Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 1/12/2005 7:59:05 PM EDT
ok I have seen it mentioned here before....not looking for opinions nor pros/cons

Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?


Link Posted: 1/12/2005 9:14:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:

Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?




It takes work - lots of work.

My wife attends classes every year to learn methods of instruction and to check out the programs that are offered.

We use several commercial products to help teach (particularly reading - we use a Phonics based program). There are lots of programs, books, workbooks, and computer software that can help. There are also local private schools that run special program so the Homeschoolers come under their umbrella and use their curiculum. In our state if you work with one of these types of schools you don't need to do the semester reviews. Since we are doing it 'our way' we have to document out children's work and go to a review with it near the end of every semester.

We also work with our Homeschool group for special events. Homeschool kids go on way more field trips and SEE what they are learning about rather than just read about it in a book or watch a film strip.

Then there are the coop classes. My wife teaches a couple of those, we have friends that have taught others. My son is going to a Chem class taught by one of the dad's that was a chemist for a local chemical company.

Having a good local homeschool organization really helps. We are lucky in that there are several good ones in the area (homeschooling is really popular in this area and we have 2 of the highest rated schoold districts in the country). A good local group organizes group activities. Things like art shows, Drama events for the kids, discount homeschool classes for various activitie like dance, music, languages, gymnastics, Karate etc.). We even have our own Cub Scout Pack and Girl Scout Group.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 9:35:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2005 9:36:20 PM EDT by GodBlessTexas]
We deviate from the way Forest and his family do it a little. We too are members of two local home schooling groups, both of which are excellent. Field trips, 4H, Scouts, study groups, speacialists in all areas of expertise, etc. We're also a part of the state homeschool group and the Home School Legal Defense Association. There are also countless on-line homeschool resources. Our kids are by no means sheltered or isolated from other children.

We purchase our curriculum from Abeka, who are one of the several homeschool publishers out there. Most, if not all, have a Christian leaning, but I've been told there are some religion neutral publishers out there. And while we follow it, we try to take a more practical approach to learning with our 6 year old. Instead of making her read all the text, we taught her to read and let her learn about the things she likes. You'd be amazed at how much she knows about history, geography, etc. We had her tested at the end of last year to determine where she stood in her studies, and she placed in second and third grade levels in all areas. This isn't exactly extraordinary, but she was only 5 years old and we were only doing sit down school for an average of 3 hours a day. The rest of the time was spent doing applied learning out in the real world. My wife would teach her in the grocery store, at the park, at the library, etc. I can tell you that my daughter is much like me and doesn't learn like most other children, but she's thrived under homeschooling. It is a lot of work, but not nearly as much work as I had expected.

The real benefit has been to my oldest son though. At 3, he has not had any formal lessons, but he listens to his sister's. He's already teaching himself to read and can spell. Over Christmas he spelled "monkey" and "fantasia" without anyone's help while coloring. He continues to spell bigger and more complex words, and I've found him reading some of his sister's old first readers by himself, and again, neither my wife or I have spent time trying to teach him how to read. He learned by overhearing his sister's lessons. Now if I could just get him to crap on the toilet I'd feel like I accomplished something.

Edited to add, if you want info on California's Home School laws, go to www.hslda.org/hs/state/CA/default.asp. They're actually pretty decent from my skiming over them.

GBT
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 9:47:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:
and let her learn about the things she likes. You'd be amazed at how much she knows about history, geography, etc.



That is an excellent point. We can focus the learning about thing's my son is interested in - it does a much better job of keeping his attention and really improves the desire to learn.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 10:45:49 PM EDT



Oooops! Oh SORRY HUN! I know I know...


..."COUCH!"
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 10:50:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2005 10:51:53 PM EDT by 1Andy2]
I was homeschooled for my highschool years.


Basically, my dad taught me math. My mom taught me English (She was an English teacher). Everything else was videos and textbook reading.

Alot of homeschooling is self teaching. It forces the student to make himself study and develops good study habits. Unlike in a public highschool where the teachers hold the child's hand for 4 years.

Its alot of work and takes dedication from the parents and the student, but the opportunity for a good education is superior to any you might find at a public school. Plus your kid won't be indoctrinated with liberal socialist bullshit on a daily basis.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 11:31:40 PM EDT
I was homeschooled for 3rd grade through 8th grade. I had actual schooling for 1st and 2nd so I had the basics down pretty good. My mom basically got text books, and we did literally everything in them. The nice thing was my mother declared that if we finished all the problems, and assignments in all the books we were done for the year. So me and my brothers would just double time it through the school work and then have no school for 6 months out of the year. However, I discovered in highschool that I did *alot* more work than any of the other students. My mom liked to use the text books that the local schools were using. But didn't have the teachers lesson plans, so the kids in school were maybe doing 15 or 20 problems from a chapter, we were doing all of them which could be 50 to 60 or more. One of the requirements was that anyone home schooled had to go take a standardized test that showed we were learning what we were supposed to learn. So because of the fact we were doing more than twice the work, in half the time as just about anyone else, I always scored quite high on the tests.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 11:40:36 PM EDT
We have home schooled our two kids for over 6 years now. The state of California has a program (Visions) that pays for books and supplies amounting to around $1500 per kid to help pay expenseds. This is available to anyone. A teacher comes in once a month for progress reports.

As far as I am concerned sending a child to a California public school is a form of spiritual child abuse which I will not partake in.

If you want more info IM me.

SGatr15
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 11:42:13 PM EDT
And quite frankly....if you can read a book you can teach a child anything. SOme subjects were hard so I just had to learn them before I taught them to the kids.

It takes time...but we didn't find it hard to do.

Sgtar15
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 11:57:23 PM EDT
I homeschool 1 of my children. (6th grade) I am considering having my 10th grader test out of High School and take college classes. My thoughts are that if he is already doing college level work, he should get college credit for it. Why marinate in the public school system?

Decision to homeschool isn't as easy for the other two: My second grader needs some help to get up to speed, and is in a highly specialized program. Now that the root problem is gone, which also affected his vision, we are optimistic that he will catch up soon. My 1st grader loves school, she is top of her class, and a social butterfly. I would hate to take the social part away from her. I work with her on setting higher academic goals, and look at school as play time for her. She would probably be the easiest to homeschool, and I am sure that at some point I will pull her out of the public school system.

You know what program I use with xy2 But, like you, am looking for a better program.

Good post
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 12:00:38 AM EDT
I think that the dumbing down of our schools is making homeschooling that much easier. ANYTHING you can teach your kids nowadays at home is more than what they get at school.

I love the people that ask "What about social skills?"

My kids arent going to school to socialize, they are there to learn and that is where our schools are failing them.

I have said it before. Kids will rise to your expectations, DONT dumb the schools down for the digbats. and they did so... Thanks a lot!!

My friend is debating to send her son for a HS proficiency test and he is a sophmore in HS. I have NO DOUBT he will pass with flying colors, Then again in CA.... thats not saying much. I think my 1 1/2 year old can ace that ... OK Not really but you get my drift.

Give us all history test or science test that was given to 6th grade students in the 1800's Bet not ONE of us would pass it.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 12:12:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 4xys2xxs:
I homeschool 1 of my children. (6th grade) I am considering having my 10th grader test out of High School and take college classes. My thoughts are that if he is already doing college level work, he should get college credit for it. Why marinate in the public school system?



My son started college at 17. Best thing he ever did. Granted that he is the youngest in his class and it was somewhat hard for him to make friends (but he had other friends anyways) he is very happy and well ahead of the curve. Plus since math was his hardest subect it is helping him tremendously. As far as I am concerned state HS are useless and as soon as he can test out he might as well and go on to college where he will REALLY learn.

SGatr15
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 1:55:40 AM EDT
Check out Kim du Toit's essay:
www.kimdutoit.com/dr/weblog.php?id=P6233
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 2:37:48 AM EDT
Contact your local home school association and you can talk with folks who are doing it. Come prepared with lots of questions- they'll be prepared to answer them.

A while back I heard that CA was trying to stamp out homeschooling. From what I gather the homeschooling movement has really picked up steam in response to some things that the state is doing in the public schools.

To me, the bottom line question is who owns the children? Are they yours, or are they wards of the state that you just feed and house?

I've heard all kinds of criticisms of homeschooling and church-run private schools from people who 1) Don't know anything about it, or 2) Are threatened because they are in the public school machine.

The fact is, homeschooling works. Kids get an education.

There are still some good public schools out there, but I think they are becoming fewer each year.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 2:41:10 AM EDT
Kinda interesting: Almost every girl I ever dated was homeschooled, including my wife.

We want to homeschool our children, or atleast send them to a Christian school.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 3:04:07 AM EDT
I was Home schooled through High school. There are lots of books that allow for more of an independent learning environment. With lesson plans and goals that allow the student to follow along with minimal teacher guidance.

I had very low self esteem and had no social skills going INTO home schooling. I interacted with other kids through my church youth group and choir, and also at work when I got a part time job at 16.

I went to college with high self esteem and very good social skills. I graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering.

The only thing I regret about not going to a real high school was not being able to play football.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 3:33:53 AM EDT
Homeschooled 8th through 12th. Got my pilot certificate as an elective. The rest is history! My wife was homeschooled 1st through 12th. We homeschool our 3 children using ABEKA curriculum. Planerench out.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:54:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:

Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?




It takes work - lots of work.

My wife attends classes every year to learn methods of instruction and to check out the programs that are offered.

We use several commercial products to help teach (particularly reading - we use a Phonics based program). There are lots of programs, books, workbooks, and computer software that can help. There are also local private schools that run special program so the Homeschoolers come under their umbrella and use their curiculum. In our state if you work with one of these types of schools you don't need to do the semester reviews. Since we are doing it 'our way' we have to document out children's work and go to a review with it near the end of every semester.

We also work with our Homeschool group for special events. Homeschool kids go on way more field trips and SEE what they are learning about rather than just read about it in a book or watch a film strip.

Then there are the coop classes. My wife teaches a couple of those, we have friends that have taught others. My son is going to a Chem class taught by one of the dad's that was a chemist for a local chemical company.

Having a good local homeschool organization really helps. We are lucky in that there are several good ones in the area (homeschooling is really popular in this area and we have 2 of the highest rated schoold districts in the country). A good local group organizes group activities. Things like art shows, Drama events for the kids, discount homeschool classes for various activitie like dance, music, languages, gymnastics, Karate etc.). We even have our own Cub Scout Pack and Girl Scout Group.



We do homeschool our one manditory age child....
In the state of California you have 3 choices(well legal ones), use a charter or the like, file an R-4 (private school affadavit) or be a certified teacher...
We currently use a charter-type program thru our COUNTY school district (we have to transfer from local district to the county then enroll)
The rules are getting tighter and tighter and I am finding myself more frustrated with it and it is not leaving me alot of time to do things my way...instead we are busy doing what makes them happy and creating work samples
We use Math U See for math but other then that we use what they supply. I have recently begun considering the R-4 option but need to figure out what I would use for the remainder of the subjects....I was looking at Alpha Omega's SOS program....and ran across their "academy"
We have a few local co-ops here BUT most involve elementary and younger kids (4xys's 6th grader would be one of the oldest in the group).....The teen groups are all an hour plus from here...but when they have a special event, we take all 3 out there.....

So I was just looking for input from other homeschoolers as to what they use (or dont use)
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:56:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:
and let her learn about the things she likes. You'd be amazed at how much she knows about history, geography, etc.



That is an excellent point. We can focus the learning about thing's my son is interested in - it does a much better job of keeping his attention and really improves the desire to learn.



this is a problem here...I stupidly sent DFD to publice school which squashed her interest in science and history.....
and when we sent her she was a science NUT
although she does what to dissect something......
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 6:57:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DrFrige:
www.imagedump.com/pics/31173.jpg


Oooops! Oh SORRY HUN! I know I know...


..."COUCH!"



how's your back?
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 7:08:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sgtar15:
We have home schooled our two kids for over 6 years now. The state of California has a program (Visions) that pays for books and supplies amounting to around $1500 per kid to help pay expenseds. This is available to anyone. A teacher comes in once a month for progress reports.

As far as I am concerned sending a child to a California public school is a form of spiritual child abuse which I will not partake in.

If you want more info IM me.

SGatr15



i havent heard of vision....
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:53:32 AM EDT
I was home schooled!

Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:59:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:
Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?



My wife and I use packaged curriculum from a Mennonite vendor. The curriculum is rigorous, pretty well done, and reasonably priced. We evaluate what we've done each year and supplement or switch vendors based on how well things went, how the material is layed out, how the teachers' guide works, and how the kids liked it.

My wife teaches the bulk of the material during the day. I teach the middle school english and help with the math in the evenings.

We're members of a supportive small local group, which helps immensely.

It's been great for our family, not only educationally, but relationship-wise as well.

hth
Scott
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 9:05:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 9:28:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2005 9:29:20 AM EDT by MrsDrFrige]

Originally Posted By Scottman:

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:
Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?



My wife and I use packaged curriculum from a Mennonite vendor.


Rod and staff? do you supplement their history?
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:15:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:19:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:

Originally Posted By Scottman:

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:
Just wondering for those that homeschool....how do you do it? what do you use?



My wife and I use packaged curriculum from a Mennonite vendor.


Rod and staff? do you supplement their history?



I did not care for R&S's history. The reason being - it's not history, it's social studies. SS is fine but I prefer history. I did a year of Beautiful Feet and loved it but it was too difficult for my son [autistic]. It was excellent for my daughter but I could only afford to buy one curriculum so I went with ABEKA.

Patty



I have a friend using a mennonite curriculum and they skip over any war related items....either they dont cover it(the publisher) or the family is forced to skip it due to the bad bias in it...
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:25:12 AM EDT
I've been homeschooled since kindergarten. My parents used Bob Jones, Alpha Omega, ABEKA, and Saxon(Math) curricula when I was in the lower grades(K-8). I enrolled in American School when I was a freshman and I'll be receiving my diploma from them in just a couple months.



Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:28:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Planerench:
Homeschooled 8th through 12th. Got my pilot certificate as an elective. The rest is history! My wife was homeschooled 1st through 12th. We homeschool our 3 children using ABEKA curriculum. Planerench out.



ABEKA,Thats what I was taught from when I was in a Christian grade school back in the early 80s. I am probably going to homeschool my son on that same curriculum.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:33:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:

Originally Posted By Planerench:
Homeschooled 8th through 12th. Got my pilot certificate as an elective. The rest is history! My wife was homeschooled 1st through 12th. We homeschool our 3 children using ABEKA curriculum. Planerench out.



ABEKA,Thats what I was taught from when I was in a Christian grade school back in the early 80s. I am probably going to homeschool my son on that same curriculum.



we have used ABEKA in the past for math and early language arts....currently we are using a public school program and ABEKA is not allowed by name because of the known religious affliations...when we used them for math, we could not turn in work samples with the bible verse at the bottom of the page....(about every 3rd page in math has a bible verse on the bottom of the page)...
I actually found ABEKA's math program overly rigourous and had to tone it down a bit....
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:15:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:16:14 AM EDT
We use life.


MT
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:25:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MT_Pockets:
We use life.


MT



ok complete serious inquiry.....
does that mean you subscribe to the "unschooling" or charlotte mason method of homeschooling?
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:27:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
ABEKA is good but it's too much. It's impossible to do it all in a year. I have never done their math though. I've always done Saxon. My Son just started public school this year on the insistance of my husband [I really regret this but had no say in it]. Anyway, my sons in the 10th grade and started pre calculus and is the top math student in the school. My daughter is having trouble [although she had never had trouble with saxon] adapting to her teacher's teaching style. I will probably just dig out my saxon this summer and re teach her.

Patty


DFD and I butt heads over math.....hence why the math u see has worked out for us....I always just got math....very little if any explanation needed...(i sat in class and did my homework while the teacher talked) so, when she needs explanation, it is hard...I usually have to show her how I work the problem (thus doing her work)
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:30:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/13/2005 11:31:32 AM EDT by fisherman081]
I'm homeschooled. I'm in my junior year of high school now, and love it. I did the public school thing for awhie, but I hated that. For the most part I learn from my textbooks. My mom gives me tests and quizes while my dad helps with my calculus. Like alot of people said it requires alot of self discipline, it would be really easy for me to just slack off and read ARFCOM all day. Speaking of that i'd better get to doing my school work now.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 11:38:52 AM EDT
I homeschooled 3rd-5th grades, then 8th through my senior year, which I skipped because I took dual-credit courses at the community college that let me skip my senior year of high school and most of my freshman year requirements at college.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 12:08:45 PM EDT
I was home-educated (as my Dad always said) K-12 and would like the do the same for my children in the future (though my wife, I assume, will have a say:). My Mom was a teacher before my sister and I came along so she just made up her own course of study. We used some Saxon, Bob Jones and other types designed for home-educators at times but she also would get the books that the Christian school at our church used most of the time. She would make us a list of subjects we had to complete that day and we weren't done until it was all checked off. She tried to roughly follow the areas of study the public schools were doing so we were at approximately the same level. When we got to some of the higher level high school subjects (like biology, chemistry, etc.) we were able to attend classes offered by one of the local homeschool groups. There are a lot more suplimentary classes and such available now and my younger siblings have taken advantage of more of those than us older ones. When my twin sister and I were younger (we're the oldest) my Mom worried about whether she did a good enough job and how we would do in college. After doing well on several standardized test she worried less and now both of us are finished with our degrees (I got mine with Honors, yeah baby). My little sister is currently dual enrolled and is doing very well. IMHO the best thing home-education taught me is how to teach myself and find the answers to my questions. I found subjects that I enjoy learning about and it wasn't a chore to learn. Plus with more attention from the teacher I couldn't "slack off" like so many of my classmates in college had learned to do. I spent many an evening doing the rest of my school work before I could eat dinner.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 12:19:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrsDrFrige:

Originally Posted By MT_Pockets:
We use life.


MT



ok complete serious inquiry.....
does that mean you subscribe to the "unschooling" or charlotte mason method of homeschooling?



I am saying that each child is different. I have three children and they all require different methods.

I don't know about unschooling or C. Mason.

Feel free to IM me on the subject.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 2:21:00 PM EDT
The "unschooler" segment of Homeschoolers is very very small. Most homeschoolers I know use waaaay more challenging curriculum than the average dumbed down public school.


I went to the local Junior college for a year after highschool to get my basics done...
The English was all essentially the same stuff I learned in my Sophomore year in highschool!
The Math was what I already knew from my Junior year in highschool!

You know why Junior colleges are necessary? Because public highschools are too busy indoctrinating and being PC to teach effectively.
Top Top