything with couple layers.
Cover the whole pit with heavy duty canvas and lay sand/rocks all along the edge of the canvas to retain the heat inside the pit.
Do not open the pit until done.

Cooking time will be determined by how well the pit retains the heat and the size of the pig but you can not over cook the pig using this method.

You’ll have the most moist and juicy pork.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:29:14 PM EST
I lived for a time in South Carolina. I recall being invited to a 'pig-pickin', I had no idea WTF a p-p was, but the chick was smokin', so I accepted. Imagine my surprise when we arrived and I discovered that a p-p is what we Ohioans refer to as a fucking hog roast! Good eats, good drinks, and a good time was had by all after-hours.

I never did acquire a taste for those damned boiled peanuts though.

Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:30:54 PM EST
Napalm
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:40:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By triburst1:
Napalm



Too dry
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 2:44:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By yobo:
What you do is…

Dig a pit about 8 feet wide and 5 feet deep in sand (must be sand).
Line the bottom and side of the pit with large rocks.
Make a big fire in the middle of the pit using large hard woods and let it burn for 12 hours or more (do not use gasoline or lighter fluid to light the fire as it will retain the odor).
Spread the charcoal (burned wood) all around the pit.
Line the bottom and side of the pit with banana leaves.
Salt a whole medium size pig (about 80 pounds) and put it in the middle of the pit
Cover the pig with more banana leaves.
Put some of the large hot rocks on the side and on top of the pig.
Put more banana leaves to cover everything with couple layers.
Cover the whole pit with heavy duty canvas and lay sand/rocks all along the edge of the canvas to retain the heat inside the pit.
Do not open the pit until done.

Cooking time will be determined by how well the pit retains the heat and the size of the pig but you can not over cook the pig using this method.

You’ll have the most moist and juicy pork.



+1
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 3:58:40 PM EST
Thanks good med and all.I ty for the comments.If I could only boil an egg............
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 4:05:25 PM EST
now THAT sounds good!!! I am gonna try this one!! Thanks a million
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 5:08:07 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 6:02:08 PM EST
Cajun Microwave. Look it up. You can build that your self.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 6:08:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/9/2004 12:30:01 AM EST by Pangea]

Originally Posted By 22three:

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Bra! You aint cooking no hog in the ground in Louisiana! I have never dug a hole deeper than about 12" without it filling up with water when I lived in Louisiana. Have a Bouchere'. Fry them gratons. Make some boudin and pass a good time.

Cajun®

co mo sa va? where down dare did you live you? Im originally from Avoyelles Parish Me yaa



Ca vas bien, mom frere! Jai rester a Baton Rouge beau coup ans passe, Laffayette, a Slidel. Jai rester a Tennessee asture.

My family settled around East Baton Rouge Parrish and Iberville Parish after the expulsion over 300 years ago.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 6:18:18 PM EST
My wife is from the Micronesian island of Kosrae and they cook whole hogs on an earth oven called and um.

Step 1. Make a shallow depression in the ground
Step 2. Gather a bunch of wood and stack on top of the firewood a bunch of rocks
Step 3. Start fire and when the wood is all hot coals, spread out the rocks
Step 4. Put gutted pig on hot coals and Rocks
Step 5. Cover pig and oven with several layers of Taro leaves
Step 6. Wait about 2 hours, the pig will be cooked thru and thru - the meat will fall off the bones.

Sea Turtles, dogs, breadfruit and Taro (Taro mixed with Banana is the shit) are cooked the same way.
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 1:30:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:
My wife is from the Micronesian island of Kosrae and they cook whole hogs on an earth oven called and um.

Step 1. Make a shallow depression in the ground
Step 2. Gather a bunch of wood and stack on top of the firewood a bunch of rocks
Step 3. Start fire and when the wood is all hot coals, spread out the rocks
Step 4. Put gutted pig on hot coals and Rocks
Step 5. Cover pig and oven with several layers of Taro leaves
Step 6. Wait about 2 hours, the pig will be cooked thru and thru - the meat will fall off the bones.h
Man if I only knew what Taro leaves were? and next time I want some good cooked sea turtle or Dog I'll try this one!!! Seriously I would eat both!I'll eat anything as long as its cooked right!!Thanks for the insight
Link Posted: 9/9/2004 1:36:07 PM EST
Hey I live right by Baton Rouge now and I work there every day.Are you an LSU fan?We are lacking a sufficient quater back this year.You speak more french than me.My dad and mom both were very fluent in French and yes I guess all us coonasses originated from Nova Scotia.
Someone mentioned the coonass microwave and Ive eaten hog cooked in 1 and man o man that is some good pork!! sa san bon we!! les ze la bon temps rula losh pa mon cha!!
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