Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 9/8/2004 12:01:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2004 12:10:04 AM EDT by mtechgunman]
Ok, i need some homework help. It is for a chem class.

Here is the problem:


If the concentration of mercury in the water of a polluted lake is 0.41 µg per liter of water, what is the total mass (kg) of mercury in the lake? The lake has a surface area of 100 square miles and an average depth of 25 feet.

µg= 1x10^-6 m


anybody know how to do this?

the answer has to be in kg.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:35:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:36:12 AM EDT
How old are you?


First find the volume of the lake and convert to Liters

Hints : 1 mile = 5280 feet & 1 liter = .0353cubic feet


Then when you have the number of liters multiply by 0.41 to get the micrograms then convert micro grams to Kg
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:40:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FredM:
How old are you?


First find the volume of the lake and convert to Liters

Hints : 1 mile = 5280 feet & 1 liter = .0353cubic feet


Then when you have the number of liters multiply by 0.41 to get the micrograms then convert micro grams to Kg



almost 19.

Thanks abunch everyone.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:42:37 AM EDT
FrdM-No need to be a dick about it. What the hell does his age have to do with a chemistry class?

But yes, you have the density, conert your volume to liters, multiply and you have your mass. Count your decimals and remember to keep your units straight.

Simplified problem:

You have one gram of X/ liter of water. you have five liters of water. How many grams of X do you have?

5 grams.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:44:13 AM EDT
I sucked at math so I'm not getting involved
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:45:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:
I sucked at math so I'm not getting involved



don't worry, its not math. its chem.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 12:47:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:

Originally Posted By twonami:
I sucked at math so I'm not getting involved



don't worry, its not math. its chem.


numbers bad
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:39:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tfod:
FrdM-No need to be a dick about it. What the hell does his age have to do with a chemistry class?

But yes, you have the density, conert your volume to liters, multiply and you have your mass. Count your decimals and remember to keep your units straight.

Simplified problem:

You have one gram of X/ liter of water. you have five liters of water. How many grams of X do you have?

5 grams.



Who's being a dick? I just helped him!
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:42:46 AM EDT
Normal water or compressed water?
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:49:42 AM EDT
Explanations above are fine.

This is the first problem I did out since Calculus freshman year. Honestly having done anything outside of the basics since.

History major rawks.


- BG
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 1:50:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Taxman:
Normal water or compressed water?




Top Top