Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/15/2005 6:45:16 AM EDT
Homeless hold sleep-over to protest panhandling ban

Monday, August 15, 2005; Posted: 10:13 a.m. EDT (14:13 GMT)


Homeless people and advocates gather at Atlanta City Hall to protest a proposed panhandling ban.

ATLANTA, Georgia (AP) -- Homeless people and dozens of advocates spent the night at Atlanta City Hall to show their opposition to a proposed panhandling ban backed by downtown businesses.

"It's far from out of control," said Ronald Lee, a 48-year-old Washington, D.C., native who has been homeless in Atlanta for eight months.

"In our nation's capital, people ask for money right in front of the White House," he said. "If someone wants to assist you, I don't see a problem with it."

Lee was among those who gathered on the steps before a planned vote on the ban Monday by city leaders -- a vote that was delayed last month after a contentious meeting that included shouting matches and hissing from critics.

The proposed resolution would make it illegal to beg for money near downtown hotels or tourist sites. On a third offense, beggars could be jailed or fined.

Downtown business owners say aggressive beggars are keeping people away from the central business district. Last month, Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus, who is bankrolling the $200 million Georgia Aquarium being built downtown, threw his support behind the ban, saying the success of the attraction depends on its passing.

Advocates are instead pushing for affordable housing and a living wage for the city's homeless population, saying the ban would criminalize a person's right to ask for charity when they cannot take care of themselves.

"People have the right to ask, and people have the right to say no," activist and former city council member Derrick Boazman said.

Marcus, a billionaire philanthropist, said he has donated $600,000 through his foundation to the Gateway Center, a 300-bed facility for the city's homeless.

Several critics call the proposed ban a civil rights issue since many of the beggars are black.

"This is really about poor, black men. We're bad for business," said Joe Beasley, a 68-year-old Atlanta native who heads the regional office of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition.




How did they get a tent in the first place?
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:33:09 AM EDT
bump for lunch crew
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:34:19 AM EDT
They were just looking for a better place to sleep and keep it legal.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:37:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:47:52 AM EDT
Get the Scoops!!

Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:49:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By osprey21:
Get the Scoops!!

jahsonic.com/SoylentGreen.jpg



I am glad to see the little league team come out to help, look at those helmets.
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:50:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/15/2005 8:51:44 AM EDT by Scottman]

Originally Posted By Mantis_51:

"This is really about poor, black men. We're bad for business," said Joe Beasley, a 68-year-old Atlanta native who heads the regional office of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition.









How did they get a tent in the first place?



"and advocates"

Scott
Link Posted: 8/15/2005 8:51:52 AM EDT
Jail them? But then they'd have a roof over their heads and food.
Top Top